Fasteners for under cabinet/vanity shelves


  #1  
Old 02-15-21, 10:45 PM
wraiththe's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 55
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Fasteners for under cabinet/vanity shelves

Question: What would be the best screws or fasteners to attach shelf brackets to the cabinet walls under my sinks?
I am putting shelves under all my sinks.
First plan was wireframe,
Second plan was using16" melamine or mdf shelf panels supported by shelf pins and using a Shelf pin jig to make the holes.

It had occurred to me that the wood can be absorbent and may begin to smell musty eventually. 15 years and the cabinets do not smell now, but don't want it to happen. So I am going back to the original idea of wire shelves.
The plan is to use the std. Rubbermaid brackets, but using screws instead of the pins and drywall anchors.

The problem: I do not want the walls of the cabinet to tear apart. We have all seen what can happen to MDF when screws are used and bad things happen.
Fortunately, only one side wall on one cabinet has an outside surface. I would rather not risk messing that outside surface. It would be a disaster.
Here are some pics of the hardware, shelf and one cabinet/vanity. Any suggestions on how to fasten the brackes? Please?

Definitely needs a shelf!

They actually make smaller ones than these now.



(My original intent was to glue wood with a notch, to the side of the cabinet to hold the shelf in place... but I now I am trying to avoid porous and absorbent material under the sink.)

Maybe inserts would be the way to go, coated with some wood glue???

Not even sure what drill bits to use for these.
 

Last edited by wraiththe; 02-15-21 at 10:49 PM. Reason: to highlight the question and minimal info needed to answer the question.

Top Answer

 
02-16-21, 05:22 AM
Pilot Dane
Pilot Dane is offline
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,009
Received 2,236 Upvotes on 1,995 Posts
Best would be to glue and screw a wood block inside the cabinet to support the shelf. That way the load would be spread over a greater area and less chance of blowing out the particle board.
 
  #2  
Old 02-16-21, 05:22 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,009
Received 2,236 Upvotes on 1,995 Posts
Best would be to glue and screw a wood block inside the cabinet to support the shelf. That way the load would be spread over a greater area and less chance of blowing out the particle board.
 
Norm201, wraiththe voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 02-16-21, 06:22 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 10,969
Received 727 Upvotes on 643 Posts
When 1st reading this post, I also was thinking the same as PD.
I think you're over thinking the whole process.
I used pins to support a shelf under my kitchen cabinet under the sink. Just how heavy of material can you put on a under cabinet shelf?
 
wraiththe voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 02-16-21, 01:05 PM
wraiththe's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 55
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Pilot Dane,

Thought about this. Or even to put a strips of wood (glue, screw) to frame under the shelf, then screw the shelf into it.



I have been under a few sinks. Ours are amazingly dry and clean, but I seen my fair share of stinky ones. Either due to humidity or garbage bags... ICK. so keeping any new wood out would be a blessing. At least for cabinets under the sink.
 
  #5  
Old 02-16-21, 01:13 PM
wraiththe's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 55
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Norm 201

I am not sure how much weight. Just bottles of stuff . probably no more than 30 lbs at the very most. If a gallon of water is 7.5lbs, and I am putting lots of bottles of liquid... cleaners, soap, shampoo what ever.
Holding that up with six or eight pins???
 
  #6  
Old 02-16-21, 03:13 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
Another option that is extremly strong and does not require any hardware, cut 3/4" plywood to the height
of the shelf and depth of the cabinet, glue that to the sides, then a coat of stain & varnish, then set your shelf on top.

Rebuilt a couple of large pantry cabinets after the pins gave way, can probably put several hundred pounds in there now!
 
  #7  
Old 02-17-21, 06:10 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,413
Received 65 Upvotes on 56 Posts
I would suggest free-standing shelves. You will want to be able to remove the shelves when it comes time to do plumbing work.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
  #8  
Old 02-21-21, 12:50 PM
wraiththe's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 55
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Results.
Went with the 16" wireframes instead of wood. Saved quite a few bucks.

Turns out the wood is only 3/8 thick. Used #8 1/2" metal screws and Gorilla glue clear to secure the side brackets.

The screws just barely broke the surface and it is almost invisible and sort of blocked by the toilet paper roll. You have to really look hard or rub your hands over it to find them.

and

used the screws that came with the back brackets and gorilla glue.

It seems very solid

So, it is not perfect, I could stress out, but I am choosing not to... It is damn nice to have the shelves... damn nice.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: