So many bathroom questions!


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Old 04-03-15, 12:13 AM
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So many bathroom questions!

When we put the drywall up in the bathroom, does it go all the way to the tile on the floor? What keeps it from wicking up any spilled water? I think I may be missing something here.

Dumb question I know but it's keeping me awake tonight.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-03-15, 12:32 AM
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Actually not a dumb question. I'm pretty sure you should leave a 1/2" gap between the sheetrock and the floor.

What are you planning to put over the sheetrock.... paint ?
Are you using greenboard there ?
 
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Old 04-03-15, 12:56 AM
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I will be using the special green stuff that goes in bathrooms. Do I need the stuff that I use in the tub area for ALL the walls in the bathroom? Or would the other stuff be ok on the vanity walls etc? I plan to paint the walls. Had too many years of small pink tile surrounding all walls in the bathroom. I'm boycotting. So what closes the gap between wall and floor tile?
Is there something that's supposed to go between the drywall and the paint?
 
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Old 04-03-15, 04:43 AM
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Is there something that's supposed to go between the drywall and the paint?
Primer

You said you had tiles. Keep in mind you can't use sheetrock in wet areas, so if you have a shower in that tub area, you will need a plan B to contain the water splash.....like tile. Fill us in on the wet area.

Depending on your choice, you can use either rubber sanitary glued up base, regular wooden base molding, or tile base at the bottom of the wall to cover the gap.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 05:21 AM
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IMO greenboard is outdated and doesn't need to be used. Primer and a coat or two of latex enamel [bath paint is even better] will give the drywall all the protection it needs. The wet areas need to have cement board under the tile! It's pretty standard to leave a 1/2" gap at the bottom of the drywall, baseboard will hide that gap.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 03:47 PM
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There will be tile in the tub surround only Ė the three sides. Everything else will be painted. I didnít even think about base molding. Does that scare you for how well this will turn out?

I need to educate myself on sheetrock, greenboard and drywall and how each is used. Believe me I only want to do this once. I should mention that my SO is doing a LOT of the work here. He totally gutted his kitchen and redid everything so he knows what heís doing. Itís just that Iím a bit of a semi-control freak and need to know whatís happening. If something goes wrong it will be MY fault.

Tomorrow starts the DEMO!!!!!

I canít tell you how much I appreciate your input.
 
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Old 04-03-15, 05:18 PM
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As Marksr said, the three sides of the tub will be concrete backer underlayment in 1/2". This will blend with the sheetrock where it meets at the terminus of the edge of the tub. Keep us posted with pictures if you prefer.
 
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Old 04-04-15, 04:28 AM
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Sheetrock is a brand name of drywall and is often used generically. Drywall comes in 4 thicknesses, 1/4", 3/8",1/2" and 5/8" with 1/2" being the most common. Often 5/8" is preferred for ceilings especially if the ceiling joist spacing is greater than 16" [1/2" is prone to sag on 24" centers]

The properties that make green drywall moisture resistant also make it harder for the paint to develop a good bond with it. Latex enamels will repel moisture and if the moisture gets below the paint - you have bigger problems.

Remodeling a bath rm isn't overly complicated. No matter what you run in to there is someone here who's been there, done that so all you have to do is ask and we can guide you in the right direction.
 
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Old 04-06-15, 05:27 AM
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Update on bathroom demo - First weekendl

First weekend of bathroom demo. Tough work. Behind the 1958 built tile was 2 layers of drywall stuff, some heavy wire mesh and mortar. Getting through the wire mesh was a bummer. HEAVY stuff coming off the wall. I'm using the Bagster bags for disposal of the waste. Working on the second bag just because of the weight. One wall left to do - the one with the shower head on it.
Now that the tile is off the wall I have a 1-1/2 inch gap between the studs and the tile on the floor. New drywall will probably be 1/2 inch thick. That leaves my floor tile 1 inch away from the wall once it's up. Didn't even think about that part of it. So now do I tear up the floor and put new tile on the floor or do I do some decorative thing around the outside. I saved some of the floor tile when we installed it but not enough to totally redo the floor.
Definitely more dust than I anticipated. Good thing I dusted and vacuumed before we started. Starting a "What I with I knew before" list.
Fortunately no surprises behind the walls. Most of this is being done when b/f is off work so it's going to be slow going. We put the toilet back in for use in the meantime. Everyone else is going to have to come back to shower in master bath during reconstruction.

marksr - sounds like I would be better off not using green drywall except for tile area around the tub/shower. Is there something I should do to the drywall to make paint more adhesive?

I took pics but having trouble uploading.
 
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Old 04-06-15, 05:33 AM
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Marksr is getting coffee. NO, absolutely NO drywall behind tile area. Concrete backer underlayment.
 
