Shower wall to drywall transition problem


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Old 10-17-15, 09:45 AM
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Shower wall to drywall transition problem

Hi guys,
It looks like I have a big problem here!

You are looking at the wall opposite the plumbing wall.
The curved lip on the new shower base means that I need to build out the shower wall here by about 1/4 inch. This will make this wall bump out where it meets the drywall.

What can I do here?

Thanks
Tbone

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  #2  
Old 10-17-15, 12:02 PM
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You are going to have to add some nailing surfaces anyway to accept the cement backer board. Most likely 1/2" backer will bridge the gap and allow you to tile over the flange. This should put your backer and drywall at the same level and you bridge the gap with your bullnose tile.

Looks as though you already installed the base. Run a cross block across the upper part of the seat to accept the cement backer as it turns the corner.
 
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Old 10-17-15, 01:22 PM
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czizzi,
I am afraid I don't understand.

Let me quickly mention one thing: I got lucky and picked up some Wedi boards at heavily discounted prices and cost only marginally more than cbo. It's a lot easier to work with and is 1/2 inch thick.

So, when I mount the board flat against the studs, the board will be flush with the adjacent drywall. But it won't go over the flange. In fact, the flange and board faces are almost flush.

But, if I push out the board by 1/4 inch, I can rabbit out the back of the board and have the board go over the flange. But, at the drywall transition, this board will be bumped out by 1/4 inch.

Could I just ignore it? It is not like people are going to be walking by this wall or anything like that. It's not in a noticeable location.
 
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Old 10-17-15, 04:42 PM
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Doesn't matter what kind of backer you use, as long as you use backer board. Refer to this schematic. The backer does not cross the flange. the tile bridges the gap. The backer and drywall are on the same plane.

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Old 10-18-15, 07:47 AM
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Thank you czizzi. The diagram makes it very clear.
 
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Old 10-18-15, 08:19 AM
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I would also note that if it was me, I would add nailing surfaces to take pressure off your backerboard to give a more solid surface. All backer board will flex, it will flex more near the edges, blocking will give hold it steady and prevent it from moving in relation to the very rigid base. I realize that the base is already installed. I would install cross blocks as indicated. The vertical stud would be nice, but not necessary as you have another stud right there. It would serve more to keep the "base" steady vs the backerboard (just the opposite).

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Old 10-18-15, 09:48 AM
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czizzi,
Sure thing, I will add cross bars as you have drawn.
How about a few more cross blocks higher up ...at least until 6 feet off the ground where there is possibility for unexpected human impact ?

I have added some extra blocks already on the long side and plumbing wall for installing grab bars. Plus the 2x6 (on it's side) you see in the photo was also added for hanging a glass door which I gather can be quite heavy.
 
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Old 10-18-15, 11:07 AM
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How is the 2x6 anchored? I would toenail 16d nails in from the double studs to the right every 6 to 8 inches. On the left, I would run 4" deck screws through the single stud and bridge the gap to the 2x6, again every 6 to 8 inches.

Take good measurements of your blocking for the grab bars and remember to subtract the thickness of the tile and backerboard when trying to locate the blocks after the walls are up and finished. Add as much extra blocking as you want, more certainly will not hurt. However, I would at the least do the ones outlined above.
 
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Old 10-18-15, 11:31 AM
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The 2x6 is anchored with 4 3.5 inch deck screws - 2 at the top and 2 in the bottom.
It's certainly not going anywhere, but I'll go ahead and put in more screws along the length.

On the opposite side, there were 2 studs 1.5 inch apart where the door will go. I squeezed in another 2x4 in that gap and used deck screws at the top and bottom and a couple along the length.

I know what you are going to say, czizzi I'll go ahead and screw that in too at 8 inch intervals.

Yes, I have 2 pages in my notebook full of all the measurements & positions about the blocks for grab bars and doors. These pages are so full of numbers & diagrams that I have a hard time understanding it myself.

It does look like I now have wood than empty space in these shower walls!
 
 

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