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easy to re-caulk quartz countertop seams/sink seam?

easy to re-caulk quartz countertop seams/sink seam?

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  #1  
Old 07-04-19, 09:49 AM
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easy to re-caulk quartz countertop seams/sink seam?

Our kitchen is now ~2 years old and the caulk in the quartz countertop joints behind the sink, and a small section between the sink top and counter are deteriorating (see pics). Is it safe to just clean out all the caulk within the deteriorating areas and smear in some new? I'm not sure what type is in there now, but I am guessing silicone? Should the caulk at the back splash seam be the same type as between the top of sink and counter?

fyi- the chunk that is ripped out between sink/counter I did by accident when trying to scrub a stain out of it too hard..
 
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  #2  
Old 07-04-19, 11:05 AM
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Yes, or can use siliconized latex with micro-ban!
 
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Old 07-04-19, 11:11 AM
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Peel out anything that is loose and replace it. A plastic edged tool makes removal easier.
 
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Old 07-04-19, 12:15 PM
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Before caulking put some rubbing alcohol on a rag and shove it in the crack to help remove any soap scum and dirt.

Whichever caulk you choose I recommend using a solvent based instead of water based.
 
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Old 07-04-19, 01:01 PM
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If you use rubbing alcohol you will need to wait until it is TOTALLY dry before you caulk because silicone is repelled from anything wet with rubbing alcohol, and it will affect the adhesion otherwise.

I would recommend a high quality silicone, not the stuff on sale at the big box store. Dow Corning 795 would be an example.
 
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Old 07-04-19, 01:28 PM
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Thanks for the replies! Sounds like complete and clean removal / dry / and good silicone based caulk is the plan.
 
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Old 07-28-19, 10:04 PM
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Done and done.

Thanks again for the tips!
 
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