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Granite vanity: top back and side splash question

Granite vanity: top back and side splash question


  #1  
Old 01-15-15, 08:55 AM
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Granite vanity: top back and side splash question

Installing a new double sink vanity top in a bathroom. Does one typically place the back and side splashes on top of the vanity top (thus 4" high), or behind and to the side of the top (thus ~3 1/4" high)?

I expect this is just individual preference.

What I'm most interested in is if there is a good reason to NOT place it behind and to the side of the vanity top.

Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-15, 08:56 AM
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The top often doesn't quite scribe to the wall or meet flush for one reason or another and the backsplash and sides on top hide such gaps.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 02:05 PM
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What Mitch says is the rule of thumb. If you do it the other way it will look a bit odd.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 02:45 PM
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It's not preference. It must be done the way Mitch stated.
The splash sits on the counter always. If you reversed it, the counter would be pushed away from the wall on two or three edges, Say 3/4", leaving it suspended/unsupported.

And it covers the gaps as mentioned, which are always present.
 
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Old 01-15-15, 02:49 PM
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I also lay the backsplash in a bead of caulking to seal the installation against drips from over spray of water from the sinks, or aggressive cleaning. So, another vote for on top in addition to the other reasons stated.
 
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Old 01-16-15, 10:29 AM
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Then how to deal with the cabinet door, and the bowed wall

All,

Thanks for the feedback. Yes, my preference is also for the top; now I understand why that is preferred. But ...

See the attached picture. I am replacing the old composite vanity top with a new granite top. The 1.5" filler strip on the right side is how the old one was installed. This allowed the right door to open to almost 90 degrees before being stopped by the heating unit.

I planned to remove that 1.5" filler (actually I did yesterday) and push the vanity all the way to the right against the wall, leaving a 1/2" vertical gap for the 1/2" overhang of the new granite top.

When I did this, the right cabinet door would only open about 1/3 of the way as shown the picture. NOTE: This picture is with the 1.5" filler strip where the door opens to ~90 degrees. I just left the door partially open to show you what it would be like with only a 1/2" filler strip.

So now I'm left with a choice of installing the back and slide splash on top of the granite top, but then not being to really use that door, or

leave it as it was before with the 1.5" filler strip and place the side splash to the right of the vanity top. Ditto the back splash sitting behind the top.

1. Any suggestions on how to handle this for the splashes sitting on top of the granite - the right way to do it? Right now, I don't have a clue what to do.

2. And worse - the back wall (49" long vanity top) is bowed. Using a straight edge, the gap runs from ~3/16", 8 inches in from either side to 1/4" in the center of the 49" span. Yes, I could tear down the wall behind the vanity and shim it out such that the wall is now flat, but this feels like overkill.

Any other suggestions as to how to handle this?

My thanks for your inputs. Here I though I was close to done with the bathroom renovations.
 
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Last edited by jdbs3; 01-16-15 at 11:45 AM.
  #7  
Old 01-16-15, 02:19 PM
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I'm not understanding why you would push the cabinet all the way to the right after removing the filler strip. Why not just remove filler and leave cabinet where it was allowing the door to swing open near 90 degrees. The count top can over hand that much without a problem. Then just use a bigger filler on the front side.

Are you going to tile the wall above the vanity? If so a larger grout gap will hide or blend in the gap on the wall. You could also just "fill-in the bowed section of wall with plaster to even it out.
 
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Old 01-16-15, 03:37 PM
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Now you know why the filler is needed and should stay - So that the door can clear the heat register.

Once you have your granite installed, leave the backsplash loose and not attached. Hand place it up against the back wall. Take a pencil and scribe a line on the drywall at the exact height of the back splash. Remove the back splash and carve out some of the drywall behind where the backsplash will be such that the backslplash can be set into the wall somewhat to account for the wave. Then a bead of caulking to finish the top. The granite backsplash is thick enough that you can hide some in the wall and still have plenty to be visible.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 06:33 AM
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czizzi, Norm201,

No plans to tile the wall above the vanity. But now I have 2 alternatives for the bowed back wall. Thanks!

