Remodel - planning stage

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-03-15, 09:07 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 603
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Remodel - planning stage

Had a remodel rep out to look at a project we would like to undertake involving removing a load-bearing wall that is currently separating our living room and kitchen. The wall is about 12.5' long with openings at each end to allow access between the two rooms [total of 19'].

House [late 60's] is single-story, attic access, no trusses.

His suggestion was to place a glulam above the ceiling the total length of the opening [19'] to be held up by a 4x4 [or 2 2x4's fastened together] at each end of the glulam and hang the joists from the glulam. As well as re-support the floor from underneath, in the crawl space.

I am starting to feel leary about changing the structure of the house [because of the unknown]. People in the construction industry might not lose any sleep over this but, to me it is somewhat major.


Does this seem like a reasonable solution to removing a wall or should I leave, say, two columns in place of the wall so as not to fundamentally change the structure of the house?

Any other comments/suggestions on what to expect or watch out for are appreciated.

Thanks,
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-03-15, 09:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,471
Received 16 Votes on 14 Posts
In order to obtain the building permit the contractor would have to submit to the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ, i.e the local building department) a stamped drawing from a roistered professional structural engineer denoting all the dimensions and load-bearing capacities of the proposed beam and its supports. The plans review people will either pass or reject the plans.

The plan IS sound, as long as all structural requirements are met according to the engineer's plan. If the contractor tries to tell you no stamped drawing (stamped with the PE's registration number) or building permit is needed I suggest that you quickly usher them out the door.
 
  #3  
Old 01-04-15, 04:57 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I agree with Furd. All the support must go to terra firma, so to speak. Your floor joists alone cannot carry that transferred weight. He seems to know his stuff, but, likewise, don't let him tell you permits and drawings from an engineer aren't needed. It is YOUR house and even if you don't plan on living there forever, those who may purchase it in the future will need assurances it was done correctly.
 
  #4  
Old 01-04-15, 05:46 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'll just echo the others so you know we're all on the same page. The plan sounds good, but it must be approved. So make sure contractor gets a building permit and inspections are performed. Once work is done, permit will get final approval.
As far as changing the structure, you will be fine as long as all that was stated here by myself and others is followed.
One thing about building department officials, they have engineers that calculate these type of things. However, it's not their job to design it for you, only to review and approve plans.
My point is you should be in good hands. You have the contractor who hopefully has a lot of experience, you have the engineer that will prepare calculations and annotate drawings, you have the building department reviewing and approving the drawings as structurally sound.
It all hinges around that permit.
 
  #5  
Old 01-05-15, 09:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 603
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies -- I feel much better about that now. Yes, he did mention getting a permit from the city.

And in obtaining the permit, I am guessing that the engineering plans, meeting and approval are all done behind the scenes by the remodeler and the city. Meaning, I mainly concern myself with the fact that he obtained the permit and it will be inspected by the city -- Correct?

There are so many [little] things in a 'semi-major' remodel -- and we were concerned about just picking out cabinets, countertops and appliances -- LOL.

----------------
It seems like the company is on the 'up and up' -- Met up with them at a Home Show. We can keep up with deadlines/progress through some software that we can log into and, once we get this 'show on the road' we are able/planning to do some of the work ourselves.
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-15, 09:21 AM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,451
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, All the engineering and coordinating with the City will be performed by contractor.
For you, just check and make sure permit is obtained, have contractor show you the paperwork and permit.

I remodel kitchens almost exclusively, so if you need any advice there, just ask. There are others here also that can steer you right.
 
  #7  
Old 01-05-15, 04:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,471
Received 16 Votes on 14 Posts
Since plans, drawings and the like are part of the permit, make certain that all are included and show the major structural work being done. A simple "general kitchen remodel" permit is not enough.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes