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Waterproofing showerpan with 3 layers of redgard and tape only ?

Waterproofing showerpan with 3 layers of redgard and tape only ?

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  #1  
Old 01-29-16, 02:28 PM
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Waterproofing showerpan with 3 layers of redgard and tape only ?

My old shower was build on a 4 "concrete reinforced slab on plywood subfloor. No liner or other waterproofing in between. I removed the concrete slab because there was an awful slope in it and the new showerpan will be larger. I also removed the subfloor and I am lowering it by sistering the joists and will be adding addinional framing. Even though there was no waterproofing done , the surrounding wood, drywall en subflorr did not show any waterdamage after 20 years. My guess is that this is partly due to the hot dry climate.

I am considering my options for the new showerpan . A pre- fab shower pan like wedi,kerdi,tru-gard would be perfect but because I live on an island I will have to import and that will double the price.
If I am going to build a mud pan it appears I will need a liner which is also not available here.
I definately don't want to build a concrete slab like there was before.
I recently read in a post how someone tested the waterproofing abilities of 3 layers of redgard and other similar products by putting this on a cardboard box. They did not leak and mosquitos moved in ,he claimed.
So now I wonder if I could use 3 layers of redguard ,which is available here, and waterproof my pan that whay....considering the climate...water evaporates in no-time.
But if I were to waterproof this way, would I still need a mudpan or could I put it on a sheet of 1/2" cementbackerboard provided that this sheet was properly sloped.
I know that this option would not be according to code and no contracter would put his name under but if it would work , that would be good enough for me.
If there is a better option...please point me in the right direction
 
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  #2  
Old 01-29-16, 03:44 PM
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Welcome to the forums! First, we don't know where you are located, so we will be slacking in some of our advice as it is not pertinent to your location, obviously. Importing materials or not there is a right and wrong way to do this. The slope your previous pan had was there for a reason.....to direct water to your drain. Placing your shower on a piece of backer is not going to give you the slope you need, and you can't slope cbu properly as it will crack. Using the Schluter system is a good way to build a shower if done according to their directions and using their products exclusively. Red Gard is an excellent sealing material. Using it as you describe won't give the results needed, however.

Look into and study the videos available on the Schluter system of building a shower pan/wall. They are definitely an eye opener. We are here to help if you need it.
 
  #3  
Old 01-30-16, 05:42 AM
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Thanks for the advice chandler, I do know what the slope was for but it was allmost 1'5 inch a foot and uncomfortable. I wanted to achieve the new slope by sloping the sister joists and framing below. That way the cementboard would be supported and not bend.
The house I am upgrading is a very small ,low property value ,cabin like house. I know making that kind of sloped adjustments to the floor is unconventional but taking the above into consideration ,its not very likely that there ever will be another remodel in the house, its just not worth it.
What exactly is the purpose of a mudpan? Its not waterproof is it just to achieve the slope? There are loads of videos on how to make them but I just can't find these anwsers.
If I were to go with the mud pan , how much extra depth does that require ? Just enough to achieve the proper slope or is there a minimal thickness?
 
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Old 01-30-16, 08:22 AM
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Your framing method will fail. CBU is not meant to span any framing member. You first lay in a vapor barrier, then pack in semi dry sand mix concrete to form a pre-slope, defining what you want the slope to be. Then you install pvc liner material across the bed and up on the walls, folding, not cutting it to fit, and tacking it only at the top. Then you pack in another layer, called the slope, which finished the job. Several steps left out, like drain, etc. but you get the picture. The slope can be whatever you want as long as it is about 1/4" per foot or more so water can drain.
 
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Old 01-30-16, 12:19 PM
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This guy hear goes through most steps required in a proper shower pan build, he also adds a bit of humor during the course. Study it and come back if you have additional questions. Please add to his discussion by including blocking between the studs to support the liner, Add cement board to the walls before the second mudbed is installed and look into precast shower curbs to save you some detail work. It is a 5 part instructional series, make sure you read it all.

How to Create a Shower Floor – Part 1
 
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