Norm201,

I'm not understanding why you would push the cabinet all the way to the right after removing the filler strip. Why not just remove filler and leave cabinet where it was allowing the door to swing open near 90 degrees. The count top can over hand that much without a problem. Then just use a bigger filler on the front side.
I had pushed the vanity all the way to the right (less 1/2" for the overhang of the new granite) so that the new granite top would butt against the side wall and the side splash could then sit on top of it flush to the wall.

Yes, I can remove the filler and leave the cabinet where it is, but then if the side splash is sitting on top of the granite top, there would be an ~3/4" gap between the back side of the side splash and the side wall. That would look strange.

I'm also not understanding what you mean by
then just use a bigger filler on the front side
?

So problem 2 solved, but how to deal with the side splash on top of the granite top is still an ?
 
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Old 01-17-15, 09:18 AM
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OK if I understand correctly there will be gap in the corner of the back and side splash.
My suggestion is take the side splash to a stone mason or granite counter top and see how close they can match it and cut a new piece. Or with some imagination you may be able to work a decorative type of fix.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 09:35 AM
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Let's start over. Don't secure the counter yet.
Two questions:
What kind of edge treatment do you have? Example is beveled or full bullnose.
Does the counter have built-up edges? The overhang is 1-1/4" thick and the rest is 5/8" thick?

Your splash maybe isn't cut short. A standard installation goes like this:

Lay counter on cabinet. Install rear wall splash, install right splash.
Depending on your edge treatment, the splash is not measured to go all the way to the edge of the granite.
For example in your case. If you have a 36" rear backsplash, and a right hand side splash, each will be 3/4" away from edge. 3/4" away from back left, 3/4" away from front right side.

You said on the right side you pushed the vanity to wall minus 1/2" for granite build-up.
The correct way to do it is to place 1/2" or 3/4" strips of wood on top of the vanity. Use hot melt glue. The counter sits on these strips. That way the overhang or "lip" does not interfere with moving or adjusting counter side to side.
Another way to put it is this:
The bottom edge of counter built up edges will be at the same height as vanity face frame and sides.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 09:38 AM
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if I understand correctly there will be gap in the corner of the back and side splash
No. If I leave the vanity as is in the picture (i.e. with the filler strip), then the right side of the granite top will be ~3/4" from the side wall. I could place the side splash in this gap, but then it would NOT be sitting on top of the granite top.

So if I place the side splash on top of the granite (it will be the correct length to just meet the back splash), then along its length I have the 3/4" gap between the side splash and the wall.

So if:

. Side splash to left of top, then incorrect installation as noted by folks, but no gap between side splash and wall.
. Side splash sit on top of vanity top, then correct installation, but now the 3/4" gap between the length of the side splash and wall.

Got time for a quick phone call? If so, send me your # in a private message and I'll call you. Back and forth in a forum is sometimes difficult.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-17-15, 09:49 AM
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See my drawing and let me know if you understand why the vanity needs wood strips on top.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 10:05 AM
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If this is your new vanity top, this is not granite and we are way off track here.
This is laminate and yes, the splash will sit down below counter level and be screwed into the side of main top. That's what the pre-drilled holes are for.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 11:09 AM
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What kind of edge treatment do you have? Example is beveled or full bullnose
.

Eased edge

Does the counter have built-up edges? The overhang is 1-1/4" thick and the rest is 5/8" thick?
No, 2 cm thickness throughout.

Your splash maybe isn't cut short. ... Depending on your edge treatment, the splash is not measured to go all the way to the edge of the granite.
I am expecting the back splash will be 49", the length of the vanity top (but I'll double check). The side splash (if it sits on top of the granite top) will be 22.25" long (the width of the vanity top) less the thickness of the back splash.

So the back splash will run the full length of the vanity top, and the side splash will butt up against the back splash and then run to the front right edge of the top. This assumes they sit on top of the vanity top.

I have the order for the granite top on hold until I understand what to order for the side splash length.

You said on the right side you pushed the vanity to wall minus 1/2" for granite build-up.
Referencing the picture, the vanity is 48" long. There is a vertical filler strip 1.5" against the wall. This allows the vanity door to open to ~90 degrees.

Not thinking, I removed this filler strip and moved the vanity closer to the wall such that the new 49" top would overhang the vanity by 1/2" (on either side), and touch the wall on the right side. Then the right side splash would sit on top of the granite top butted up against the wall. But now the door would only open ~1/3 of the way. Oops!

