Best laid plans....


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Old 06-11-15, 06:30 AM
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Best laid plans....

Bought a new refrigerator. All the latest features and the wife loves it. Two days prior to delivery we empty out old one and give it to son-in-law down the street. Two days later new unit arrives. Low and behold it does not fit!

It's 1/2" too big. We thought we measured accurately. Anyway I decided to take out base cabinet and two top cabinets and relocate. That went well with the help of my two sons. Relocated in just and hour. I now need to cut flooring and re-cut all crown molding and add spacer to make up space. But the big challenge is the granite counter top needs to be re-cut. It over hangs the entrance way by about 3". Can this be done? Or do I need to buy a new top altogether?


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Old 06-11-15, 06:42 AM
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The 36" refrigerators measure 35-1/2" normally. The sides will be bowed sometimes though, adding a little width.

You can cut the granite on the inside (reefer) edge. Use an angle grinder with diamond blade.
It is surprisingly easy to slice through.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 07:04 AM
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You can also use a diamond blade in a circular saw. I would take the slab outside and cut on the fridge side like Handyone mentioned. That way the cut does not have to be so pretty and you don't have to worry about polishing it. It helps if you have a helper with a squirt bottle of water to spray on the blade and cut area to keep the blade cool and cut down on dust. Then I use a diamond blade in a angle grinder to slightly bevel the edges to remove the sharp corner. A carborundum disk will also work for slight touch up and smoothing.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 07:10 AM
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Dane brings up a good point, the dust is massive.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 07:10 AM
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I too would use a circular saw. Easier to control IMO and more importantly you can secure a straight board to the counter top with double face tape or clamps to guide the saw.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 10:00 AM
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You will be cutting from the bottom and one point to watch out for is the very last 1/2 inch. If it is under any tension, it will break and may take a corner with it. Once your saw id 1/3 of the way through, secure the cut side with wood/clamps and or glue. Then when you reach 2/3 secure the middle. You want those last few inches to have zero tension on them.

Maybe I'm overly cautious, but just cutting Formica can can have the same problem. Maybe others can suggest better.

Bud
 
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Old 06-11-15, 06:42 PM
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Thanks guys for all the suggestions. I have one of those DUALSAWs that were advertised like crazy several years back. The one with the dual blades that revolve in opposite directions. I've cut many a tile, brick, ceramic and porcelain with it with great accuracy and success. But I never considered cutting granite with it. I would need to buy new diamond blades since mine are pretty well worn.



After reading all of the responses from Brian, PD and Ray I was all excited about doing it myself. Then I read Bud's response and cautions and that put me off. Although I would really like to try it I only have one chance at it. I think a pro might be in order on this one. The local stone and counter top company told me they do not do that sort of work but gave me the name of an independent who does. I'll call him and see what he thinks and get an estimate from him.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 06:58 PM
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Sorry to pour water on your excitement, but better to have all the cards on the table. That said, I would do the cutting in a heart beat.

And you do have enough overhang to do a little practicing.

Let's see if others feel the cautions I raised are really a concern.

Bud
 
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Old 06-11-15, 07:22 PM
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Bud, don't be sorry. You just showed me the realty of the situation. There are two sides to every action. The actual cutting doesn't scare me so much as the cracking at the end. The other problem is the back splash. That will need to be cut with out breaking off or detaching it (I think).

If i screwed this up my wife would never forgive me. Several years ago just her and I remodled this whole kitchen ourselves. From carpentry, cabinets, tiling, electrical, plumbing, flooring, painting, crown molding to all the trim. The only the only thing we did not do was install the granite counter top. We are very proud of our job and know we did a better job than any professionals would've done and at less than half the cost.

Anyway, I'll see what this guy has to say. If it's too expensive then I'll risk it myself. For such a small piece I can always buy another. And since it's not next to the other counter top it won't need to be an exact match.
 
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Old 06-12-15, 06:15 AM
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Back splash should just be glued down usually with a good quality calk. Comes off pretty easy and will cut the same way. Lay counter on a piece of ply wood and cut it that way, Will support it and won.t break last part.
 
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Old 06-12-15, 06:34 AM
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Thanks pugsi,
With the backsplash off, cutting from top (front to back) would leave any small breakaway at the bottom back corner where it would not be seen. The curve of the circular saw works in your favor. Do the same with the backsplash and you should be all set.

Bud
 
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Old 06-21-15, 06:52 PM
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Just a follow up and conclusion to the cutting of granite counter top. The guy that was going to cut the counter top never showed on the appointed day.
Several days latter just as I was ready to buy new blades and cut the counter top myself, the guy I shows up said he was ready to do it that night. I said OK just to get it out of the way. I'm glad I did. He did a fantastic job and even suggested to not cut the back splash but instead just slide it behind the fridge. Looks a lot better that way. He added a slight bevel to the cut edge so as not to be sharp and possibly chip. Although he did not polish the edge, he did do a great job of smoothing it out. I think the $100 was well spent!
 
 

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