Cutting laminate countertop already installed

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  #1  
Old 11-06-16, 08:17 PM
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Question Cutting laminate countertop already installed

Ok, you experts. I had a laminated countertop for 12 years. Time for a change (aged, burnt and scratched at places, but mostly eyesore)
I'm remodeling on a budget, if I had it my way I'd take away counters and put planks, stain them a rich walnut, seal, and enjoy.
But don't have the tools (or skills ��) for that type of intervention.
Instead, I'll sand and do a fake concrete counter. Well, real concrete, but not solid. Just couple of layers.
There are enough vids and blogs on that, it will go well with the steel appliances.
Thing is, I have this integrated counter/backsplash that goes all the way to the cabinets, and a curved angle between counter and backsplash.
For a straight, 90 angle, can I somehow cut the angle off and just pull the backsplash off (or put something on top of it)? Basically, want to eliminate the curve and have a right angle there...
If it can be done, can you guys please tell me exactly what tool and blade, and how to do it?
See picture of the counter, you can see where it meets the other wall, and next to stove. [ATTACH]72884[/ATTACH
]
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-06-16 at 09:03 PM.
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Old 11-06-16, 09:04 PM
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Your picture failed to insert. Did you presize it for web use first? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...rt-images.html
 
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Old 11-07-16, 04:35 AM
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Is the counter/backsplash joint curved? Is the front edge part of the counter with a slight ridge and rounded over? If so, it sounds like a post formed laminate counter top. If so you'd probably be better off removing the whole thing and starting over with a new substrate and do the concrete on top of that.
To answer your question you could use an oscillating multi tool to cut the backsplash in place. If you could slide the counter away from the wall you could use a recip saw, oscillating multi tool.
 
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Old 11-07-16, 05:11 AM
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It's going to be hard to cut the splash off flush with the top.
A multi tool will do it, but be slow cutting. If you buy a multi tool, buy one that fits the original Fein blades, they cut the best.

I would either remove the whole counter or use a mini circular saw to cut the counter as close as possible to the splash. That will leave about a 2" gap at the back that you can fill with a strip of wood.
 
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Old 11-09-16, 05:14 PM
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So sorry pic didn't upload. Here it goes. AA battery for scale.
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So, builder grade basic laminate in situ (no premolded), going all the way to cabinets.
If I don't cut, a very cheap amateur option will be just to ad whatever backsplash on the laminate, do the counter, and probably the curve will be covered by both? But I just was hoping for the same wall in the breakfast area to continue as backsplash. I can't build that over the laminate...
Guys, you may want to know that I am handy but only own 4 basic tools, so when you recommend one, be specific (even brand and model, and size and type of blade), just as if you were training a 6 year old ��.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 04:16 AM
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What's the picture on the left...with the battery? It doesn't look like it's a post-formed counter. Can you show a picture that shows the counter/backsplash joint? Based on what you are showing, i.e. doesn't look post-formed, you may be able to add a new laminate or substrate/laminate right over what you have.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 06:25 AM
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That picture with the battery looks like the backsplash cove, that means the splash is post-formed.
The easiest way to remove the splash would be to unsecure the entire counter first and just break off the splash by lifting up the front edge of the counter.
Another easy way is to just replace the counter with plywood or MDF, it won't cost that much and takes very few tools.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 07:30 AM
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When I saw the battery and the angle of the cove I wasn't sure of the orientation. Plus the other picture has an applied edge strip and not a round over edge which I envision on a posted-formed counter.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 07:43 AM
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This is a strange one for sure. Looks home made but has a post form splash. I've torn out many counters and haven't seen one like it.
I would make it easy and trash it.
It's sad to say but I trash old Corian, granite and everything else, it's not worth trying to save the material for other uses.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 07:49 AM
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What I am seeing was common here years ago. The sheet Formica wholesalers here would heat form a 90 curve on the Formica if requested. The installer then trimmed as needed and glued to the cabinet top and wall. As I recall it could also be formed on site with a heat gun. Always thought it was less then sturdy because the hollow behind the curve was not filled in.
 
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