This led to my original question about where the splashes should sit.

That vertical filler strip is needed. If I install the new top as per the old top with the filler strip, then the 49" top will still overlap the vanity by 1/2" on either side. With the filler strip, it will be ~3/4" away from the wall, just the right depth if the side splash sits along the side of the top. But as noted this is the wrong way to do the install.

So if i sit the side splash on top of the granite top, then I'll have that same 3/4" gap between the back of the side splash and the side wall for the length of the splash. This is not good.

I hope this helps explain my dilemma. So what to do?

The correct way to do it is to place 1/2" or 3/4" strips of wood on top of the vanity. Use hot melt glue. The counter sits on these strips. That way the overhang or "lip" does not interfere with moving or adjusting counter side to side. Another way to put it is this: The bottom edge of counter built up edges will be at the same height as vanity face frame and sides.
Sorry, I do not understand all of this. I saw your picture. If I am correct, the granite top would just sit on op of these strips of wood that are glued to the vanity, and float freely (?) possibly so it could be positioned correctly??

If this is your new vanity top
No, this is the old vanity top. The new granite top will be the same size - 49" x 22.25", but only 2 cm thick.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 12:26 PM
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I have the order for the granite top on hold until I understand what to order for the side splash length
Have they fabricated the top yet? Hopefully not.

If not, reset the cabinet with the 1.5" filler (or more).

Once cabinet is set, measure for top.
Measure front width + 1.75 overhang
Measure right side depth + 1.75 overhang
Measure exact center lines of sinks, measure from right side wall.

Measuring for splashes is hard.
Rear wall splash will be counter width minus the eased edge, which isn't much.
Side splash will be counter depth minus rear backsplash minus eased edge.

The pros cut the splash in the shop a little longer than needed. The splash is then trimmed on site with diamond blade. There are too many variables such as crooked walls to cut a splash perfect in shop.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 12:51 PM
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The top is not fabricated yet, everything is on hold.

The measurements I gave work, i.e. 49" long x 22.25" deep x 2cm thick. No change needed there. Sinks are 12.5" in from each side (centered), so across the length there is 6" (includes 1/2" overhang), 13" L to R for oval sink, 11" between sinks, 13" for 2nd sink, 6" (includes 1/2" overhang) on the right side.

With the vertical filler of 1.5" to allow the door to open, I then have a 3/4" gap between the side of the vanity top and the wall. It will still be there when I install the side splash on top of the granite top.

Yes, I could solve the problem by ordering a 49 3/4" top and then adjusting for the right hand sink being centered. However, this increases the cost of the granite top by ~50%. The top is from US Marble via Home Depot. 49" long is a standard size.

So it looks like I am stuck. Either:

1. install the splashes behind and to the side of the top (the wrong way and the top will then sit out another 3/4" beyond the vanity), or

2. Install the splashes on top of the granite top and have a 3/4" gap to the right of the side splash along its length, or

3. Remove the filler strip, move the vanity and top closer to the right wall, and live with the one door only opening 1/3 of the way.

I just don't see how installing the side (and back) splash on top of the granite top can be done.

I appreciate everyones help. How do I get out of this pickle?
 
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Old 01-17-15, 01:18 PM
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I was afraid you were going to say that. Basically you bought a prefab counter, or got 50% off for size restriction.
The measurements you gave will not work. You need a counter 51-1/4" wide.

Ask whoever is making the top if they can do this:

Keep side splash at 4" high.
Rip down rear splash to approximately 3-3/8" high. (4" minus 2cm)

When installing, place right side splash beside slab and rear backsplash on top.

I would order a new top and pay the extra bucks. You can probably talk them down in price.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 01:31 PM
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The vanity is 48" wide. The vertical filler next to the vanity is 1 1/2". I need 1/2" overhang on either side of the 48".

How did you get to 51 1/4"?

If i can get them to rip the rear splash by ~2cm, then my standard 49" length works with installing the right side splash to the side and the rear on top. No need to get a 51 1/4"

But still would like to know how you got to 51 1/4"

We are close to a solution .

