Bathroom remodel

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-19-15, 07:39 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Bathroom remodel

I am new to this forum but have been on other forums for years.
I know that everyone likes pictures.
So before I post a bunch I want to make sure this is the right place.

The Details.
1997 Manufactured House aka Trailer House

The problem.
Cheap tub surround leaked. Silicone repair didn't work.
Mildew/mold on floor and into studs. Sheetrock mostly removed already.

The Fix.
Redo the whole thing. That is why I am here. I looked around for a while to find a forum that is big enough and active enough to get help as I go along.
The remodel includes new metal tub, tile shower surround, heated tile floor, new vanity/top, new sheetrock/tape/texture/paint, remove texture from ceiling/paint,and rest of details new.

Budget.
Hoping for less than $2000 by doing all the work myself. If it gets to $3000 I am alright with that. I was quoted $14,700 by a contractor. More details of that later.

The Timeframe.
Two weeks. I have the next 2 weeks of vacation so hope to be done before I have to go back to work.

My experience level.
Meh. I hate working with wood. I would rather work with metal because it is much easier to weld back together after a screw up. I give myself 7 out of 10 for Automotive type stuff but 4 out of 10 for Construction. But I will get this done.

Tools.
I will have to buy or borrow tile saw and miter saw. Will buy tools for grout/tile as needed. Rest of everything I should have.


Cliffs: Is this the right place to blog this project?


One pic for now till I am sure were to put this.

Well it isn't working so next post i will go figure out how to do pics here.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-19-15, 07:42 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts


edit: This is an overview of the bathroom. I clicked post before pic details.
 

Last edited by NVBubba; 11-19-15 at 07:50 AM. Reason: clicked to fast
  #3  
Old 11-19-15, 07:52 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

Blogs are against the forum rules, do you have specific questions?
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
Announcements - Designing Kitchens and Bathrooms
 
  #4  
Old 11-19-15, 08:08 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Blog may have been the wrong word. I just want t put all the pictures and questions in one thread to make it easier to follow along when the next question comes up.

My first question is about order of work.
Obviously teardown to studs is first, then mildew removal/abatement is next. But then should I set the tub or start on floor or sheetrock?
 
  #5  
Old 11-19-15, 09:10 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
The tub normally gets installed after the framing and rough plumbing is done. Flooring is usually done after the walls are finished.
 
  #6  
Old 11-19-15, 09:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,438
Received 25 Votes on 21 Posts
What's there now for a subfloor?
Most older mobile homes used partical board.
That would all need to come out down to the joist.
What size are the floor joist?
 
  #7  
Old 11-19-15, 03:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes particle board.
I was hoping to not have to remove it. Not sure on joist spacing yet.







 

Last edited by NVBubba; 11-19-15 at 04:15 PM. Reason: add pics
  #8  
Old 11-19-15, 04:18 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
These pics are a few days old, will have updated pics later tonight after down to studs.
 
  #9  
Old 11-19-15, 11:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well I had another reply earlier but I guess it didn't get posted. I messed that up somehow

The floor is particle board. I think the joist are 2x8s. I really was wanting to do this without changing the floor, but it is looking like it is going to have to be changed. But what do I replace it with?

Here's the pics.

I didn't get the faucet removed yet because I have to figure out exactly what kind of pipe I have. Then I can get some valves or caps for it while I work on everything up to that point.

This is the window surround. It is plastic laminated on particle board. What do I use to replace it? The window is screwed in from the outside on the siding. The particle board has a few small nails in it from the looks of it. I am pretty sure if I cut the silicone carefully I can get the surround out.






 
  #10  
Old 11-20-15, 06:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have replied twice to this thread and posted pics. Not sure why neither reply is here??

I'll try again.

Left Side


right side


I'm only going to do 2 pics ata atime to see if that will get these on here.
 
  #11  
Old 11-20-15, 06:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This window case needs replaced.
The window is attached on the outside of the house to the paneling. I am thinking I can remove the case from the inside without messing up the window itself. I will carefully cut the silicone and try to get the small nails removed.





Because it is just plastic laminated pressboard I am not sure what to replace it with?? Any suggestions.
 