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Old 04-06-15, 05:33 AM
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No need to use green board. You need to use cement board behind the tile that makes up the tub surround, regular drywall is fine for the rest. Your call on the floor tile I'm sure the right tile would look fine as a decorative border although there might be some tedious clean up work along the edge to make the new tile butt up to the old.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 05:49 AM
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Unhappy I give up

I realize now that I took on more than I can chew. Redoing a whole bathroom just doesn't seem to be something I can handle on my own even with the help of all you guys and my S/O.

So now, after a week of cleaning the dust up to my ears from demolition and not being able to sleep I need to turn this whole thing over to someone. And I still need your help for that.

I need someone to coordinate the whole thing. I have everything picked up or on order to go back in but need someone to coordinate all the different professions to get everything back in. Where do I find this person? Would it be a contractor? bath designing company? I don't personally know anyone to get referrals from.

I hate to but I give up. This, for me, is one of those things better left for the professionals.

Thank you so much for all your help. You are always right here to encourage and answer questions no matter how dumb. I'd still like to post before and after pics when I figure out how to do it.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 05:52 AM
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Got any "now" pictures? Let us look at what you have.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 07:23 AM
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I'd still like to post before and after pics when I figure out how to do it.
Here you go -
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...rt-images.html
 
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Old 04-12-15, 09:05 AM
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Thanks for the How to czizzi -

Here are the pics of bathroom in it's current state.

This is the last area to bring down. It plus the tub
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Outside wall is on the left
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Vanity goes here
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This pic shows new space between current floor tile and where the sheetrock will be. So now I have to figure out how to make up that new half inch or so that's exposed where the wall used to be thicker with the mortar they used back then.
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Oops!
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Old 04-12-15, 09:38 AM
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90% of the back breaking work is done.

Hopefully, you put a stopper in the tub drain to keep debris out.

Don't remove the bath tub, have it re-glazed after you have finished installing your new tile. As far as the gap to match the doors, just add some wood slats to the current studs to build it out so that sheet rock will again work in your situation.

What was your gameplan before you got discouraged? I think you can still continue. It's not an overnight task. Keep it slow and steady and you can make it to the end and keep some money in your pocket.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 10:26 AM
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That's the problem. It's not just not an overnight task - it's a month and month task. Especially when there's maybe one day a week to work on it. I don't think I can live with it. I cant get a grip on what all needs to be done let alone what comes first, second, etc.
I like the idea of adding wood slats to current studs. What a concept!!! - See? it's things like that that there's no way I can come up with those things. We've broken some tile that needs to be replaced (fortunately I have extra from original layout). I've just gotten so discouraged.
I was going to have us finish the demo, then figure out what to do with the floor tile problem (now solved) and then go for the plumber to install the tub and tub fixtures. I'm just not going to have us do that part. Plumbing is my big nemesis. After that, the small electrical adjustments (adding one outlet) and the walls going up. New toilet in. Contract out the tub tiling. Install the vanity and have the countertop measured and put on. Hook up sink faucet. Put up medicine cabinet over vanity -maybe want to do that before the top goes on. Attach new light fixture. Run a hot bath in my nice new soaker tub and relax.
Oh - and somewhere in there fix the wall where my son got overanxious demolishing.
Geez it all sounds so easy until I start detailing what each step involves.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 11:15 AM
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It IS easy if you watch home shows a lot. They demo an entire bathroom in 30 seconds. But as Z said, most of the hard work is done. Once you finish your demo and you have a clean slate to work with, you will be in a better position to see what you want to take on yourself.

Take down the closet door and frame, remove all the really pretty pink tile (couldn't find a puke emoticon). If it were mine, I would like to see a fully framed wall at the tail of the tub. It would entail a little frame adjustment at the head, but you can insulate the area and deal with electrical (if any) in that entire wall all the way across.

That appears to be a cast iron tub, and I would, likewise, protect it (not with a shovel and crap) from scratching and reuse it, having it glazed in place once all the dust settles. Tape some 1/2" blue foam on the bottom and inside as well as top and outslde.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 12:54 PM
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I can't believe you don't like my pink tile. I have had pink tile in bathrooms for the last 30 years or so. nothing you can do to hide it.

the whole point of the bathroom redo was to get rid of the tub and put in a comfortable soaking tub. You guys are saying to leave it in? but then again, how often am I going to have time for a nice soak. I also heard that deglazing a tub doesn't always work or look good.

What is a fully framed wall at the tail of the tub? are you saying to move the tub away from the outside wall and partly into the closet? All electricity is on vanity and entrance door walls. Does the little frame adjustment at the head of the tub include moving all the plumbing that's right there and the drain too?

Are you saying to leave the closet open? or is the framing removal just temporary?
 
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Old 04-12-15, 01:07 PM
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A new tub will need new plumbing as the chances of the drain lining up perfectly are iffy. The full frame along the back wall will allow for the insertion of insulation for a more comfy bathroom.

