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How to close the gap between bathtub and wall


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02-13-17, 06:06 AM   #41 (permalink)  
I was hoping someone would concur on this method. off to home depot.

thank you.

 
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02-14-17, 02:48 PM   #42 (permalink)  
modifying duck vent for furred wall

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Size:  44.1 KB so the original duck work had a lip on it that wrapped around the original drywall. i've since straighten it out. since i had to fur out the wall by 5/8" to fill the gap on the tub the original duck work lip won't work with the drywall, as its sitting out 5/8" more. the duck work is very solid in the wall. it looks like the vent that covers the duck was screwed into the original lip on each side. rather than trying to add metal to create another lip,can i just install the drywall around the and attach the vent on top screwing it into the two wings of the duckwork. i'm sure my terminology is wrong but , i'm hoping you get my point. thanks

 
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02-15-17, 04:20 AM   #43 (permalink)  
What does the vent cover look like? Doesn't have to be a solid seal as long as you can dress it out to look decent after the drywall is added. Or do a return on the wall (slight jog) before it gets to the return area so you don't have to worry about adjustments.

 
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02-15-17, 05:45 AM   #44 (permalink)  
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I'm going to try and find a replacement, but if i can't i'll clean it up and paint it. I'm thinking i can put a new one on and just screw it through the wing pieces that are attached to the vertical 2x4's

 
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02-15-17, 05:51 AM   #45 (permalink)  
I doubt you'll find an exact match but you should be able to find one that will fit.
Maybe one of these - https://www.lowes.com/pd/Accord-Vent...-71-in/1095377


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02-15-17, 05:55 AM   #46 (permalink)  
thanks Mark
i remember replacing the one downstairs which is on the same duck work.

 
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02-17-17, 09:26 AM   #47 (permalink)  
in order to get one of my walls plum, is it ok to have the bottom part of the CB overlapping the lip of tub more than usual?

 
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02-17-17, 11:43 AM   #48 (permalink)  
How much more? The cement board needs to be secure so there is no danger of the tile/grout cracking?


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02-17-17, 01:25 PM   #49 (permalink)  
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I need to put a small furring strip in below the furring strip that's just above the tub. you can see in the second picture that the top is flush. My issue was the distance from the top left wall at the top was 1/2 inch narrower than the distance at the bottom. i would have had issues with the tile not matching perfectly. there will be support behind the CB along the bottom, so stability shouldn't be a issue. i'm not please that i have to do it this way, but i don't see any options. it the end i don't think its going to make any difference in the being able to put a bottle of shampoo in the corner.

 
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02-21-17, 06:19 AM   #50 (permalink)  
whats the best way to cover the transition from CB to DW? mesh tape?
thinset or joint compound

 
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02-21-17, 06:35 AM   #51 (permalink)  
It's best to have the tile cover the gap. If the gap must be exposed use mesh tape and a setting compound like Durabond or EastSand.


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02-21-17, 06:56 AM   #52 (permalink)  
Make sure your transition falls under your bull nose tile transition. Use mesh tape and a setting type joint compound. Sand it smooth before you tile.

 
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02-21-17, 07:09 AM   #53 (permalink)  
yes my joints are under my bullnose tile.

can i use the all purpose JC like im using on the rest of the DW?

thanks

 
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02-21-17, 09:17 AM   #54 (permalink)  
Setting type compounds are not effected by moisture and won't re-wet when you go to place the tile. You an pick up a small box of it at the the box stores, you don't have to purchase a big bag of it.

 
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02-24-17, 06:14 AM   #55 (permalink)  
tile layout

A couple of questions regarding layout of tile:

1. my tub is within an 1/8 in level on the long side.
i see that its common to place a level line around tub as a start point to lay there tile. for 3x6 tile how far up should i draw the line from tub? i'm guessing you would measure up from the low end of the tub? if you have an 1/8" between tub and bottom of tile and 1/8" of grout above the lowest tile, would the line go at the 3 1/4 " ?

2. is it best to put the bullnose tile at the vertical of tub first and tile in to the corner from there?

3. since my ceiling is low (80") is it best to run tile to top (butt against ceiling) or have the bullnose as top tile working around entire perimeter?

 
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02-24-17, 06:51 AM   #56 (permalink)  
Nail a ledger board all the way around the tub starting at a measurement that requires you to cut each tile along the first row. In other words, start at row two and when complete, remove the ledger and cut each individual tile on row one to fit.

Center tile on each row and work toward the ends so that everything is balanced. Bullnose is last to go up. Use a 4 foot level to ensure a vertical line up the sides. Your call and preference if you go to the ceiling or not with the tile.

 
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02-26-17, 12:57 PM   #57 (permalink)  
does this look like i'll be ok with tiles aligning on install

I still have to put the red guard on, but are there any measurements i could be missing? i'm a little nervous about everything being nice and symmetrical. All walls are plumb. There are a few spots that i can see a little daylight (less than 1/8") under the 4ft level, but i don't think its significant to be able to see when the tiles are up. Feeling fairly confident that things will be ok, but need some conformation. thanks
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02-26-17, 01:30 PM   #58 (permalink)  
Do what I call a story board. Lay your tiles out flat on the ground first end to end and then one over the top of the other with your spacers in between the tile. Then lay a tape across the whole lot and wright down every measurement to the next tile. Then cross check and reference those numbers to see where grout lines will hit for your install. Pay attention to the underside of the window and the top of the window measurements. Don't want any "sliver" cuts and you want it to look balanced.

You will want to carry carry your tile slightly past the edge of the tub (inch or slightly more) and carry it all the way down to the floor. Your radius cut and the front edge of the tub will taper a bit as it goes to the floor. Finish with your bullnose for a clean look.

