Bathroom remodel - complete thread

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-17-17, 09:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Bathroom remodel - complete thread

Hello.

i am going to redo a entire bathroom myself, and this is the first time i will be doing it.

i have started doing the demo, but removing the cabinet / toilet / tub , and starting on removing the wall/floor tiles with scrapers and pryers.

I would like to ask a few things,

1) Is it standard to use 0.5 inches thick cement backer board, and also for dry wall? (i saw an option with 0.375 inch)

2) for cement backer boards - i plan on buying the Durock brand as it comes with 0.5 rather than Hardie's 0.42 inches thick. THe nails selection has a 1.25 inch versus a 1.625 inches Rock-on nails - i bought the 1.25 inches to be used with 0.5inches backer board - is that right?

3) WHen redo-ing the entire flooring - my gut feeling is i should also replace teh old toilet flange but that thing looks very 'strongly' tied onto the floor, so i am not sure if i should consider leaving it alone. In general, do people just replace the toilet flange when they re-tile the bathroom floors?

thanks!

Moderator note:Combined three threads into one. The timeline may be a little hard to follow.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 04-29-17 at 04:29 PM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-17-17, 11:38 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 3,702
Likes Received: 24
The thickness of the backing material goes along with the thickness of your current flooring, what do you have?

If toilet ring is functional I see no reason to replace.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-17, 02:40 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Use 1/4" for flooring and 1/2" for walls. The main thing to do is make sure your subflooring is stout enough to handle tile. Knowing the size of the joisting and the unsupported span will help, as well as the thickness of the subflooring. Remember, CBU offers no structural properties. It just forms a continuous smooth surface for your tile. I use Hardie for flooring, mainly because it has a good fastener legend embossed on it. I use Durock on the walls, for no particular reason except its roughness over Hardie. I also use screws (1 1/4 for thinner and 1 5/8 for thicker) Rock-on aren't nails, or at least not available where I shop.
 
  #4  
Old 04-19-17, 07:15 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Thanks for the reply.

I have a cast iron baseboard heater in the bathroom, i do not plan on taking it out during tiling, do you foresee any issues with this?

the bathroom has a drop ceiling with tiles - what is the best way to get the tiles on the drop ceiling off without hitting myself ? for the wall tiles, i am using a box cutter and getting it off by pieces, but i feel it is significantly harder to cut it on the ceiling... any hits?

i have started taking the wall tiles off, and i didnt get to the floor yet so i am unsure what type of subfloor it is on.

I bought a 7" Skil wet saw cutter (This one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Skil-7-in-W...le-Saw/3185107) and i am using 12x24 porcelain tiles, do you think it would be sufficient? I understand i need to take off the fence and may need to hold it straight to get a clean cut.... if you think that is is definitely not do-able, then may be i need to get a bigger one.

and as for the blade - any recommendation on what blade i should buy for porcelain tiles, and also mosaic glass tiles for border?

Thanks!

thanks
 
  #5  
Old 04-20-17, 03:27 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Fill out your profile so we know where you are located, please.

We can't tell you without seeing the heater, so post pictures. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

Lift the ceiling tiles out at an angle and remove them. They aren't that heavy and most likely won't cause a concussion. Are you re-using ceiling tiles (not recommended) or replacing it with a sheetrock ceiling?

You are planning on gutting the entire bathroom back to studs hopefully. That will allow you to make internal repairs and modifications and start with a clean slate.

The tile saw you show is an elementary one, and will work just fine. Do not remove the shield or you will have a streak of red water from your waist to your head as the blade turns toward you and that shield diverts the water back down. You won't be able to use the fence with that large a tile, so you will need to carefully move it through the blade using precise marks on it.

As far as blades, don't go cheap. You can look at the package and tell what it is made to cut. Cut slowly and let the blade do the work.
 
  #6  
Old 04-20-17, 04:10 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 3,702
Likes Received: 24
12x24 porcelain tiles
The tile saw you show is an elementary one, and will work just fine
I'm going to disagree here, the saw you are looking at is ok for smaller tiles (had one for many years) but a 12x12 tile is pushing it's capability to the max.

I did my entire bathroom with 12 x 12 tiles in the shower and a Versailles (various sixes up to 18x18) slate on the floor and upgraded to a MK similar to this.

Name:  Capture.JPG
Views: 188
Size:  24.7 KB

It was night and day in performance.

Check CL, or eBay, somebody always has a good saw they used for a job and are flipping, which you can then do also!
 
