Another hardibacker vs durock thread....


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Old 05-21-15, 07:22 AM
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Another hardibacker vs durock thread....

Greetings all, this is my first shower remodel and I have it all torn down to the studs. I've gotten mixed responses/search results from my basic questions.

I'm going to be using synthetic/engineered marble slabs for the shower walls.

Remember this is for shower walls, not tile floors:

1)Hardibacker or durock under the slabs?

2)Will the eng marble adhere better to one vs the other? One thought of mine is the cement board is only as strong as the paper attached to it, will the weight of the syn marble pull at that over time?

3)studs/vapor barrier/hardi or durock/slabs OR studs/hardi or durock/thinset over seams/slabs

Those are the main questions I have at this time, I'll add as I think of them

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-21-15, 11:41 AM
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cement board is only as strong as the paper attached to it
Um, cement board doesn't have any paper attached to it. It is cement with a mesh covering embedded in it. Hardiebacker is a fiber cement product. Drywall/Sheetrock is gypsum covered with paper. The paper can break down in the presence of moisture and is not used in wet locations.

What glue you will use will determine what substrate is best. Are you having the cultured marble walls fabricated for you or are you purchasing some form of a kit? Floor to ceiling full panels? Is the base custom made? or off the shelf? Does the base have a tile flange on it?

Make sure your walls are perfectly square and plumb and straight without wave. There is no fudging a crooked corner with a perfectly rectangular slab of stone. The stone will not bend around a stud that is out of alignment and standing proud of the others.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 02:00 PM
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Thanks for the reply. I did not realize there was no paper attached to cement board, so thank you for that clarification.

I am having the slabs custom made for us, not quite floor to ceiling, about 6.5 feet up from the base. I'm going to be using a prefab shower base with a tile flange.

The company making the slabs just recommended using silicone to attach them to whatever we use be it hardibacker or durock
 
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Old 05-27-15, 03:45 PM
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So I've decided on and purchased the cement board. I've shimmed the studs and made sure they're plum. The only remaining thing before putting the slabs up is how to waterproof it.

1) studs/vapor barrier/cement board/slabs

or

2) studs/cement board/mesh tape and thinset over the seams/slabs

If I do #2, I know generally with tile, you put the thinset and meshtape over the entire surface of the cement board...but with full slabs that have no chance of leakage in the center, would I need that much, or would just doing the seams be sufficient?

Keep in mind all walls are inside walls
 
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Old 06-14-15, 07:47 PM
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Your option #1 is one of the two main ways to do it. #2 is not, because mesh and thinset do not waterproof. For that matter, #1 doesn't either, but a vapor barrier (such as roofing felt, etc.) does its job. If you want a second option for over the concrete board, then you'll need to do something like Redgard or a similar paintable membrane, although I don't know about adhesion to large panels with that. You might want to research Redgard and similar options and then decide between that and your first option.
 
 

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