  #12  
Old 11-20-15, 07:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The floor joists are 2x6 or maybe more accurately 2ish x 5 1/4", typical trailer crap.
The floor is particle board. What do I replace it with? What do I do at the edges because the walls are on the joists?
I have been thinking how to do it and the best I can come up with is Nail or screw a 2x4 along the current joists to get it where I can put my floor on it. Then on the ends of the floor put the 2x4s between the joists.

I sprayed everywhere I could last night with some mold killer. I will spray again later today with bleach/water to kill everything, after I get the tub faucet removed. Do I need to paint over it to seal it? Suggestions?

And a couple more pics



And a before pic I tried posting earlier but it didn't work.

 
  #13  
Old 11-20-15, 09:19 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Most MHs use 5/8" PB. I'd cut out what PB I could and replace it with 5/8" plywood and then add another layer of plywood over it all to get the stiffness you'll need for the tile. I don't think the 2x6 joist will be too big of deal since they are supported by the MH's steel frame. You do want to make sure the outside edge of the floor is good and stout!
 
  #14  
Old 11-20-15, 11:39 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I got you on replacing the PB with plywood, but was thinking about doing a layer of cement board or something for the radiant floor to sit on under the tile.

I just got back from the store with the proper fitting to change the cpcv to regular pipe thread. They all get capped for the time being.

Since the floor is coming up a couple layers and that depth hasn't been exactly determined What is the best thing to do with the toilet flange? Where does it end up? at top of floor tile level? or top of subfloor?
 
  #15  
Old 11-20-15, 01:53 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Cement board doesn't add any strength to the floor - it's just for the tile to bond to. Normally 2 layers of plywood are used to make the floor rigid and then the cement board goes on top of that. I put the top of the commode flange on top of the cement board .... but I'm a painter - the pros may do it different.
 
  #16  
Old 11-20-15, 05:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK. So two layers of 23/32" plywood (because that's what home depot has) then 1/4" self leveling grout for the heat wires. Not doing cement board on the floor. The floor tiles the wife picked out are like 3/8". I didn't think to measure them when the wife picked them out.
How much of a difference do you guys think that the tile height will make when setting the height for the commode flange? Mark said at the top of cement board but not going to be one of them. Any other opinions? Still figuring out how to set it at top of self-leveling grout
 
  #17  
Old 11-21-15, 06:16 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
You can not self level direct to wood, you need to add lath to give the leveling compound something to grab.

I would replace the floor with a single layer of 3/4" Avantech subfloor material and then go over that with a product like Ditra-Heat which is basically designed for exactly what you have here.

Schluter®-DITRA-HEAT ? Electric floor heating system with integrated uncoupling technology

I'm not familiar with mobile home construction. How much metal framing is holding the floor joists up? What is the unsupported span?
 
  #18  
Old 11-21-15, 06:25 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
MH's have 2 steel I-beams that support the 2x6 floor joists. I'm thinking the I-beams are 8' apart, the main issue is the part that cantilevers out toward the exterior wall.
 
  #19  
Old 11-21-15, 09:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 2,446
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I definitely would have went with cement board as using metal lathe between the plywood and the tile is harder especially for the novice tile setter. You might have a slightly higher floor than what you had before but it shouldn't be that much higher. Also I wouldn't worry much about the toilet flange as you can buy flange extensions if you need to. Going back to the cement board you definitely need plywood underneath for strength. I think too that your best bet will be to then use tile and make a shower instead of trying to find a tub as that might be a bit hard to find in the space you have.
 
  #20  
Old 11-21-15, 10:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK
homedepot.com lied. My local store had 5/8". I bought enough for 2 layers. Then today I got roped into helping a buddy and didn't get much of anything done.

Pics of where it is now.





I had really big plans last night. Then realized the particle board is glued like a mofo to the Joists. Each one is scraped/chipped off by hand with a wood chisel.

I anticipate the floor to be higher when done but oh well. I am thinking 5/8" plus 1/4" self leveling cement plus tile which I think will be about 1/2". But no real other way to do it.
I was stressing how I was going to redo the flange. Then I found this.