  #7  
Old 04-20-17, 04:26 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Of course sled saws are better. I use a Ridgid with articulating head, but at $500, I think the OP may want to do this on more of a budget. Finding a saw used is fine as long as you know what you are buying. It is being sold for a reason, and it is usually not because it is ugly

You can cut most any tile on the elementary saw as long as you can follow the lines.
 
  #8  
Old 04-20-17, 09:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Hi. Thanks. I will update location and post pic of the heater.

I am located in NYC.

Yes I am going to gut the bath down to studs and will not be reusing tiles. I plan on buying durock this Saturday after I finish getting rid of all the drop ceiling tiles and bathtub.

My bathroom size is 8x5. A standard tub is 60x30" inches so with a standard height of 8 feet to ceiling , my calculation shows I need to buy about 4 pieces of backer board that is 36"x60" and about 4 sheets of 8' x 4' Sheetrock (Lowe's litelift rather than green board due to weight). Is this calculation correct?

I only have a suv and plan on renting a pickup truck from lowes so I can get the bathtub and Sheetrock in one shot - so I need to buy enough Sheetrock due to its sizes.

And correct, I don't want to invest too much on the saw because I will be using this likely only once.

Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 04-21-17, 02:04 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 3,702
Likes Received: 24
Check CL, or eBay, somebody always has a good saw they used for a job and are flipping, which you can then do also!
Checked my area, and several candidates were found, all less than $300.

No way you will ever wrestle a 12 x 24 tile on that little table!

Just trying to provide the correct advice to make the job come out right!!
 
  #10  
Old 04-21-17, 03:16 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Just one note, Marq1, with a free blade saw such as the one the OP is using, there are no restrictions on width. With a bridge saw or sled saw, you are limited to 12" on one side, so in some instances I carry my small saw just in case.
 
  #11  
Old 04-21-17, 05:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Hi

Can you hel em confirm the backerboard and Sheetrock quantity isn't correct based on my 8'x6' bathroom?
 
  #12  
Old 04-21-17, 05:33 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
How tall are you going with the tile above the tub? One sheet laterally on the back wall, one sheet vertically on the leading and trailing walls will give you 60", but that may be too tall. A total of 4 sheets around the tub will suffice. That will leave the wall above the tub on all three walls, plus the remaining walls at 4 sheets plus over shower.
 
  #13  
Old 04-21-17, 06:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
I am going to Tile all the way everywhere.
 
  #14  
Old 04-22-17, 04:53 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
OK, your wet area will get CBU. They come in 3x5 sheets. I don't like tiling over sheetrock, but it is your call on the remainder of the room whether or not you use CBU.
 
  #15  
Old 04-22-17, 07:04 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Thanks.

i have enclosed a picture of the drop ceiling and the cast iron baseboard heater.

I am unsure how to take off the baseboard heater and if i can just leave it and while 'around' it? (Both wall and floor)

thanks

Name:  File_000.jpg
Views: 162
Size:  40.2 KB

Name:  File_001.jpg
Views: 240
Size:  32.4 KB
 
  #16  
Old 04-22-17, 07:57 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
OK, it is a soffit, not a drop in ceiling. It most likely houses ductwork. Confirm that first, as you may be able to eliminate it. Yes, cut the wall and floor from around the heater.
 
  #17  
Old 04-23-17, 01:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
hello.

i have finished gutting the entire bathroom to the studs. (Except the flooring - and that will be tomorrow)

i opened up the soffit (or drop ceiling - as i don't really understand the purpose after opening it up) and i run into the following issues, which i would like to ask for your advice. (See picture.

Inside the soffit or drop ceiling, it has nothing but the vent duct from the bathroom - but it has enough room to sit on normal height ceiling, so i do not know what is the purpose of it. (May be old school style since this was done before i purchase the house, and it is 30 years old original style.)

1)
As i opened up the drop ceiling, i saw some metal romex wire that came from somewhere thru the drop ceiling onto the other side of the room. Now it has these metal clips nailing it onto the studs so they are kind of tight. However, for me to remove this drop ceiling, i need the romex wire length to be pushed up a little bit more as it stands now, it will be blocking the ceiling sheetrock on top of the shower. I tried pulling it a little bit but it seems like it is also nailed down from somewhere i cannot reach. Can i cut open the romex, and add some romex of my own, and make it a junction box, so they become 'longer'? I do have a lot of Southwire Romex 250-ft 12-2 Non-Metallic Wire (Yellow color) so i was wondering if it is okay to mix yellow nonmetal romex with metal romex? (If i can open it and add it thru a junction box)

See picture here:

Name:  File_001 (1).jpg
Views: 225
Size:  29.1 KB

2) For the bathtub - i have already used the special tool to remove the tub drain, but i am unable to lift or move it. There are no nails to the studs, and i have examined it and do not see anywhere it has nails. The drain around the tub, feels like metal to me (I reached down from the water pipe side) , rather than PVC - are there any other screws before i can take it out?

This is the foot lock i plan on buying - i think they should work:
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Plumb-Pak-1...C-Pipe/3132209

See pictures here:

Name:  File_003.jpg
Views: 197
Size:  29.0 KB

3) I found out that the floor tiles are on top of concrete as i took one floor tile out and was able to see. What are some easy way to get rid of floor tiles, without chipping or breaking the concrete flooring? And, the hallway outside the bathroom is a hardwood floor, and i am assuming it is concrete + subfloor + wood floor. Because the bathroom has no subfloor, so it is about half an inch lower than the outside hardwood floor. I do have plans to replace the hardwood floor outside the hallway also --- what can i do now, to elevate the bathroom floor now, so it would be "even" with the hardwood floor outside? (I believe hardwood floor has to sit on top of a subfloor (0.5 inch?) so thats why it looks like a step from hallway -> door jam -> bathroom floor.

See picture here:

Name:  File_002.jpg
Views: 192
Size:  47.0 KB

4)

lastly - what is the best way to take these wood down? (They are from the soffit/drop ceiling - and is cutting it with a saw the only easy way) I tried to move the nails (yes, nails, not screws) but it is extremely hard.

See picture here:

Name:  File_000 (5).jpg
Views: 208
Size:  21.9 KB

Thank you very much.
 
  #18  
Old 04-23-17, 04:22 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Challenge 1. You can re route that armored cable to where it is not a problem with the soffit and cut the lumber either in half and pull it down, or cut across then nails where they intersect the ledger. The ledger needs to come down, too. A good pry bar or crow bar will help. Oh, BTW, nice demo job.
 
  #19  
Old 04-23-17, 07:01 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Hi

For challenge 1, it is okay to cut the metal Rolex in half and connect them with yellow Rolex in 2 junction boxes , correct? Metal wire ----> junction box ----> yellow Romex ----> junction box2 ----> metal wire again.
 
  #20  
Old 04-23-17, 10:31 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Absolutely not. Your local codes most likely will require the use of armored cable. I'm not there, but could you obtain enough slack by running the cable along the wall and then up as it needs to be? The other alternative would be to replace the entire run of AC.

Name:  ac.jpg
Views: 163
Size:  28.3 KB
 
  #21  
Old 04-23-17, 11:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Hi

If I do what you show in pic, it would work, however one of the cable comes from somewhere and onto somewhere else. I have to cut it in middle in order to reroute. If I don't mix yellow Remex but metal wire, it would be consider okay?
 
  #22  
Old 04-23-17, 12:27 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Why do you have to cut it? Notch the 2x4 lumber and apply no-nail plates over it. Simpson Strong-Tie 16-Gauge 1-1/2 in. x 3 in. Nail Stop-NS1 - The Home Depot
 
  #23  
Old 04-23-17, 01:28 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
So... if I don't have access to the beginning or end of a wire , how do I make it go thru the 2x4? Do you mean just saw it open from the sideway, so I can put the armor wire into the 2x4?
 
  #24  
Old 04-23-17, 04:27 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Yep...............................................
 
  #25  
Old 04-28-17, 11:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Repairing concrete flooring in bathroom

Hello.

I am remodeling bathroom, and need some help on the drain pipe with the bathtub.

I bought this foot lock: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Plumb-Pak-1...C-Pipe/3132209

and after i took apart the bathtub today - i saw that i had old metal pipe underneath and its already broken into pieces. (See picture below)

I have the following questions:

1) While i was hammering the tub - the concrete bedding near the toilet area cracked -- it is not moving, but cracked. can i just fill the cracks?

2) The tub drain area - is just a hole thats flushed with the concrete - i am unsure how to move on at this point.

3) looking at the "Rectangular shape of the concrete bed - it looks like the area is too big, and i am worry the new bath tub (Acrylic) may not sit well with one of the corner leg. Any suggestion what needs to be done?

Your help is appreciated.

Name:  File_003 (1).jpg
Views: 180
Size:  53.5 KB

Name:  File_001 (2).jpg
Views: 206
Size:  60.3 KB

Name:  File_004.jpg
Views: 182
Size:  51.4 KB

Name:  File_002.jpg
Views: 203
Size:  56.9 KB
 
Attached Images    

Last edited by takkie; 04-28-17 at 02:25 PM.
  #26  
Old 04-28-17, 06:30 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,138
If it were me, I would not trust that broken concrete to stay put over time; I would remove it back to solid concrete and replace the broken section.

