Add master bath addition or convert bedroom?

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  #1  
Old 03-10-18, 10:53 AM
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Add master bath addition or convert bedroom?

I have a 3 bedroom 1 bathroom rental home I am thinking of selling this year and am contemplating either converting one of the small bedrooms into a bathroom or adding a master bath addition. The addition would obviously cost more upfront, but I'm looking for the highest return on investment. A 3 bedroom house with only one bathroom isn't very appealing to a lot of buyers. I'd think a 2 bed 2 bath would be more appealing between the two. 3 bed 2 bath would be much more appealing, but more time, effort, and money. If it will pay off, then I would be willing to take this on. Definitely not going to hire the same builder that did my addition . At the very least, I could draw up some plans for a master bath addition and get a few estimates to provide a prospective buyer in order to show them they have options. Although I'm not sure this would really help.
 
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Old 03-10-18, 11:33 AM
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I suppose reducing to a 2 bed would not be a good idea, because then my comps would be lower priced townhomes (mine is a single family on 0.25 acres). That being said, my options are add a master bath addition or leave as-is and spend the money on upgrading the existing bathroom and kitchen. Leaning towards the latter unless an extra bath is really worth the effort.
 
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Old 03-10-18, 11:45 AM
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It might broaden your market . . . . but I doubt that it will yield a positive return on your investment (or your time).
 
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Old 03-12-18, 08:29 AM
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I don't think the ROI is going to be there with either project. I would not sacrifice a bedroom nor would I put on an addition unless I were planning on staying and using it.

While you were not specific about what they would be, the kitchen and bath upgrades sound like a better investment.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 09:26 AM
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While you were not specific about what they would be, the kitchen and bath upgrades sound like a better investment.
I agree this would likely be the best use of resources. I would install a new tile floor in the bathroom and maybe a new tub/shower combo (vanity and commode are new), and possibly new cabinets/countertops in the kitchen. Although the existing ones aren't terrible. I could just paint them and install new hardware.

One of my primary concerns is there is a sagging floor joist that spans half of the house directly under the bathroom, which has cause some tiles to crack. I already put a jack post under the joist to support it, but I doubt it would pass a home inspection as-is. Sistering up the joist would be a PITA because there is a lot of plumbing passing through it. I'm not sure I could even get a 12 foot 2x10 down into the crawlspace. I'd have to remove one of the foundation vents, which would be destructive (they are cast into the concrete). Would placing a jack post on a concrete deck pier resting on top of a 2x10 pressure treated block suffice for an inspection? The top of the post would be secured to the sagging joist with blocking.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 09:34 AM
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Are you able to install a permanent post?
 
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Old 03-12-18, 09:45 AM
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Are you able to install a permanent post?
I don't see why not. You're suggesting pouring a small footing, installing a post (4x4?) and bolting it to the joist? I'll have to check again, but I believe this particular joist runs under the hot water heater, near the tub, toilet, and vanity, kitchen cabinets, and there's a wall above as well (non-load bearing wall). That being said, would a 6x6 post be more suitable? How thick would my footing need to be? Part of me wants to do the minimum to satisfy an inspector, but the other part of me would like to correct the sagging floor by sistering the joist Not sure what to do.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 10:03 AM
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Another reason sistering may be the better option is because no one would know any different. Whereas having a post visible highlights that there is/was an issue and may turn potential buyers away. I think most of the plumbing that goes through that joist is 4" PVC, so it may not be as much of a PITA as I think. Although I envision cracking drywall and tiles popping off the wall. Nothing I can't fix. I should have been cranking up the post a little at a time over the past couple years, but have neglected to do so

The crawlspace hatch is about 3'x3' and the crawlspace about 3' deep, so I believe I should be able to fit a 12' 2x10 through it.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 10:07 AM
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You're there and can see it so your opinion will count more than mine as to a post or sistering but, if you go post, I would likely choose 6x6.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 10:15 AM
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What size footing would I use? Digging a hole and pouring a footing with only 3 feet of headroom sounds like a real hassle.
 
  #11  
Old 03-12-18, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by mossman
". . .One of my primary concerns is there is a sagging floor joist that spans half of the house directly under the bathroom, which has cause some tiles to crack . . ."
Would the New Master/Bath Addition have solved this problem ?

Attending to this noticeable saging seems to be a far more important use of resources . . . . just to facilitate a smooth problem-free Sale.

Making design improvements just to satisfy the tastebuds of some future unknown Buyer doesn't usually pan out. As a Real Estate Broker, I can say that way too much money has been spent (wasted) by Sellers trying to second-guess what will make their property more appealing to the future random Buyer who happens to light on it for who-knows--what-reason.

The greatest ROI is usually achieved by simply improving the landscaping and curb appeal . . . . but if you have an obvious structural problem, that's where you need to focus your energy.
 

Last edited by Vermont; 03-12-18 at 11:22 AM.
  #12  
Old 03-12-18, 11:04 AM
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Attending to this noticeable saging seems to be a far more important use of resources . . . . just to facilitate a smooth problem-free Sale.

Making design improvements just to satisfy the tastebuds of some future unknown Buyer doesn't usually pan out. As a Real Estate Broker, I can say that way too much money has been spent (wasted) by Sellers trying to second-guess what will make their property more appealing to the future random Buyer who happens to light on it for who-knows--what-reason.

The greatest ROI is usually achieved by simply improving the landscaping and curb appeal . . . . but if you have an obvious structural problem, that's where you need to focus your energy.
Renovating the existing bathroom will require shoring up this joist, so it needs to be done regardless. I agree that curb appeal goes a long way and that I should concentrate my efforts on improving what is there and not trying to add on to appeal to some future unknown buyer. The main point of my post was to determine if a 3 bed 2 bath would significantly boost the value of the home. Sounds like the consensus is that it would not be worth it. I agree.
 
  #13  
Old 03-12-18, 11:28 AM
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A local Real Estate Agent should be willing to provide you with a CMA (Competitive Market Analysis) and show you comparable sales from the past 6-12 months within a reasonable radius of your home and even calculate the increased sales proceeds achieved with the extra bath and/or bedroom . . . . using actual Sales figures: NOT what the Asking Prices that those homes were listed for; but the Price that they actually Closed at.
 
  #14  
Old 03-12-18, 01:45 PM
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A local Real Estate Agent should be willing to provide you with a CMA (Competitive Market Analysis) and show you comparable sales from the past 6-12 months within a reasonable radius of your home and even calculate the increased sales proceeds achieved with the extra bath and/or bedroom . . . . using actual Sales figures: NOT what the Asking Prices that those homes were listed for; but the Price that they actually Closed at.
Right, of course.............................
 
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