Enlarge ceramic tile hole?


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Old 03-17-23, 05:56 PM
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Enlarge ceramic tile hole?

We demo'd the old bathroom. Can someone from your experience, tell what type of handles do these valves take?

Also when I went to remove these valves so I could go to Lowes for the handles, the holes in the tile are smaller. The valves have a lip that makes it impossible to pass through and come out. Basically I drilled small holes in those tiles during installation. Any ideas on how I can eventually be able to remove those valves?


 

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03-18-23, 01:24 PM
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I'm looking around but it looks like a universal faucet handle adapter.
The original knob would go on the splined shaft and have a screw in the knob.
 
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Old 03-17-23, 06:25 PM
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Either open up the wall to access the plumbing from the rear or get yourself a long expensive diamond core bit and make a wooden jig with a hole drilled in it as a guide for your hole saw.
 
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Old 03-18-23, 06:50 AM
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You stated that you installed the tile. That tells me you had attached the valve stems to the "tee" behind the wall after the tile install. So why can't you unscrew those stems?
Any big box store should have aftermarket handles to install on the stems. I assume the valve set still works or do you mean to replace the valve set?
 
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Old 03-18-23, 08:06 AM
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You could enlarge the holes with a Dremel tool and diamond bits. It will be slow, tedious work but it could be done. Make sure you don't nick the faucet.

When you enlarge the holes make sure you make them big enough. Before starting look at how your faucet is constructed. Most have a large hex that you need to get a wrench over for servicing so your holes need to be pretty large. You may want to buy your escutcheon's first so you know how large a hole they will cover.

 
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Old 03-18-23, 12:36 PM
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To answer a couple of questions above. Behind this wall is the kitchen, and a cabinet. It's only screwed in do if it came to it, I can always remove this cabinet and cut out the wall.

Attempting to unscrew the stem just opens water flow. It's whole, outer "thing" that you have to unscrew, to get to the valve stem.

I like the idea about Dremel. Similarly, Someone suggested to use a multi tool & diamond blade to cut out the two tiles, then break them as needed. I still have extra tiles left over.

​​​​


 

Last edited by bambata; 03-18-23 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 03-18-23, 01:04 PM
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There's this thing that's tightened over the stem, then the round handle goes over it.
Does this help to identify what type of handles I need?



 

Last edited by PJmax; 03-18-23 at 01:23 PM. Reason: resized pics
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Old 03-18-23, 01:24 PM
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I'm looking around but it looks like a universal faucet handle adapter.
The original knob would go on the splined shaft and have a screw in the knob.
 
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Old 03-18-23, 01:35 PM
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Yep, Agree with PJ. It's an adapter for an usually acrylic handle.
If the faucet works fine then just buy new ones. If you're replacing the valve set, break the tile and replace with the spare that you have.
 
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Old 03-18-23, 01:37 PM
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It's a Danco 80020.
 
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Old 03-19-23, 11:52 AM
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Bingo that sure looks like it. And last 2 are available at local HD. Are these made in chrome only, we are installing nickel satin fittings. I can't seem to find them nickel satin.
 
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Old 03-19-23, 12:56 PM
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I doubt you will find them in nickel satin. You should be able to find them in acrylic. They don't need to be DANCO, but they are the most popular after market faucet handles. Remove the existing ones on the stem. A new kit will include new adapters.
Understand that Danco did not make the valve set and that those handles you have had were not the originals. If you want the original handles you need to find out who made the valve set (Moen, Delta, etc...) and maybe they will have replacement you can buy.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 12:20 PM
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Found them in acrylic. at HD. here, thank you guys.

Now the diverter stub is 4.3/8th in. length, threaded type. This Danco spout (here) has a 5in. reach. I am wondering why it doesn't swallow the stub completely? How are these things sized? What would be the correct size for this length of stub? I doubt the Danco metal wall escutcheon (here) will help the close the gap completely.

 
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Old 03-23-23, 12:40 PM
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Measure the distance from the back of the spout to the wall. Lets say it's 1/2". Then remove the pipe nipple and measure it. Then get one that is the right length. (to the closest 1/2") For instance if your pipe nipple is 5", get a 4 1/2" pipe nipple. Be sure you get galvanized pipe. When you put the new nipple in, use both teflon tape and TFE paste on the threads. (Both ends)

As you tighten it, check your measurement back to the wall and make sure you're getting it the right length... shorter than/comparing it to your measurement in post #12, first photo. Don't tighten the pipe nipple as tight as humanly possible. You want it to snug up when you turn the spout on, and turning the nipple too far in might prevent that from happening.
 
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Old 03-23-23, 05:01 PM
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Wait! Is the valve set that the diverter screws into brass? If so, you would be better off using a copper stub instead with a slip fit. It's not a big deal but if you can use a copper or brass stub that would be better.
Brass and iron pipe has a galvanic corrosion affect and the iron pipe will begin get smaller in diameter restricting flow.
 
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Old 03-24-23, 12:48 PM
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No, it's a copper stub. I am thinking if the one I ordered online doesn't work out, I will cut off the threads and do a slip on type. I measured the copper pipe part without the threads part, it's 3"5/8th in length.
 
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Old 03-24-23, 03:21 PM
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Yeah, if its copper you should use a brass pipe nipple. All I saw was that your old one looked like it was galvanized.
 
 

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