You will have to excavate around the drain pipe to determine what type of fitting you will need to connect your PVC to the existing drain. I'm guessing the existing drain is cast iron or galvanized. You can get a shielded coupling to make the transition between materials.

While I was repairing the broken section of slab, I would extend the pour to include whatever support is needed for the tub.
 
  #27  
Old 04-28-17, 07:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Repairing concrete flooring in bathroom

hello

I am remodeling my bathroom, and i have taken out the tub and most of the tiles. THe house was built in 1964 and these are originals.

Here is the setup that i see in the bathroom.

It looks like it is a 4" concrete slab all around. (based on the tub area pictures), and somehow on the flooring area there is a 1/2 inch concrete pour on top of it. (My guess it was to elevate it) There are alot of cracks near the toilet area on the 1/2 inch concrete, and the worse of all, the tub drain pipe was completely rotten and broken into pieces when i removed the tub. All i see now is a hole down in some "rocky look alike concrete" (Is this called mud bed?)

In the plumbing forum - people suggested that i have to evacuate the drain tub area to hook up my tub and i should replace the broken concrete near toilet.

So i am posting this question in concrete forum hoping someone can give me advice how to fix this.

This is what i am thinking, please let me know if this works or not.

1) get rid of the entire 1/2" concrete slab (there is a high risk that part of the 4" slab may be broken also near toilet onto the tub area)
2) use leveler to fill a flat slab to 1" thick.
3) put some wood to block out a rectangualr section so i can have my drain pipe setup
4) let the acrylic tub sit on top of this new 1" thick concrete slab

Would this work?

And how should i chisel out the tub drain pipe area and not brake the piping so i can hook up some shielded coupling for my pvc piping to Tub?

Thanks

Name:  br1.jpg
Views: 216
Size:  46.0 KB

Name:  br2.jpg
Views: 192
Size:  42.6 KB

Name:  br3.jpg
Views: 181
Size:  49.6 KB

Name:  br4.jpg
Views: 187
Size:  40.2 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 04-28-17 at 09:35 PM. Reason: removed duplicate pics
  #28  
Old 04-28-17, 09:36 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,627
Likes Received: 112
I moved your thread to the bathroom renovation forum from the outdoor concrete forum.

The pros will see your thread here.
 
  #29  
Old 04-29-17, 06:08 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,365
Likes Received: 6
The thinner top coat is the mudbed for tile installation. It is separate from the 4" slab to create a slip layer so that movement in the slab is isolated from the tile to prevent cracking of the tile and grout. If you are going to be excavating and not damage the pipe, a demo hammer can be rented to allow you to chip out smaller bits of concrete until you get down to the soil or sand level.
 
  #30  
Old 04-29-17, 07:10 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
got you.

Honestly, this is the first time i am remodeling a bathroom as DIY - I don't know if this is going to be too much of a project for me to handle with excavating the tub drain, (AND if i break it due to whatever reason, i think it requires digging everything to re-hookup back to the toilet sewer?)

If i use a hammer and a chisel and do it bit by bit - will that take hours/days?

at first i was hoping, remove tub, put some CBU/Sheet rocks, then put some new tiles on and all done.....
 
  #31  
Old 04-29-17, 07:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
I am unsure which forum my post should be in. It first started with tiling and then it became concrete related.

For the tub drain pipe, if I put a pvc insert into the drain hole and secure it onto the rock/cement area then I start hooking it up with the pvc back to the tub, woud this work?
 
  #32  
Old 04-29-17, 04:35 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,627
Likes Received: 112
Review the thread and add any new questions here. Your bathroom remodel is all in one thread. There are some duplicates that were not removed.
 
  #33  
Old 04-29-17, 08:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
Thanks!

Can someone give me some light how i should proceed? SO far i see the following options:

For the Tub Drain area:

Option 1) chisel / hammer out the tub drain area so i have 1-2 inches of clearance to install a coupling. My biggest worry here is the pipe surrounded by concrete will be broken immediately after i get openings due to rotten.... I really do not want to dig few feet deep and get a new pipe to connect to waste line... i don't have the tools avail and afraid it may be too big of a job for myself as a non-prof.

option 2) Dont chisel/hammer, and just try to use a PVC insert so it 'telescopes' into it and hook up the drain there. (Or may be use a copper insert with glue, and connect into some coupling then PVC?)