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 01:38 PM
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You're OK.
I got the 51.25 by adding a 1.75 overhang at left, but you don't need that much.
1.75 or minimum 1.5" is standard overhang. If you only want 1/2" on left, that works.

You do not need an overhang at right side. There is nothing to overhang. Splash against wall, counter butts up to that, and whatever's left is your overhang at left side of vanity.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 01:43 PM
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You do not need an overhang at right side. There is nothing to overhang. Splash against wall, counter butts up to that, and whatever's left is your overhang at left side of vanity
.

Agree.

I also think there might be a good chance to get the back splash ripped down without any extra cost. After all, they need to cut it 4" wide, so just cut it 2 cm less.

Too late to stop at HD today. I'll let you know how it goes.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-17-15, 01:50 PM
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Also ask them if you can have a 4" rear splash and increase side splash to 4-5/8" high.

It's the same fix we agree on, but you get a taller splash at back. I think they may work with you, the splash has to be ripped either way you figure it. Insist no extra, they're making money.
 
  #23  
Old 01-17-15, 01:50 PM
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Brian is correct. You need a new counter top proper dimensions. The top should span the whole length of the space provided right to the wall. The top should be cut to accommodate the vanity sink hole without moving it to the edge of the wall. In other words keep the vanity location where it is and make the top fit the opening in the room.

Yes, I could solve the problem by ordering a 49 3/4" top and then adjusting for the right hand sink being centered. However, this increases the cost of the granite top by ~50%. The top is from US Marble via Home Depot. 49" long is a standard size.
This is ridiculous. Can you cancel the order? If so go to a local shop. They should be able to accommodate you without a high cost. When I did my bathroom with a similar problem they made the counter top and backsplash to fit the cabinet and wall space accordingly. And I was able to pick out a granite top from scrap with a reduced price. Most places will offer scrap (left overs from kitchen orders) and custom cut to your size. That is what I did. Not only that but when I said I was going install it myself the sales lady said don't. For just an additional $50 they will check my measurements, deliver it, lift it, fit it and totally install it and they would be responsible for any and all installation, damage to walls, vanity and top. It was a no brainier since it was a 49" slab to be installed in an upper floor.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 02:42 PM
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This is madness, you are trying to custom fit a cabinet with a standard set of items. You already have proven that the math will not work out. You therefore need to build out the section of wall where your void is going to be with something - drywall, wainscoating, chair rail, or something. The backsplash and counter will then sit up to that build up of the wall so that it looks natural. If you can build it out more than the shown void, you could actually make it a little shelf bump out and cap it with a nice piece of oak or something. Three inches or so wide, 1/4" taller than the side splash so that the granite would fit underneath it and look nice.

If you build a bump out, then build it all the way to the floor, to eliminate the fill piece.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 03:00 PM
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This is madness.

This is why you don't buy prefab counters.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 03:11 PM
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Guy's, I think he already knows this. Now we need to help him work with what he has. He has a vanity, but not the top. Lets work from here. Czizzi has a good idea but it seems to involve a bit of work. It all depends on weather the OP can cancel that granite order.

Just for comparison sake. My bathroom vanity granite top cost me $650. Bathroom vanity top: 48” x 22” with 19” dia sink hole only cut-out =1056 sq in = 7.222 sq. ft. This was 5 years ago. That top was 16% of my total cost of remodel. Not a bad price for a custom fit.

What are you paying HD for the vanity top? Does include sink hole, side and back splashes, deliver to the actual room and/or install? Again leave the vanity where it is and get the top to fit the area all the way to the wall.
 
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Old 01-17-15, 03:34 PM
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Thanks Norm,
Let's put this one to bed. See drawing. The top will fit as long as side splash is placed at wall and counter is butted up to it.
This leaves a 1/4" overhang at left. I know it's not ideal but OP wants it to work and this will work.

He can still have 1-1/2" filler, I would recommend 1-1/4"

The side splash being butted up to counter will not look horrific, but a very good caulk job with translucent silicon or tinted silicone is in order.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 11:44 AM
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An update

All,

Based on your feedback, I decided to check with a few local stone places for the cost of a granite counter top that would be the correct length. To my surprise, I found one where I can get a good price in the color we want.