Now I can just jam this thing down in the pipe at any level and set it where I want. I never knew such a thing existed but found it while looking at the flanges for options.

Mark, I also found out why you said put the flange on top of cement board not tile height. There are several options for seal rings. I haven't ever used anything but wax until looking at the store last night. Some of the rings also have spacers to get more height to seal.
 
  #21  
Old 11-22-15, 12:11 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well I just got done reading some info from the link by czizzi. Ditra Mat looks awesome and I may well be returning what I already bought and ordering some of this. One thing I haven't had much luck finding out about the ditra mat is if it is alright to use the River Rock style of tile mats my wife picked out. They unique shapes of rocks on mesh mats. Not square tiles like normal.


So now that I have spent an hour and a half looking at Ditra Mat back to my subfloor.



From the pics you can tell joists are not where I wish they were for ease of attaching the subfloor. On the left side the joist is about 3" under the edge of my cut. I am thinking put a 2x4 horizontal into it with screws. Of course predrilled. It will only hit the edge of the bottom subfloor but the second layer can go to the wall plate and hit the horizontal 2x4. I can also drill down through the wall plate into it. The left side will see no foot traffic because of the vanity and the toilet. The right side will get a similiar 2x4 but it will be vertical. The right side will get all the foot traffic and weight.

Thoughts? Hopefully a bunch of progress pics later today. Since it is after midnight here.
 
  #22  
Old 11-22-15, 04:28 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,067
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
I am thinking 5/8" plus 1/4" self leveling cement plus tile which I think will be about 1/2"
I'm a painter, not a tile guy but it's always been my understanding that it is best to have 2 layers of plywood under ceramic tile as it makes the floor stiffer. Any movement in the floor will cause the grout to crack. I think they generally shoot for 1.25" thickness with the subfloor.
 
  #23  
Old 11-22-15, 04:45 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
It is my understanding that Ditra can not be used with tiles smaller than a certain size (2"x2"). And your river rocks would therefore not be a wise move if you go with the Ditra Heat.

I've only done one shower floor where the customer wanted river rocks and it was a nightmare to install. Just be forewarned that even though it is on a mesh mat, most of the stones will fall off. The glue and mesh will keep the stones from a good bond with your mortar. You will therefore find many loose stones the day after installation. I spent 3 days wiggling stones until I was satisfied that they all were properly stuck down. It will also give you grief around the perimeter of the room (gaps and unlevel for baseboards) and certainly in the area of a the toilet which requires a flat surface to sit on.
 
  #24  
Old 11-22-15, 06:00 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,438
Received 25 Votes on 21 Posts
I'd flat out refuse to install river rock tile, add impossible to clean properly, feels horrible on bare feet to the list of reasons not to use it.
I make it easy on myself when doing a bathroom floor and go under the floor and cut off the tail pipe so I can pull the whole flange out.
Just use a Fernco to reconnect after the floors done.
To remove that glued down subfloor I make cuts along side of the joist to remove most of it and use a sawsall to trim off what's left on top of the joist.
A Toe Kick saw makes quick work of cutting along the outside walls, using a sawsall with a short, wide, course toothed blade held at a steep angle, or an ossilating saw to cut the inside corners.
 
  #25  
Old 11-22-15, 06:47 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm a painter, not a tile guy but it's always been my understanding that it is best to have 2 layers of plywood under ceramic tile as it makes the floor stiffer. Any movement in the floor will cause the grout to crack. I think they generally shoot for 1.25" thickness with the subfloor.
I am going with 2 layers of 5/8 plywood. It will be as stiff as I can get it. Lots of screws between the sheets.


"I'd flat out refuse to install river rock tile, add impossible to clean properly, feels horrible on bare feet to the list of reasons not to use it.
I make it easy on myself when doing a bathroom floor and go under the floor and cut off the tail pipe so I can pull the whole flange out.
Just use a Fernco to reconnect after the floors done.
To remove that glued down subfloor I make cuts along side of the joist to remove most of it and use a sawsall to trim off what's left on top of the joist.
A Toe Kick saw makes quick work of cutting along the outside walls, using a sawsall with a short, wide, course toothed blade held at a steep angle, or an ossilating saw to cut the inside corners.
As you're the second person to mention the problems with river rock I am going to inform the wife later today that they are not going to happen. If I never post again on here send the police. LOL She really has heart set on them and I am about to break her heart.