For the Floor tiling area:

Option 1) Remove cracked pieces near toilet area, and pour quikrete concrete to fill them up to 1 inch mudbed.

OPtion 2) Remove entire 1" mudbed and re-pour entire 1" mudbed as one piece all together.

After that, get some leveler and pour a half inch thick so the floor is flat.

Any other suggestion/options that you see here please?
 
  #34  
Old 04-29-17, 09:10 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,627
Likes Received: 112
It would very risky to try and splice the drain line and assuming that what's in the cement isn't also rotted and leaking.

I'm not a pro in this area but I can see you having to break up some of the concrete to locate a solid connection point.

I can't offer you much help on the floor but the other pros will be back soon.
 
  #35  
Old 04-29-17, 10:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
If you think i should start on the "dig" on the concrete area - and make a solid connection joint -- usually, how many feet down is it, and is renting a jack hammer required in this case? (i dont have experience on this) if i have to dig the concrete - i would be debating if i should call a pro instead of trying this myself. i have a dewalt corded rotary hammer drill, but i dont have a masonry chisel bit - not sure if my rotary hammer drill is enough power - before i go and buy a SDS chisel bit...

is there anyway to test to see if its rotted or leaking thru the hole? (pour some water and listen..etc..?)
 
  #36  
Old 04-30-17, 04:08 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Likes Received: 1
Where will your trap be? Is there one embedded in the concrete? Normal installation will leave a 12" x 12" hole in the concrete into which the trap is installed. You should try to replicate this in order to find out if there is a trap, and secondly install a proper trap.

Is the entire house sitting on a slab, or is this an overlay on a subfloor. I think the former, as that would be an enormous weight for wood to carry. Once you get a good clean cut of concrete and frame in your 12x12 trap box, you may can make a new pour. I am not a concrete pro, so others would have to chime in on this.
 
  #37  
Old 04-30-17, 07:13 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
I do not know if the entire house is sitting on the slab.

last night i try to run a snake down into the drain hole and it got stopped at about 9 inches deep and it makes a 90 degree turn towards the drainage pipe, i was only able to go further may be 1-2 inches after the 90 degree turn, and could not push thru anymore - so i am guessing that is the p trap but i cannot see. I filled 2 gallons of water down into the hole last night, and the water level came up (not overflow) a bit higher so atleast i know the water is going down to drainage, although it seems a bit slow.

it sounds to me digging is unavoidable. So now i would like for ask for advice if this is DIY-able or if i should just hire someone to do this part of job.

Any suggesting on the floor tiling area if i can replace partial cracked concrete or if need to ensure its 1 big piece and replace all of the 1" slab?

thanks
 
  #38  
Old 04-30-17, 02:21 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 50,627
Likes Received: 112
it sounds to me digging is unavoidable. So now i would like for ask for advice if this is DIY-able or if i should just hire someone to do this part of job.
That depends on what you are comfortable with.

Me.... I would go and rent a powered jackhammer from depot and chip away.
 
  #39  
Old 04-30-17, 05:18 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
I am also tempted to do that. Can you give me more info on this?

So I am guessing I should dig the concrete and try to look for where this pipe is connected to, and splice a connection out so I can make a 12x12 proper tub drain with p trap. Should I be filling in quikcrete concrete back to the 4" slab level. And then replace the 1" concrete again after it is dry? ( or partially)

If I am to hire someone, should this person be a plumber or a diff category? I am looking at Angie's list and see if I can get a quote how much it would cost.

Thanks
 
  #40  
Old 05-01-17, 06:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Usa
Posts: 137
YAY!

I started hammering the surrounding and i found the PIPE!

The pipe was actualy there, but it was covered with rocks and dirt... (just hammering losen it up....)

i have filled water into the pipe, and i can see the water level stay in the pipe, which makes me thing there is a p trap down there.

After some researching - it looks like this is a shower floor drain with a built in Trap. (Cast iron?) If that is the case, no wonder the drain area is soooooo off. Can you help me confirm?
And if so, whats the next step on hooking it up to a tub drain...

I am very relief that i see this pipe just hammering the rocks surrounding it..

Name:  File_000 (1).jpg
Views: 233
Size:  59.3 KB

Name:  File_002 (1).jpg
Views: 161
Size:  61.3 KB

Name:  File_001 (1).jpg
Views: 169
Size:  66.8 KB

Name:  File_000 (1).jpg
Views: 158
Size:  48.7 KB
 
Attached Images  

Last edited by takkie; 05-01-17 at 07:11 PM.
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes