How to hide range hood vent duct?


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Old 04-15-15, 06:29 AM
J
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How to hide range hood vent duct?

I need to install an undercabinet range hood in my kitchen because the one I have now is ductless. Was planning on removing the one that is currently there and since it's an interior wall I was planning on making a hole through the cabinet and then through the kitchen ceiling and then a hole on the roof and install the roof vent. My question is, since there is about a 2 feet of space between the kitchen cabinet and the kitchen ceiling, what is the best way to hide the round duct ? Should I frame a box out of 2x4 and finish it with drywall, or should I try to keep it accessible for future maintenance/problems?
 
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Old 04-15-15, 07:36 AM
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For better ideas post a picture of where it needs to go.
There just is no reason I can think of to leave it exposed.
 
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Old 04-15-15, 09:33 AM
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I agree with Joe, unless you are going for an industrial look there is no reason to not box in the duct. You DO want to use the duct in the longest pieces you can to reduce the number of joints and you DO need to properly seal those joints.
 
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Old 04-15-15, 12:36 PM
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Usually the duct is housed either behind drywall or with panels to match/compliment the cabinetry.
 
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Old 04-15-15, 07:41 PM
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Here is a few pictures of the current setup with the ductless range hood, basically I was going to through the cabinet all the way up to the ceiling and through attic then roof in a straight line, maybe about 3-4 feet of duct at the most.
 
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Old 04-15-15, 08:49 PM
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The narrow cabinet door on the right of your picture may be a solution. If you can get another one you can create a fake cabinet above the the wood cabinet by running it horizontally.

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Your cabinet door colors don't seem to match or is that the camera. I will admit my mock up doesn't look good so maybe not a good idea for that specific door but a cabinet shop could probably make a door like panel.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 04-15-15 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 04-16-15, 04:37 AM
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I'd consider staining some oak plywood to match the cabinets and using that to box it in.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 05:34 AM
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How big should the box be around the duct should I take as little room as possible?


As for the range hood what CFM would you guys recommend? I hate smelling ordors throughout the house so I want to make sure I pick the right one from the start. What size duct should I run, 6"?
 
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Old 04-16-15, 05:37 AM
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Usually the 'box' is just big enough to enclose the duct work but since it's so close to the corner, it might look better to make the box the same width as the cabinet below it.

I don't what cfm would be best isn't duct size determined by the unit's specs?
 
 

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