Tile falling off, want to put up green board.


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Old 05-26-17, 01:31 PM
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Tile falling off, want to put up green board.

I have a bathroom where the tile is falling off. The tile is probably 70 years old and the adhesion is failing. Behind it it looks like it is some sort of thin concrete that the tile was attached to with metal lattice behind it. It may be plaster, but it has the texture of concrete to it. Could it be plaster that has been roughed to allow the tile adhesion stick to it?

Removing the concrete and lattice will not be possible. I'm wondering if I would be able to put greenboard over instead of taking it all out down to the studs?
 
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Old 05-26-17, 01:43 PM
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A mud wall [under tile] was SOP back when your house was built. What do you intend to do with the greenboard? tile or paint?
 
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Old 05-26-17, 01:49 PM
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I'd want to paint the wall. The stuff I'm talking about is white and it looks like it was put on the width of the tile. It looks like it's individual bricks of the "concrete." Could that be the actual tile adhesive that I am looking at? There's absolutely nothing on the tile.

I should say that I misused lattice. I meant to say metal lath.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 02:14 PM
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Name:  tile.jpg
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This is what is behind the tiles. The photo is turned sideways for some reason.
 

Last edited by chandler; 05-26-17 at 02:36 PM.
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Old 05-26-17, 02:31 PM
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That appears to be remnants of the thin set [tile adhesive] I wonder if skim coating over what you have would be better than hanging drywall directly over it ?? How did you plan to attach the greenboard? add furring strips?
 
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Old 05-26-17, 02:36 PM
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Not sure the correction was right or upside down, but at least isn't sideways
 
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Old 05-26-17, 03:19 PM
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I'm not sure if it's thinset. It's about an 3/4 of an inch thick. I was planning on using 1/4 green board and long drywall screws to hit the metal lath behind whatever that stuff is. There's no room for furring as the toilet clearance doesn't allow it.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 04:25 PM
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Can you back up with your picture and take a wider angle shot of the area? Drywall will be a challenge in a set up like this. May need to use adhesive and concrete nails to get it to work.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 04:55 PM
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Is there drywall adhesive? I was searching for something, but nothing turned up.
 
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Old 05-27-17, 04:33 AM
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There are several different brands but here is one example - https://www.lowes.com/pd/LIQUID-NAIL...ive/1000107381

If it was me, I'd skim coat the wall with a setting compound like Durabond or EasySand.
 
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Old 05-27-17, 05:12 AM
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Yes, the box stores will carry drywall adhesive. It can usually be found on the top shelf in the adhesive/caulking section and like the link will specifically say "drywall" on the label. But mechanical fasteners will still be needed to hold it in place while the adhesive sets up.
 
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Old 02-17-18, 11:02 AM
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Back again. Still needing to refinish this bathroom. I primed the upper part of the wall and am now ready to tackle the bottom area thatís pictured in this thread. The easiest way to do it, I think is to put up green board which is what I wanted to do originally. I still donít know how I would attach it to the plaster/concrete/whatever it is.

Liquid nails was suggested, but how would I keep pressure on the board to make sure it sets properly? I tried to screw through the plaster/concrete/whatever with longer drywall screws, and they wonít go through. Any more feedback?

I donít want to re-tile it, but is that the easiest/best option? Is there anything more to this type of wall then thinset, tile, and grout? It would cost substantially more in materials, obviously, and, if I could, Iíd rather not.
 
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Old 02-23-18, 02:01 PM
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That looks like a stone wall. You will never get away with using greenboard or purple board. You need cement backer board but how you are going to get it flat on that subsurface is a challenge. You might be able to mount furring strips fastened to the stone or grout with plugs. Then the cement board to that and then the tiles.
 
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Old 02-24-18, 06:54 PM
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Even furring strips as I suggested is not the answer. The only good safe solution is to build a wall of 2wx4 lumber strongly attached to walls and ceiling and of course also the floor it rests on. and studs at 16". Then you have a base to attach your green board. It may be a bitter pill to swallow but not that expensive.
I had a similar situation where an appliance stuck out a few inches into the hall. So I put up a frame just l like mentioned and extended the wall out a few inches. Now it is just another wall.
\ When you build such a frame on the ground you must always make it 2" shorter than the ceiling height in order for it to swing up without hitting the ceiling. I saw this on tv. Then you put a twx 4 under it to bring it up. You should really cut away the drywall to nail it directly to the studs and joists but you can also do it through the drywall. It is only a decorative wall. You could just put up a curtain and call it a job done. Next thing to doityourself is don't do it at all.
 

Last edited by richard123vmt; 02-24-18 at 07:10 PM.
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Old 02-25-18, 11:52 AM
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Itís not a stone wall. Putting up another was is not possible. That would require moving the toilet, which would require breaking the tile and 9Ē cement floor.
 
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Old 02-25-18, 12:19 PM
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Hereís a picture of the whole bathroom. Everything below the pink is tile/thinset/whatever behind it.
 
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Old 02-25-18, 12:36 PM
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Something is causing the tile to delaminate from the wall. My suspicions are that the radiator is pumping out heat and instead of thinset, mastic was used to hold the tile to the wall. Mastic, when heated softens. Have you saved all the tiles or did they break when they came loose?
 
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Old 02-25-18, 12:58 PM
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They didn’t break, but I don’t think we saved them all. It’s all over the bathroom where they’re coming off.. The tile is nearly 100 years old. It’s original from when the house was built. You can see the indentations of the tile on the thinset/mortar/whatever. When a tile come off there’s literally nothing on the back except dust/very light grit.
 
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Old 02-25-18, 01:27 PM
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You can use greenboard on the right hand wall, but can't in the shower area. If original to the house, I am surprised they are falling off. The last 60 year old bathroom I demo'd took me over 4 days to knock down the walls and cement bed underneath. That is using power tools, nothing wanted to budge. Reminded me that I am getting on in age and not a youngling anymore.
 
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Old 02-25-18, 01:32 PM
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Yeah, shower is cement board. I did my shower.

Greenboard would be ideal, but I donít know how to attach it? I would do as you suggested months ago, but I know how to attach it to the thinset/mortar/whatever. I can use the adhesive as suggested, but I donít know how to keep it in place as it dries? Or do I put greenboard up and drill pilot holes through cement to the studs and the dive drywall screws through that?
 
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Old 02-25-18, 02:37 PM
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I have in the past hung drywall on cement walls. First I spread drywall adhesive on the back of the drywall I then push it into place. I then drill small holes through the drywall and into the cement wall The hole has to be smaller than the head of a screw and you can not waffle on the hole or it will enlarge the drywall hole. Straight and perfect. I then took a piece of scrap pressure treated lumber and whittled a long sliver of it and inserted it into the hole and pushed it into the cement wall hole. Then you drive a screw into the hole, the wood helps it grab and it pulls the drywall tight so that the adhesive can do its thing.
 
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Old 02-26-18, 08:00 PM
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Isee. It is cement blocks but how level is it? You should put a stick to it to see how even it is. This includes small protrusions. which must be removed. If you do enough preparation there is no reason you can't glue the green board to the wall, bonding on all or many bricks. How to hold it there? You could make sufficient extra spots of contact dement on both the boards and the adjacent bricks and then wait 20 minutes or until the glue dries. Then it will bond instantly and hold the boards. But I would depend on something thick like liquid nails for most of the bond.
Or, you could build a dead man out of lumber to lean against the wall evenly to hold it in place.
 
 

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