Kitchen countertop - laminate V quartz

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Old 10-18-16, 11:17 PM
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Kitchen countertop - laminate V quartz

I went into a store recently and the people seemed pretty cool and "honest" but when I told the guy I wanted a simple kitchen, didn't want to spend too much on the countertop and was leaning towards laminate, he said I was better off going with quartz since the cost of making the laminate top would almost equate to a nice quartz one.

There was one other stone that he mentioned, started with an "A" if I'm not mistaken.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
 
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Old 10-19-16, 02:49 AM
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Silestone is probably the most popular. Silestone – the leader in quartz surfaces for kitchens and baths I would get a quote on both comparing apples to apples regarding amenities such as undermount sink versus surface mount sink, etc. before settling. I don't think they were being totally truthful, since laminate countertops are already premade and sitting in stock somewhere.
 
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Old 10-19-16, 07:28 AM
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While quartz is my personal preference, I've never seen it compete in price with laminate.
 
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Old 10-19-16, 07:59 PM
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I haven't installed a laminate counter in 12 years or more, nobody wants them.
I would look at solid surface, Corian or Hi-Macs. The material will scratch and cut if you're not careful, but can be repaired and buffed out to look like new no matter how old.
The seams are invisible which is not the case in stone, although some colors of stone will hide seams better than others.
The quartz or solid surface will cost quite a bit more than laminate, but you will only do it once.
 
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Old 10-19-16, 08:30 PM
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Then there's concrete. More labor intensive but I'm pretty sure cheaper (if you DIY) and can easily be custom fitted to an irregular wall or situation if you pour in place.
 
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Old 11-05-16, 10:19 PM
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Yes, concrete! I had laminate in a house I bought 12 yrs ago, and can't wait to finish this remodel.
Check the concrete DIY vids out there. There is a way you can have all the benefits of the concrete look without the intense work and specially the heavy weight. You work on existing laminate or plywood, add (with spatula) a layer of gray or colored concrete. Let dry, buff, and repeat until you are happy. The result is strong, also water, stain and scratch resistant. You can seal it (do, gloss or matte, but seal!) or leave plain. You can add borders or "inlaid" materials, glass tiles, etc. and sink goes top or under-mounted. Cost, without labor? $30-50. Versatile look, goes with all, specially stainless appliances.
 

Last edited by Yeshecan; 11-05-16 at 10:25 PM. Reason: Clarify
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Old 11-05-16, 10:22 PM
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Also, there is tiles.
Wait! Really, I've seen in this last year, tiles laid on top of formica or just plywood counters: small glass tiles, large stone (marble, slate) tiles, composite using cute skinny border tile and large ones for backsplash and counter surface. It does look great!
 
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Old 11-06-16, 08:11 AM
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Tiles can look good but keep in mind grout lines and lippage can make using the counter as a work surface problematic.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 03:07 PM
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I had a tile kitchen counter in two houses (total of 6 years). Yes, stuff can fall on the grout (use a sponge, grout is basically concrete, it takes anything!). If it stained, add a drop of bleach (I never had to). Also, you can seal the grout, and finish it level, as opposed as it below the hight of tiles, as it was in my kitchens. That turns the surface into virtually one solid, water proof, surface. It is also very DIY, and fairly fast.
In my case I had small tiles (2"x2"?) in both cases. The irregular surface, with the grouts below tile hight, was annoying when sitting small items on top.
So, I'd go for big, smooth tiles (I've seen them on counter displays, beautiful) or slate. Even marble tiles are going to be beautiful, and a lot cheaper than a marble slab. I wish I could attach pics, have them right on my phone...
 
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