Now as long as I can cancel the Home Depot order, I can get the correct length across the front. I'm not expecting any issues with doing this, but lets wait and see.

So going with a local stone place:

. I'll keep the 1.5' vertical filler on the right side needed to allow the cabinet door to open to 90 degrees.
. The top will be cut long enough to go to the wall.

So 48" wide cabinets + 1.5" overhang on the right side to meet the wall.

Some minor questions:

1. The left side of the vanity is the visible side. What is typically done for the overhang on this side - match the right side (1.5" in my case), or go with something less, for example just 1/2"? Possibly it will look strange if the left side is anything less than the 1.5" on the right side??

2. For the front overhang - what is the standard? 1.5" seems like a lot. Possibly 1" or just 1/2"?

RE: Take a pencil and scribe a line on the drywall at the exact height of the back splash. Remove the back splash and carve out some of the drywall behind where the backsplash will be such that the backslplash can be set into the wall somewhat to account for the wave.

3. What is the best way to carve out this ~1/4' without destroying the 1/2" wallbaord?

Thanks for hanging in there.
 
  #29  
Old 01-26-15, 02:08 PM
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Let the stone fabricator handle all the details. They should come out to measure, center the sink, cut for the faucet holes, and install the splash. They will figure out standards for overhand and cut accordingly. Mention the wave to them and that you would like a little assistance making it look good. Mention the inset idea, but let them do it. It is part of the service provided.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 02:16 PM
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It's best not to think of right side as an overhang. The filler should blend in with cabinet.
You have a 49.5" vanity.
1" is fine at left and front. Normally it is at least 1-1/2", but this is for counters with built-up edges.
To make it easy on yourself: secure cabinet in place, measure width and depth of cabinet and sink centerlines from right wall. Take these measurements to the vendor and you can discuss edge treatments and overhangs.
Also ask about sinks and who will mount them, under mount should be done by granite vendor.

Czizzi got in before me but it's all good advice.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 02:21 PM
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I should explain. I gave all these details because I thought you wanted a prefab counter you will install yourself.
If you are paying for installation, you have to do nothing except secure cabinet
 
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Old 01-26-15, 02:32 PM
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I gave all these details because I thought you wanted a prefab counter you will install yourself.
Yes, I am doing the install myself (well with help from a friend), and the install of the under mount sinks. The place i am purchasing it from will have the holes pre-cut for the clips. So lay the counter, then position and install the sinks.

Having him do the install would double the cost.

Thus my question on how best to cut out for the wave in the wall.
 
  #33  
Old 01-26-15, 02:57 PM
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So they will not be making any measurements at your home? I assume this is true.
I'll get back to you. Most important now is the sink cut outs and faucet boring. They must do this based on your input. The stone vendor will most likely follow a sink manufacturer's cut out instructions using a CNC router. Do you have faucets and sinks (sink model number)?
 
  #34  
Old 01-26-15, 03:07 PM
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After the counter top and sink are installed, then work on the splash.

You will want to lay the splash out, with a pencil scribe a line that represents the top of the splash. Then, with a utility knife, scribe a line that breaks the paper along the line representing the top of the splash about 3 to 4 inches to either side of the stud that is out of line. Take a drywall saw and complete the cut all the way through the drywall. Next, scribe a vertical line on either side of the out of line stud - score with utility knife and cut with drywall saw. Lastly, scrive a line at the top edge of the granite counter and cut that similar to the top line.

Effectively, you have scribed and cut out a sideways "H". Remove the area of drywall that represents where the stud is so that the wings of the "H" can slide past the stud to be more flat.

Install your splash, push it to recess into the wall per your cuts. Clean up your edges that are visible and run a bead of caulk finish. All the "H" cuts and voids should be not visible when the installation is complete.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 03:39 PM
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Do you have faucets and sinks (sink model number)?
Yes, I'll reply Wednesday after the blizzard
 
