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Removing part of the backsplash on laminate countertop

Removing part of the backsplash on laminate countertop

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Old 01-06-15, 07:33 AM
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Removing part of the backsplash on laminate countertop

I am replacing the laminate countertop in my bathroom. The new countertop has a built in backsplash that is curved at the bottom. I need to remove a portion of the backsplash because there is a cabinet that sits on top the counter, and the cabinet needs to be set against the wall. My question is: how do I cut off part of the backsplash?

I have read a bunch of posts about cutting laminate countertops to length with a circular saw, but that is not quite what I need to do. Also, the fact that the backsplash is curved where is attaches to the countertop concerns me. It curves down ever so slightly before the rise of the backsplash. I'm not sure how to cut in the exact right place.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 07:51 AM
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You did not say where you need to cut the back spash. In the upper parts it's not so bad. Down in the curve area it becomes more difficult but it can be done. Once you say where you need to cut we can provide specifics but it's basically the same as cutting for length only you're running in the other direction.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 08:18 AM
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Yeah,
Like Dane said, I think we need a better idea of how this cabinet will sit on the counter.
If it's like an appliance garage, where it has a foot print of let's say 12" deep x 18" wide, that's easy. The cut at the cove won't be seen and you only need a clean cut on the vertical side of splash.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 11:45 AM
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The countertop is a seven foot long rectangular section that sits on top some cabinents including the one that will house my sink. Of course, the backsplash runs along one wall, and one end of the counter butts up against another wall. In other words, it is in a corner. The cabinet that sits on top the counter will go back in this corner (against both walls). The cabinet on top the counter is the same kind as the ones the counter top sits on, so its depth is all the way up to the lip.

But you guys are right, the horizontal cut won't be seen, just the vertical one.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 12:12 PM
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I must say, I have never seen this before. I'm wondering why a tall cabinet wasn't just placed in the corner.
It sounds like all you need to do is make one straight vertical cut through backsplash, the coved section that will sit under cabinet will never be seen.
Make your vertical cut from the backside with sharp blade circular saw and edge guide. Actually, I would cut it with a jigsaw and a little sanding. But I have a very nice Bosch jigsaw and can get some nice cuts. A nice cut, a little sanding, and some non-intrusive looking caulk will give you a perfect finish.
 
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Old 01-06-15, 01:12 PM
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Yea, I would have gone with a tall cabinet and butted the counter into it. If you are using existing then you work with what you've got.

The horizontal cut will be easy as it will be covered by year cabinet. The vertical one you should be a bit careful. I like to use a sharp, fine toothed blade and you want the teeth cutting as they pull back into the particle board backer. With most saws this means cutting from the back side. A circular saw is faster but requires more skill. A reciprocating (SawZall) saw or jig saw cut slower but are more forgiving to work with. Then the gap or joint can be neatened up with a bead of caulk.
 
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