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Roman ogee laminate countertop installation and finish

Roman ogee laminate countertop installation and finish


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Old 01-18-15, 11:23 AM
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Roman ogee laminate countertop installation and finish

1. Inside corner. I do not think that the installer glued the surface between the two counter-top sections. The installer attached the counter-top sections to the wooden blocks in the lower cabinet corners with screws and bolted the counter-top sections together with those specialized counter-top installation bolts. However, I can move the front counter-top edge up and down at the inside corner. I have not caulked the inside counter-top corner. How can stabilize this inside corner and provide a long-lasting, properly finished counter-top?
2. Formica End cap.
a. Should end-caps be installed before allowing the installer to attach the counter-top to the cabinets?
b. Since counter-top installation, I have glued one end cap in place. What tools do I need to cut and finish the edge? I have a RIGID 2910 router but I do not think it will rout the back-splash as the router cannot get close to the edge against the drywall.
 
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Old 01-18-15, 11:28 AM
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Remember you can see it, we can't. Can you post a few pictures of the problem areas, not closeups. Why isn't the installer being called back to do this job? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 01-18-15, 11:44 AM
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Is this the tops that Home Depot sells?
If so there so thin that there should have been 1 X 4's glued and screwed to the tops of the base units before installing the top.
For several reasons:
It gives you more places to attach the top to the cabinets.
It will lift the top enough so it will come out even with the sides of a slide in oven.
Makes it less likely to hit the tops of the drawers.

Yes there should have been glue in the seam.
Yes the end caps get installed and finished before the top gets mounted.
Easiest way is with a trim router with a special laminate round over bit.
 
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Old 01-18-15, 01:18 PM
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There are so many things wrong it's not funny.
Did you pay a home center to install this counter? If so, they need to come back and do it right.
The inside corner I assume is the 45 cut at where two runs meet. It should be glued with waterproof glue, then the dog bones are tightened. You should be able to drag your fingernail across the joint and get no catches. Joint does not get caulked and be reasonably unnoticed, depending on color.
The end caps can be routed, but it takes a special router attachment to get within 3/4" of wall. Most installers probably do not own this attachment. They can be filed, but it takes a plastic cut file and experience.
Long story short: If you paid for this counter and install it needs to be redone. Make it clear you want their best guy to return for service.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 09:50 AM
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I bought these stock counter-tops at a big box store. The installer is not available to complete this counter-top. I will need to complete the installation myself. I hope these images help.
Name:  150121CounterTop Endcap east Far.jpg
Views: 3059
Size:  26.9 KB East end view showing that the countertop is shimmed. The gap between the wall and backsplash is the caused by the crooked wall corner. I do not think we can change this.
Name:  150121CounterTop Endcap East close.jpg
Views: 2747
Size:  22.5 KB East end close-up
Name:  150121CounterTop Inside corner far.jpg
Views: 3282
Size:  26.8 KB I can move the closest edge where to two pieces meet 1/16 inch up and down. Do you think tightening the dog-bones will get it tight enough so I will not have to remove the shorter of the two pieces and bolt them back together with glue?
Name:  150121CounterTop Insidecorner close.jpg
Views: 2780
Size:  24.9 KB Here is the close-up of the 45 degree inside corner
Name:  150121CounterTop North of stove endcap not installed Close.jpg
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Size:  22.2 KB North of stove. End-cap not installed
Name:  150121CounterTop South of stove endcap installed but not finished far.jpg
Views: 2258
Size:  28.3 KB This is the only end-cap I have installed. I do not have a specialized router to finish the edge so will try to cut the end-cap and file it with a plastic cut file. Is there a specialized knife for cutting the end-cap?
 
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Old 01-22-15, 10:46 AM
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You have quite a job there. Let's start with the easy stuff and move to the hard.
The range:
I work on a lot of kitchens and some people insist the range be flush with counter. I don't agree.
Range should sit a little above counter, let's say 1/2". So if the range sides are missing end caps, forget them. Raise and level range, the ends of counter won't be seen.

The dog bones are tough. You will need access to them and you will need two people to adjust them. Apply glue with brush and quickly work from underneath. One person will tighten dog bones, other will tap on counter with wood block and hammer, trying to get joint as flush as possible.

Here's bad news: If you want a good joint and you can't fully access dog bones:
Entire counter will need to be raised. You can do this with short sections of 1 x 6's along back wall,
1 x 6's stacked on edge along front edge.
You will glue and tighten joint, let it dry. Then using several people, try to remove blocking and lay it back down without putting stress on joint. The joint with glue and dog bones will be pretty hard to break.

The wall gap is huge. You can't leave it like that. You will have to compromise by cutting out drywall on left and having an acceptable gap at right. Your only alternative is to have the joint recut at proper angle and dog bone slots recut. This would have to be done in a laminate shop and will probably cost more than the counter did.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 07:54 PM
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Thanks for all the suggestions.
 
 

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