Critique bathroom remodel

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Old 12-22-14, 07:37 PM
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Critique bathroom remodel

We're remodeling our master bath. The current bathroom has a massive useless garden tub in one corner, and an itty bitty shower on the other side, with only one small walk-in closet. The idea is to remove the garden tub, replace it with a nice tile shower, and tear out the existing shower and expand that space to add an additional small closet with bi-fold doors. Here is a picture of the existing floor plan (left) and new plan (right) with dimensions.

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And here is a rendering of how the new design will look.

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And here is an alternate rendering that might save a little money by simplifying the shower glass by using another stud column.

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Thoughts about the layout? For material, I'm thinking ceramic rectangular tiles kind of like I've rendered. What do you think about that?
 
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Old 12-22-14, 10:06 PM
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Hello... Before you start ripping things apart you need to think plumbing... Waste lines and venting to be specific..

The shower is 2" and the tub is 1 1/2. You need to change the tub to 2" if putting shower there..

Where is the stack?
How is it all vented?
Do you have enough pitch to move pipes?
Whats below the bathroom? ( Living space?).

You may be in for a heap of trouble..

Plumbing will dictate the layout and design, not the other way around.
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 12-23-14 at 04:00 AM.
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Old 12-23-14, 03:27 AM
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The plumbing is primary. Once you have that done you can move on to building. Personally I don't like shower doors or curtains. All the showers I build, I try to talk the client into doorless operations. With yours, looking from above moving CCW from vanity, leave wall A alone. Shorten wall B to allow for an adequate opening at wall C. Put your supply and shower head on wall D. A slit drain would be nice at the opening, but not absolutely necessary. You may have some splash out, but minor. Most of the force of the water will be contained by the walls and glass. Leave the glass as you have it in the first picture for aesthetics, making all the glass as walls, not doors.

Czizzi will be along shortly after breakfast, so more ideas are coming.
 
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Old 12-23-14, 07:04 AM
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This is a second floor bathroom. Looking from the top of the diagram, the top and left walls are exterior walls (note the glass block windows in the shower, which are currently regular windows but will need to be waterproofed).

The stack is located somewhere near the middle of the house (nearest to the bottom right corner of the diagram) so the pipes will run in that direction. I'll head up into the attic over lunch to see if I can more precisly locate the stack. I am assuming that the tub and shower currently share a 2" drain pipe with seperate traps. We're removing and replacing the tile floor as part of the project, so only the floor joists will impede access.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 05:54 AM
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Sorry I missed this yesterday morning, I will work an a design idea or two during the day.

I do have initial concern about your shower. As currently designed, it would put your water supply lines and diverter in an exterior wall. May or may not be an issue for someone in Kansas, but would be concerns further north. Does building code dictate 2x6 exterior walls or 2x4 in your area?

I like these kinds of projects, wonderful challenge.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 06:59 AM
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I agree on avoiding exterior walls for plumbing. My plan was to place the shower head on the new 2-foot wall that extends down vertically from the top of the diagram. This way, the water sprays towards the walls as opposed to the door. It does require that the shower head be angled slightly towards the middle of the shower, but I really don't mind this.

It also requires the least modification to the plumbing because the garden tub supply is already right there at the top right corner of the tub.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 08:12 AM
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What you need to do is find the stack in relation to the bathroom. and the vent most likely comes up frpm the sink to the attic.

It may be like this is how I picture it.

Yellow 3"
green 2" (the arms to the sink are 1 1/2" though)
red 1 1/2"

You will need to remove the green arm of the shower.
The red will need to be made 2" and connect where the shower does now.

This will be the whole isse and proper pitch may play a big roll.

But this picture may not be true and all piping may go directly in basement and tie in there. There would be separate tub/sink and shower vents then. You could tell by looking in attic and basement...

Most homeowners tackle this job, open the walls and floors then go " Ooooops". It cant be done with out more major renovations...



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Old 12-24-14, 08:41 AM
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The neo-angle is going to add some expense to the shower door if going custom frameless. I also see the old shower/closet conversion to be somewhat awkward as if an afterthought. A closet there only works in my eyes if it is a linen closet.

I also find large master suites with a toilet in the main room to be somewhat limiting. Do two people want to use the bathroom if one is using the toilet? Therefore, I like to incorporate a water closet room to give privacy to someone wishing to "read the newspaper" and allow someone else to shower or put on makeup.

Given what little you have mentioned, I have the following two suggestions. Design one incorporates a large walk in closet for her, and a smaller one for him. It provides a 4' wide double vanity and a separate makeup vanity table where the old shower was. Separate water closet and a generous 3'x5' shower with water service on the center interior wall.

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Second design is similar to the first but provides equal closet space for both. It then provides 3' wide his and hers vanities on opposite sides of the room. Water closet and shower remain the same.

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Old 12-24-14, 09:21 AM
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Thanks for the ideas and drawings! Your concerns about the toilet being exposed, and the second closet looking like an afterthought, are valid.

That being said, I see three main problems with the designs. First, there's the added expense of moving doors and building/modifying all those additional walls. Second, I really can't move the entrance to the bathroom as your plans depict, as it messes up our master bedroom layout, and it would make my wife's walk-in closet even smaller than it already is (not acceptable ).

Third, while the plans look spacious on paper, in reality they'll be very cramped. We're spending too much on this remodel to end up with only a 3x5 shower. As much as I'd like a door to the toilet room, the room as drawn is only 30" wide which is extremely tight quarters. In the first plan, a 40" wide double vanity is almost useless because almost all the counterspace is consumed by the sinks themselves. And the added "walk-in" closet is so small that it really doesn't add any functionality over the bi-fold door closet in the original plan.

I think the original plan adequately shields the toilet area so that we can get by without a door. There is a closet wall next to the toilet (I could probably bring that out another 6 inches, too), and there is the shower wall in front of the toilet. Honestly, as I look at it, I might be able to simply add an angled door to the original plan to make a toilet room. Can't remember how much width I've got to work with there.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 10:08 AM
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No one said that the extra closet space was for you

Just be aware, that the neo-angled shower with water service on one of the small walls, will render the majority of the left side of the shower un-usable. So the big shower you desire will get small really fast. Therefore a 3x5 shower will actually feel bigger. 15.875 SqFt of space by your neo-angle vs 15 SqFt on 3x5. It is also easier to incorporate a bench in a rectangle shower as opposed to a trapezoidal one.

Partition walls are inexpensive to erect. I guess the point is that look at the whole space as a blank slate instead of trying to look only at the current space available. Utilizing 1/2 walls and glass in the shower will also add to a more open feel.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 10:49 AM
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That's a good point - I guess a 3x5 rectangle really isn't that much smaller than the trapezoid design.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 01:35 PM
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I just finished a 3x4 shower and it is plenty large. A bathtub/shower combo is 30" by 60". When you remove the tub thickness and extend to the full 36" width, it makes all the difference. Send us a larger schematic that includes your master bedroom layout so we can get the full picture.

Are you doing the work or hiring it out?
 
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Old 12-24-14, 01:47 PM
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I would maybe move the toilet to the current shower location. Then have new a square shower where toilet is. Then small closet where tub was...

Neo angles stink IMO.
 
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Old 12-26-14, 07:33 AM
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I'm coming around to the idea of doing a rectangular shower in the corner, plus the rectangular toilet room, similar to the top half of czizzi's drawings above. You are right that the trapezoid doesn't really add any significant usable space over a rectangular shower. This should also diminish the cost of the project, both in terms of simplifying the glass (no angles), slightly reducing the amount of glass, and simplifying the stud walls. The larger new wall will also allow for a centered showerhead.

I'm going to stick with the bottom half (closets, vanities) as I originally designed it. Thanks everyone for your excellent input! And obviously, if you other advice, please share.
 
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Old 12-26-14, 08:30 AM
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Ok, next question: if I go with the layout of rectangular shower in corner and double vanity along the side, how should the vanity connect (or not) to the shower?

Should I take the vanity flush to a half-wall built for the shower (as depicted in earlier renderings), or is it simpler/cheaper/better to put a gap between the vanity and shower, and run shower glass all the way to the floor?

I've got the length along the "left" wall that I could run a shorter vanity, leave maybe an 18' gap, and then just run the shower glass straight to the floor. I'm guessing this option might be a bit cheaper since I'm getting a smaller vanity and not building a half-wall.

or, I could just run the vanity the full length and get more counter space.

What would you do? And if you left a gap, how would you tile the backsplash? Do you just tile above the vanity, or also tile the gap and adjoining half-wall?
 
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Old 12-26-14, 01:09 PM
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Your glass on the 1/2 wall will most likely be fabricated in the shape of the number "7" with most sitting on the wall with a return that goes all the way down to the curb. Therefore, the 1/2 wall will also act in some way as a support for the glass. You would therefore want that to be as solid as possible. Making it one with the cabinetry will make for the strongest wall to support the glass. It will also make the counter tops seem more finished as opposed to a floating design that again will look like an after thought.

Have you determined what tile you are going to use? If a relative neutral, you can use a piece of Crema Marfil Marble as a cap for the 1/2 wall and as a base for the glass to sit on. Have the marble cut so that it overhangs both sides of the finished wall (take into account tile, backer and framing on both sides). https://www.google.com/search?q=marb...ed=0CAcQ_AUoAg The marble is about 3/4" thick by whatever dimensions you desire. Have it sloped ever so slightly back toward the shower similar to the curb slope.
 
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Old 12-29-14, 11:22 AM
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I visited some glass shops today, and showed them a couple of different designs. I showed them the original trapezoid design where the vanity comes to a half-wall with the shower. I also showed them two versions of the rectangular shower - one with full-length panes where there is a gap between shower and vanity, and another where there the vanity comes to a half-wall with shower.

Both shops told me that any of the designs are feasible, the shower door can meet directly with the half-wall (no special cut "seven" piece required). The prices weren't that different either! The trapezoid was a few hundred more because it requires three different panes and an angle.

The cheapest option was the rectangular shower with the half wall. This is also the option my wife likes, because she would prefer to have a longer vanity with more counterspace and cabinet space, as opposed to an empty gap between shower and vanity.

I still think the trapezoid design is the "prettiest" and helps open up the bathroom floor a bit, but the rectangular shower will be cheaper to build (in terms of glass, framing, and tile), it also allows for centering of the showerhead on the new wall, and it also provides additional screening of the toilet area.
 
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