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Installing backsplash tile for the first time- some questions!

Installing backsplash tile for the first time- some questions!


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Old 12-20-14, 03:46 PM
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Question Installing backsplash tile for the first time- some questions!

Hi Kitchens and bathroom forumgoers,

So, here's our kitchen as it stands today.



I'll be re-doing the cabinets and counters, and replacing that mirrored backsplash with backsplash tile.

But, I do have some questions about installing a new backsplash:
[LIST][*]What type of backsplash material is best to use? Glass? Stone? We're looking for something that's easy to install, durable, reflects sunlight (to "open up" the kitchen). Any drawbacks/disadvantages to using this Youtube "How-To" VideoThanks for your help.
 
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Old 12-20-14, 03:54 PM
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Question

Sorry for the strange formatting on my questions. For some reason, this forum's BB Code won't properly update. So here are my questions in case there's any confusion:
  • The drywall behind the counter is just cheap quality drywall. So what kind of backsplash tile adhesive is best to use?
  • Can a mitre saw be used to cut backsplash tile? Or should only a wet saw be used?
  • What type of material is best to use for backsplash tile? Glass? Stone? I'm looking for something that's quick to install, and reflects sunlight nicely so as to "open up" the kitchen.
  • Any drawbacks to using this "Smart Tile" stuff?
 
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Old 12-20-14, 06:25 PM
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Drywall if it is in good shape is a fine backer for back splashes, since they are not in a wet area. You will need to use a wet tile saw to cut your tile and achieve square cuts. The material will be totally a personal choice. I used 2x2 squares on mesh to do ours in a light earth tone. Glass is pretty tough for a first time DIY project. Smart Tile glass is a royal PITA first time out. You have to mesh the tiles as you go, and any deviation due to counters not being level will show up. I'd stick to larger format tile, such as the 2x2 ceramic I mentioned. Porous stone is out as well, since it will absorb all the greases and dirt produced in a kitchen.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 02:29 PM
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Hey Chandler, I'm thinking about doing the same thing in my kitchen. Why do you say that glass tile is tough for a first time? Curious as it would be a first time for me too. I love the look of the glass tiles that come on the mesh.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 03:00 PM
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IP, I say it is tough just out of the starting gate. With experience it is easier. You need to remember to follow a straight line, even if it means using a laser. Your cabinets may not be installed perfectly level, nor may your countertop. Those teeth on the glass tile must mesh almost perfectly to look uniform. Any deviation will be like putting up a sign, "looky here". Cutting glass is a little tougher than cutting ceramic or natural stone. The worst I have done is natural slate in small pieces. It flecked off as fast as you cut it.

Don't try to cut the rectangle for receptacles, etc as you lay it. Cut enough of the tile away from the mesh to allow you to lay in the full mesh piece and get it trued. You can add the smaller pieces later to fill in, since you have to cut them individually, anyway.

Here's one we did a month or so ago for a client. Only difference was there was no grout line. Solid matching of the teeth was imperative. Natural stone, not glass.

Name:  Guthrie backsplash 2.jpg
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Old 12-21-14, 05:16 PM
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But I could use ceramic tile on a sheet? My fear is not using a sheet that it just wouldn't be straight.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:41 PM
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The glass tile are on a sheet as well as most smaller ceramic tiles. Yeah, you would have a tough time with individual tiles. As I said earlier, or maybe in another post, I put 2x2 squares on a mesh in ceramic earth tone and it looks really good.
 
 

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