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Old 01-26-15, 04:02 PM
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I've already covered the measurements for new counter. Czizzi has explained the bow in wall and more.
You should be OK and we'll be here to help.
I was in the Blizzard of '78, I wasn't thinking of installing a counter at that particular time.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 05:14 PM
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Brian - I am from Buffalo, I was in the blizzard, it was 1977, not '78. Although, there was a major ice storm that knocked out things for several days in '78. I was a mere boy of 16 years, and the images of the blizzard are still fresh in my mind. My dad was stuck at work, no cell phones in those days, and we wanted to make sure if he did get home, that he could get into the driveway. My task, was to plow the driveway to keep it clean. I plowed once and hour, every hour just to keep on top of the snow. We had a snow fence to keep drifting snow from covering the driveway. We had to put another snow fence on top when that one buried, and finally had to put a 3rd one on top when the 2nd one buried. Was nonsense and insane the amount of snow. Dad was out for a week before he made it home.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 05:52 PM
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Czizzi,
You're right. I was in Ohio in '78, It was a bad blizzard, I thought it effected the entire area because it was so bad. '77 Buffalo was much worse.
I have a long time friend here from Tonawanda. I think Buffalo has earned the reputation it has for weather. You guys have my respect and everyone prepare.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 07:35 PM
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Ah yes the blizzard of'77. Know it well. I was stuck on the Ridge Road overpass of the I90 in West Seneca. Had to piss so bad. Guy I was helping said to go over the bridge. Not as if anybody could see. I ended up getting back into South Buffalo and pulled into my parents drive when my car completely died. Ten hours on the road. I was 27 years old. My wife and kids spent 5 days by themselves before I was able to get home.
 
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Old 01-29-15, 11:28 AM
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The blizzard was typical NE weather - no big deal.

Again thanks for the input. The place I am buying the top from was just purchased over the last year by a new owner. He has 15 years in the business; he knows his stuff. To have him come out and do the measurement and to have him bring a crew up to install it is too cost prohibitive.

So I am doing the measurement myself (I'll validate it here in about a day), and hiring a friend who has worked with me on my house to install it; he knows construction. We will build an 'A' frame to transport the top back to the house, with the sinks not attached. The holes for the sink clips are drilled out; the clips are supplied. So easy enough (he says) to install the sinks once the counter top is installed.

RE: Do you have faucets and sinks (sink model number)?

The faucet will be a Hansgrohe single hole lav. 1X31701001. The sinks will be Kazza Porcelaain oval sinks – either the KP-09 or KP-10. See pictures.

Each of the cabinets (to be butted up agains each other) is (see picture):

. Inner dimensions - 22 1/2” L x 19 5/16” W
. Outer dimensions – 23 1/2” L x 21” W
. Outer dimensions with the front facing – 24” wide.

The granite top is 1 3/16” thick and will have an eased edge.

I'm leaning toward having a 1” overhang on the left side and front since it is not a built up edge. So this would make the top dimensions:

. Length - 1” overhang on left + 48” + 1 1/2” over the vertical filler on the right side = 50 1/2”.
. Width – 1” overhang + 21” = 23”. Note, the doors on the front jut out 13/16” so with a 1” overhang, it will be 5/16” beyond the door facing. Eventually, I would like to replace these plastic doors with wooden doors.

It appears that I can use either the small or larger sink. With the large sink (17 1/2” inner left-to-right measurement), it appaears I would have (1” + 12” to the center of the cabinet = 13”) less ( * 17 1/2” = 8 3/4”) or 4 1/4” of granite top to the left of the sink.

With the smaller sinl (15” inner left-to-right measurement), it appears I would have (1” + 12” to the center of the cabinet = 13”) less ( * 15” = 7 1/2”) or 5 1/2” of granite top to the left of the sink.

A few questions:

1. Given the top depth of 1 3/16”, would you recommend I go with the smaller or larger bowl? I'm a bit concerned with the top space to the left of the left sink - 4 1/4" vs 5 /12".

2. The front and left side of the top will have an eased edge. Does the backsplash also then have an eased edge on the left front and top front portion, and the right side splash on the right front and top front portion?

3. Czizzi, thanks for the input on how to deal with the bowed wall. Easy enough to do. So the ends of the back splash will sit out 1 3/16” from the wall (the depth of the granite), and the bowed area does not sit all the way back to the stud, so it will run from 3/16” to ” shallower than the ends of the splash.

At this point, I do not know how much will need to be cut out to the left and right of the out of line stud. From a visual perspective, will this look strange with the side splash being the full 1 3/16” out from the wall along its entire length?
 
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