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Is it worth ducting a range hood to the outside?

Is it worth ducting a range hood to the outside?

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  #1  
Old 10-31-16, 10:28 AM
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Is it worth ducting a range hood to the outside?

I am in the middle of a major kitchen remodel, and am considering whether or not it will be worth the effort to vent a range hood to the outside.

We are going to have a conventional (gas) 30" range, located on an interior wall that runs perpendicular to an exterior wall. In order to vent to the outside, I would need to run approx 5' of horizontal ductwork above the cabinets and then outside.

Above the range we will have a combination microwave/vent hood.

We have never had an exterior venting range hood before. Just recirculating type.

My question boils down to whether or not this would be worth the effort. Has anyone gone from a recirculating type to the vented type? Is the difference worth it?

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-31-16, 10:33 AM
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I would never have a recirculating type exhaust vent fan.
Direct venting to the outside is the only way to go in a kitchen.
 
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Old 10-31-16, 10:53 AM
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I did switch a microwave vent from recirc to outside. Worked well. Check the manufacturer's specs concerning vent run, elbows, etc. Be careful doing the work....fire depts don't like them.
 
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Old 10-31-16, 01:13 PM
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I would only consider a vent that exhausts outside. Without it the hood is mostly useless. You may also be able to run your exhaust duct vertical and go out through the roof if you don't have a second story. Also, the ducting must be rigid galvanized steel. Aluminum or flexible "dryer" hose is not permitted.
 
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Old 10-31-16, 01:43 PM
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Agreed this is worth the effort, especially since you are remodeling. 5 feet is no problem.

I would need to run approx 5' of horizontal ductwork above the cabinets and then outside.
By above the cabinets, do you mean in the joist cavities or in a soffit above the cabinets?
Are you sacrificing upper cabinet height to run the duct?
 
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Old 11-05-16, 10:08 PM
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Yes, worthy!
I regret during my ongoing remodeling having put, again, mw/recirculating vent combo. This newer, upgraded type has zero efficiency. Whole house smells like whatever was cooked yesterday (all the way to 2nd floor, which is now the vent). Also, indoor humidity increases a lot during cooking.
I've tested the vent with a thin kleenex, and hair. They don't even move in the direction of the vent! Of course, one cannot test this at the store...
 
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Old 11-06-16, 03:59 AM
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Whole house smells like whatever was cooked yesterday
Are you using the charcoal filters? Most MW hoods don't come with the filters, you must purchase separately and change them every 6 months or sooner.
It's not the best but should help in your situation.
 
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Old 11-06-16, 07:12 AM
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The old reasoning behind a hood was to reduce the odors from cooking. Newer thinking has included air quality and the gas products given off from the stove, along with the moisture. It is now recommended that the exhaust fan be run anytime the gas is being used. In today's more energy efficient air tight homes air quality has become a high priority. Vent to the outside for sure as others have stated.

Bud
 
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Old 11-06-16, 03:10 PM
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@Handyone
Yeap, with filter (appreciate your advice, though!)
There is no suction at all, as if the vent were not there. But nevermind this, point is, outside vent is so much better.
 
  #10  
Old 11-21-16, 01:26 PM
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If I do this, I'm thinking I'll just run the ductwork right on top of the cabinets.

The top of the cabinets is right at 8' above floor grade. There is one more foot before you get to the ceiling. That gives me some room. I could run the duct back against the wall, above the cabinets, and it would be all but invisible.
 
  #11  
Old 11-21-16, 02:10 PM
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Sounds like a plan. The duct might not be visible and is well worth the effort to have it there.

Above the range we will have a combination microwave/vent hood.
Be aware that a MW hood vents nowhere near the quality of a regular hood. I have one because of convenience and it's better than recirculating.

No matter the quality, they all vent marginally at best. I would call it good enough.
Normally you would run 7" round above the cabinets, but I would have no problem with reducing that to 6" round.
 
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