 
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02-27-17, 09:44 AM   #59 (permalink)  
Any suggestions on other options to finish tub edge without bullnose. with the 6" bullnose you can't get the grout lines to match. since i'm trying to do this the cheap route, the big box stores only have the 2x6 BN.

Also, I'd like to install a few 9" marble corner shelves. They have some weight to them and they are 3/4 thick. Based on youtube videos, it looks like i can mortar the back edges and place the shelve above the two corner tiles notching the front. It looks like i should leave 1/8 above the shelve for next tile row and gap for grout. if this is doable, are you cutting the tile to fit opening for shelf and finishing wall and then installing shelves? or are you installing them as you go? It seems like you would have to let the tiles below set first to hold the weight of the shelf for install?


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Last edited by owenpga; 02-27-17 at 10:01 AM.
 
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02-27-17, 09:53 AM   #60 (permalink)  
Most bullnose are 2x6 and you really don't want the grout lines on the bullnose to match. Offset them on the back wall and top cap and stagger as you have on the sides. Once grouted, you won't notice it much. Cut the corners at 45 degrees to turn and change direction from horizontal to vertical.

 
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03-11-17, 01:22 PM   #61 (permalink)  
finish top row on bathroom tiling

Look for suggestions on how to handle a difference in ceiling height from left side of center wall H-63 1/2" to the last tile on the right 63 1/4" the widow wall has the same 63 1/2" across entire wall. starting at the corner on the right wall, it goes from 63 1/2 to 63 1/4". How would you handle this situation with the tiling?

The shower head extension arm is level with the top of the second to last tile on the left, so there is not much room above the extension arm. as you can see, the last tile doesn't go to the ceiling. i could put a 1.25" tile in and add the bullnose on top, but not sure i could get away with having the small gap of 1/2" at top.
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03-11-17, 01:59 PM   #62 (permalink)  
You can float the highest parts of the ceiling down with joint compound. I would use an 8" knife to lay on a heavy coat of setting compound (hot mud) along the edges of the ceiling that need to come down. Then follow that up with regular joint compound and a 10" or 12" knife. No one will be the wiser. Then use your grout matching caulk along the ceiling and corners

 
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03-11-17, 02:35 PM   #63 (permalink)  
I would probably just add a small crown molding to the top of the tub area and possibly carry it around the whole room. Bed molding comes to mind.

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03-12-17, 06:57 AM   #64 (permalink)  
thanks for the great suggestions. looking forward to finishing this project.

 
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03-12-17, 01:01 PM   #65 (permalink)  
finish bottom row of tile

the durarock sits just above the vertical lip that surrounds the tub leaving about a 1" gap between the durarock and top of tub. when you place to bottom row of tiles there is a void behind the lower part of the tile. I'm trying to get my head around how this is going to affect putting the grout into the tile? I'm concerned that the grout will go through the gap since there is no wall behind that part of the tile. Am i missing a step here?

 
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03-12-17, 01:43 PM   #66 (permalink)  
No, the gap will prevent wicking of water. Grout should be no problem as there is only about 1/4" of space between it and the tub surface, so it should be fine.

 
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03-15-17, 08:37 AM   #67 (permalink)  
two questions:

1. on the vertical corners in the shower are you suppose to grout that gap or is it best to use a grout matching silicone?

2. any suggestions on how to transition from the tile to molding at floor level?

a. are you running the tile to the floor and butting molding to the tile or
b. are you running molding to tub and tiling to top of molding

option A. doesn't seem like a good fit as the molding would be thicker than the 1/4" tile.

look forward to your feedback
thanks

 
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03-15-17, 09:09 AM   #68 (permalink)  
Color matching caulk in the vertical corners.

Run tile and bullnose to the floor. Bring your molding to the tile and do a finished end cut as if you are turning an outside corner. 45 degree back cut matched to a very short 45 degree cut in the other direction. Glue the pieces together.

 
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03-15-17, 09:20 AM   #69 (permalink)  
is this what you are referring to

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03-15-17, 09:41 AM   #70 (permalink)  
Yes that is a finished end cut on base molding.

 
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03-19-17, 07:49 AM   #71 (permalink)  
flooring options other than tile

I've read many reviews against hardwood, cork, bamboo for bathrooms. I've also read about customers having no issues with these floors. I grew up in an older house that had hardwood floors and there were never any issues. the floors are actually still in great shape after 40yrs. We don't have kids so, having a wet mess at the end of a shower is not likely. We also have a full bath downstairs with tile incase we should ever sell the house to a family.

i would really like to avoid tile as its so cold on the feet in the winter.

If i decide to go with a finished hardwood floor, can you still seal the floor even though it already has a sealer on it?

Any opinions would be great. thanks

 
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03-19-17, 11:01 AM   #72 (permalink)  
can you still seal the floor even though it already has a sealer on it?
Not sure I understand that question You can always apply poly over existing poly if you sand lightly first.


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03-20-17, 03:21 PM   #73 (permalink)  
thanks for your reply Mark. even though the floor is pre-finished, I thought it might make a better seal if i coated the entire floor once it was down, therefore sealing the small crease in between each piece of wood.

 
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03-20-17, 03:26 PM   #74 (permalink)  
I did that with the parquet in my kitchen and dining rm. Instead of sanding I wiped the finished parquet down with liquid deglosser and then applied a coat of poly. If you don't soften the finish with deglosser or lightly sand there is a good chance your poly won't stay adhered long term.

That said, the factory finish on most prefinished hardwoods is tougher than what you can apply.
Wax would probably seal the joints.


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