Re-glazing, if done correctly, will change the pink tub to white and apply a new factory finish. As long as you don't bathe a large dog in the re-glazed tub, it should last a good long time (nails can scratch the surface). Have a professional do it, don't attempt the DIY kits you can find at the box stores. The pro should acid etch, degloss, prime and then reglaze to a new white finish. Takes about a day to complete and then 3 to harden. Just giving you options to save you some money. Re-glaze = ~ $400 and a new tub will run up to a couple of thousand $ after you get done with the plumber.
 
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Old 04-12-15, 01:26 PM
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While I don't know much about them, you can also get 'inserts' that go over the existing tub giving it a new surface. When reglazing a tub - proper prep is key!
 
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Old 04-12-15, 01:38 PM
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holy cow. Reglazing is sounding not so bad. Just a couple of toddlers in addition to the adults using the tub. definitely if done it would be professionally. Using the old tub would preclude the full frame back wall right? I still don't understand the concept. is it putting 2x4s there and then the concrete backer stuff like a regular inside wall?
If I remember correctly I was quoted somewhere around $500 to have the tub and fixtures installed. Not including tub cost. Wouldn't that include moving the drain if needed?

now I am finding a small puddle of water seeping out from the edge of an end tile. It's to the side of the toilet and over the drainage pipes. Could bringing down the walls have ruined 60 year old pipes under the tiled tarazzo floor? I don't see any dripping or dampness except for the side of the tile. Comes back after drying it up.

And I wonder why I am discouraged.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 06:23 AM
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Don't give up on me yet!

Update on the bathroom!!

it's been slow going since we have very little time to do it ourselves BUT

1) We ended up pulling up the floor tile and BF got the cast iron tub out all in one piece! We are down to the studs.

2) Tub is in, electrical is done - new outlet, new ceiling light and new vanity fixture. Plumbing is done for the tub (had someone come in and do it for us). BF updated the shut-off valves and got sink plumbing up-to-date.

3) Half of the walls are up. Now that the tub is in our next step is to get the Wonderboard lite up in the tub/shower area.

4) need to talk to tile installers to find the right one to do the tub area.

So - we're making progress even though it's slow. Feeling much better about it now that I believe that as long as we have it done by Christmas, I'll be fine.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 06:14 PM
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Cool We're ready for tub walls!

We're using wonder board light in the tub area. Special screws are needed, right? Different than the ones we used for the green board. Right? Isn't there a special mortar needed also?

Also, do we need a hydro barrier kind of thing or is just doing the tape/mud thing enough?


We're progressing! . I am so excited! Thanks for all help as always. I keep coming up with more questions.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 06:17 PM
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what in particular should we use for the mud?
 
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Old 05-25-15, 07:12 PM
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Use Durock screws. Be sure to install 6 mil vapor barrier behind it. Use modified thinset and alkali resistant mesh tape on all your joints.
 
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Old 05-25-15, 07:28 PM
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yeah Chandler! you come through for me again. Thank you!
 
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Old 05-26-15, 12:39 AM
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Thumbs up

Behind the 1958 built tile was 2 layers of drywall stuff, some heavy wire mesh and mortar. Getting through the wire mesh was a bummer. HEAVY stuff coming off the wall.

Now that the tile is off the wall I have a 1-1/2 inch gap between the studs and the tile on the floor. New drywall will probably be 1/2 inch thick. That leaves my floor tile 1 inch away from the wall once it's up.
This was common in older homes to allow the tile to stand away from the wall to give it depth (along with bull-nose top cap tiles).

To me, the new way (more common/cheaper) method of laying tiles flat against the drywall/tile backer gives a very cheap and boring look.

Can you tell that I am overly anal?
 
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Old 05-29-15, 04:48 AM
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Question on the 6 mil barrier now that we are ready to get those walls up:
Is all 6 mil vapor barrier the same? As in for tub surround and floors? Or is there a special one for tub areas?
And that seems to be the preferred way to go rather than the hydro paint barrier thing?
Thanks again -
 
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Old 05-29-15, 05:43 AM
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Any 6 mil poly will work, I use 15# felt paper layered in a shingle pattern (bottom piece first overlay the top piece). Make sure that the bottom overhangs the tub tile flange and the corners have a good overlay to the next wall without seam at the corner. Use staples to tack it in place till the cement board is installed. Then trim the bottom overhang.
 
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Old 06-05-15, 06:31 PM
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It's gettinexcitig now!!

Finally seeing progress.
All walls are up. Is there supposed to be a seal between the Wonderboard and tub? Do we caulk that area? Or do we leave that open and let the tile be the water barrier there?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 06-05-15, 07:28 PM
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Different ways of doing it. I like to leave the vapor barrier long, bring the cbu to the top of the tub flange, cut the vb 1/4" below the bottom of the cbu, then tile the wall. The tile will jump the gap just fine. Since there will not be any chance of water leeching up to the cbu, I usually don't silicone the bottom joint between the tile and tub. No mildew, no dirt. Just one way of doing it.
 
 

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