I was going to try to use the couplers for the sewer pipe until I found the one that just slides down the inside. One thing that was giving me fits is the flange was directly on a sweep tee, but the new flange eliminates that issue. I was kinda thinking the couplers were a hack job/jerry rig fix, but what do I know?? That's why I'm here for help.

My sawzall skill level doesn't allow me to trim the top of the joists with is. I'm trimming close to them, then using a sawzall scraper to get most of the PB off. Then chisel the wood glue.

Does everybody have a favorite kind of glue to put this all together with??
 

Last edited by czizzi; 11-22-15 at 07:15 AM. Reason: Added quote bubbles
  #26  
Old 11-22-15, 07:17 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
To add quote bubbles, click on the quote icon on the task bar (furthest icon on the right). It will open up a pair of quote words. Copy/Paste your quote between the two words
 
  #27  
Old 11-22-15, 07:27 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
I think you will need to cut your floor closer to the wall and then add blocking that goes from the next joist to the one visible in the room. Toenail 16d nails to make as strong as possible if you have an air nail gun. If not, 3" deck screws toenailed into the blind joists and you can shoot directly through the visible joists. You will have to contort yourself at odd angles but is needed for the stiffest floor possible for tile.

To glue your ply to the joists, use Liquid Nails for Subfloor (all liquid nails are not alike. must say subfloor on it).

Question weather the new flange will work if your pipe immediately turns upon entering the floor. How far above the particle board is the flange now?
 
  #28  
Old 11-23-15, 08:57 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question weather the new flange will work if your pipe immediately turns upon entering the floor. How far above the particle board is the flange now?
It is kinda flush now( my dremel cut off skills are not 100%). It is a long sweep. The end of the sweep is a coupler that was the flange end. I know what you're saying and I think the end will be in the straight part of the coupler. If I had to I could cut the bottom of the flange stem off so it sits straight in the coupler. I got stuff on it right now but will try to get a pic later.
 
  #29  
Old 11-25-15, 06:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well finally an update. Here is where I am at today.





Next piece of floor is cut, just need to trim for heater vent and it will be good. Then have to fill the middle crack and then start on the two long pieces.
 
  #30  
Old 11-27-15, 08:08 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
[ATTACH=CONFIG]59344[/ATTACH]

I copied this picture from here.



Here is my project. Tub finally set.






As you can see the tub is about 1/4" to 3/8" from the side walls. I had to put shims in to not bend the tub or pull the wall studs out closer to the tub. Does the backer board stop at the edge of the tub or does it go down over the flange? From the diagram at the top it looks like it stops at the tub. Then how does the waterproofer work to keep water from running down the concrete board and the ouside of the tub? Just the bead of silicone between the cement board and the tile flange?
 
Attached Images  
  #31  
Old 11-27-15, 08:13 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
And another question:
What kind of material should I use to rebuild the window case? I asked earlier in the thread with no response. Is regular 1x4 sufficient? Just primered and painted? Certain wood that is more moisture friendly considering it is above a shower?
 
  #32  
Old 11-27-15, 08:59 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Shingle down the wall some 15# felt paper overlapping both each sheet and also in each corner. Cut the felt paper about 8" longer than the tub and wrap 4" past each corner. Do the same for the ends of the tub and overlap the backwall as well. Leave the felt paper long so it hangs into the tub. Then put up your cement board setting in on the flange as in the diagram. Trim off the felt paper after the fact so water will sheet into the tub and not the wall.

Look into expanded PVC trim boards for the window. Looks and works the same as lumber yet will never rot out on you. Make sure you have a positive slope toward the tub so water will drain off the sill.
 
  #33  
Old 11-27-15, 11:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Shingle down the wall some 15# felt paper overlapping both each sheet and also in each corner. Cut the felt paper about 8" longer than the tub and wrap 4" past each corner. Do the same for the ends of the tub and overlap the backwall as well. Leave the felt paper long so it hangs into the tub. Then put up your cement board setting in on the flange as in the diagram. Trim off the felt paper after the fact so water will sheet into the tub and not the wall.
So I spent most of the day watching youtube videos about tub surrounds. Mostly by TileMasterGA.
One thing is is the felt paper sticks out the bottom of the cement board would't it get sealed in when you put the bead of silicone around from the tub to the cement board? Then any water behind the board but in front of the felt would have nowhere to go? Am I missing something?
Most of the videos they used Hydrobarrier to waterproof the cement board but of course it is not locally available. So I think I am going with Hardiebacker and sealed with Redgard.

Of course the only PVC trim boards wide enough have a rough wood texture to them.
 
  #34  
Old 11-28-15, 04:04 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
In a properly constructed tub/shower tile job, it doesn't matter about the felt paper. I have never put a bead of caulk between the tub and the cement board. In between the studs, you have nothing but a big crack and air behind it. You are not sealing anything. And if water gets to the back side of the cement board, then it will be directed back into the wall cavity. So the thinking is somewhat backwards. I have only recently started adding redgard to the mix as a feel good for the customers like yourself that spend all day watching videos. Key point here is that when the wall is constructed, the tile is up, in the corners, that you do not grout that inside corner, instead you use a flexible color matching caulk to seal. 80% of water issues are that the inside corners are grouted and the grout cracks. The other 20% are doors not sealed, silly weep holes installed, splash past curtains and not properly prepared pan liners on curbs. I just repaired a beautiful shower that had water damage because water got past the tile on a half wall in the shower. The half wall was capped with regular bullnose tile. Once inside, the water expanded the framing, which further cracked the grout, which opened up letting more water into the framing. It festered because the customer was told that that was how tile walls usually look (with cracked grout). Only reason I was aware of it is that I asked if there was anything else that needed attention after I installed a door for them.

Call around to lumber yards and inquire about expanded PVC boards. The ones I use are textured on one side, smooth on the other. I have also found ones that are smooth on both sides.
 
  #35  
Old 11-28-15, 07:00 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK Caulk the corners, not grout.
I hadn't caught that one yet.
I am also going to put horizontal 2x4s between the studs to hold the bottom of the backer board. Helps keep it stiff so if someone leans on the wall it won't flex and crack the grout. Hopefully some real progress pics tonight.

Only one lumber yard within 180 miles,that is open past 5pm on weekdays. My choice is pretty much Home Depot.
 
  #36  
Old 11-28-15, 07:59 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
OK Caulk the corners, not grout.
I hadn't caught that one yet.
Just to make sure I did not confuse, it is caulk the corners AFTER putting tile up and after you grout the REST of the shower. The cement board gets mesh tape and thinset in the corners and on the seams. The rule is anywhere you have a change in plane such as inside corners, where floor meets walls, where curbs meet walls, where wall meets tub - you use a flexible caulk at that transition. Walls expand and contract. Different walls will expand and contract at different rates. Grout will crack and allow water to enter. Caulk will move with the walls. Next time you go to HD, look in the bathroom. They usually have tile from floor to ceiling. Look in the corner - bet you will see a big long crack in the grout line. Drives me crazy every time I go in my local HD.

I am also going to put horizontal 2x4s between the studs to hold the bottom of the backer board. Helps keep it stiff so if someone leans on the wall it won't flex and crack the grout.
Certainly not a bad idea although not necessary unless you are undersizing your cement board (not a good idea, use 1/2" CBU for walls). Reason being is that once you add your tile, the wall will stiffen up hard as a rock. Usually, 16" oc walls are fine. If you have wider spacing on your studs, then blocking would be in order in multiple locations at different heights in the wall.
 
  #37  
Old 12-01-15, 05:18 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 22
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well it is going a lot slower than I had hoped.

Put up the first hardiebacker and I cracked the corner.




I am going to change it out, but figured I would post pics to see if there were any other comments.
 
  #38  
Old 12-02-15, 02:49 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Change out he screws and washwers for roofing nails that catch the edge. Hardie will crack if there is an obstruction (the washer) of if too close to he edge. Are you using hardie screws? I also assume you are going to install a vapor barrier on top of the hardie like redgard or hydroban.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: