Bathroom vanity gap


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Old 11-26-14, 08:15 PM
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Bathroom vanity gap

Hello,

I just finished up all of my plumbing and set in the powder room vanity. The vanity is 24 inches and no back panel.

My problem is, the vanity sits out
1 1/16in from the wall. It is pushed back against 1/2 inch shoe molding and 9/16 inch (width) trim. I figured I would trim the entire room to keep it uniform.

Would it be best to cut the trim and shoe molding to get it to mount against the wall or is there a better trick out there?

Thanks!

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Old 11-26-14, 08:41 PM
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You could put some sort of mounting strip behind the splash thingy (forgot the name). I would probably cut the molding.
 
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Old 11-26-14, 10:20 PM
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I'd be marking the moulding and cutting it in place with my oscillating saw.
About a 5 min. job.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 04:08 AM
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Molding is installed AFTER the rest of the fixtures are in place not before. If you can get a good cut with an oscillating saw then you can do it in place. Otherwise, pull the vanity out, remove the molding, install vanity and then recut the molding to fit the new opening.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 07:59 AM
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Just to be clear in my suggestion, you mark it with the vanity in place, slide the vanity out, make your cut, remove that one section where the vanity goes, then slide it back in place and screw the vanity to the wall through the top backer plate into the studs. (easier to do without the counter top in place)
 
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Old 11-27-14, 09:23 AM
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I think everyone agrees on this. This is cabinet install 101. Molding must be cut out so cabinet can be set back against wall.
As a professional installer, the oscillating tool is my best friend. If you don't have one, I'd get one. Purchase one that will accept the original Fein Blades. From my experience, Fein blades are the best cutting and have a wide variety of blades.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 10:40 AM
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the oscillating tool is my best friend
While I use mine way more than I care to admit, truth is that it is mostly used to undercut door casings and jambs for flooring installs and for re-grouting/freshening showers. Other than that,it is not a reliable enough straight cut to do molding with. I once used it to cut a remodel box opening in the side of a solid 3/4" oak cabinet in a island for a disposal/light switch. Set the smoke detector off a few times....
 
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Old 11-27-14, 12:17 PM
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Yes, I know. You don't want to cut 3/4" Oak with it.
You don't want to cut any 3/4" material with it. I don't even use it for 1/2" material, it's not practical. For trimming shims, cutting outlet openings in drywall, it's perfect.
The trim that needs removed by OP, I could cut perfectly with oscillating tool. It's experience and knowing how to get a clean and square cut. A good blade doesn't hurt.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 12:51 PM
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I've used mine many times to cut 3/4" oak floors when doing repairs to just one piece in the middle of a room, dozens of 3/4 pine jambs and trim.
New course tooth blade, let the saw do the cutting, making several passes instead of plunge cuts seems to work better.
FYI I found the blades on Amazon sold in packs of 15 for less then $100.00.
That's about $6.66 a blade.
 
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Old 11-28-14, 07:47 AM
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I'm going to check those blades out, that's really cheap. I've paid more than $25.00 for just one blade, the one's that cut metal and wood both.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:25 PM
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Hello all,


Thank you for all the responses. I ended up using an oscillating tool and notching out the trim. I wanted to try and save the 5 inch trim just in case I decided to go with a different vanity. I was seeing if there were any other tips of the trade. Thank you all again!
 
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Old 12-02-14, 06:17 PM
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Good Job. Remember the vanity costs much more than the trim, get that set and everything is good.
 
 

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