tear out shower & closet - put in tub


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Old 11-28-01, 08:16 PM
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Question tear out shower & closet - put in tub

I've destroyed my bathroom! My plan was to put new tile on the floor and one thing has led to another until I have nothing in my bathroom except a closet and a tile shower.

What I would like to do now is just keep on going with my destruction and take out the shower and the closet and add a bathtub instead. My concern is this......will my pipes and drain from the shower work for a tub? The shower is beside the closet and the faucets are on the wall against the closet so they would be like in the middle of the bathtub instead of against a wall.

Also....what order do I need to go in? I've almost finished taking down ALL the sheetrock in the room and all the morter out of the floor. I'm going to have to replace the subfloor and am hoping not to have to use and inch and a half of morter this time like whoever put down the last stuff did. I'm thinking I need to do subfloor, then tub, then sheetrock, then paint, then tile (with morter beneath it), then cabinet and commode.....is that the best order?

Any suggestions are very appreciated....I'm feeling a little overwhelmed, but I'm having fun!!!
 
  #2  
Old 11-30-01, 12:29 PM
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To answer your first question: Yes, your pipes and drain for the shower will work for the tub, BUT you will have to move (extend)them...the hot and cold lines to the wall at the head of the tub and the drain trap to under the tub drain hole.
And remember, sooner or later, you're going to need to get to the tub faucet and drain for repairs or replacement through the back of that wall. You might want to leave an access panel in that wall on the side opposite the tub.
To answer your second question: If I were putting new flooring into a bathroom (and I've done it, and this is exactly what I did), I would use 3/4" pressure-treated plywood for the subfloor and 5/8" pressure-treated plywood for the flooring. Use screws. If the bathroom is over a crawlspace or basement, add a layer of roofing felt between the plywood layers as a vapor barrier.
Screw 1/2" cement board down on top of the new flooring and smooth out all seams and screws before mortar and tiling.
Remember to set your toilet flange on TOP of the new tile level (use masonry bit in your drill to drill anchor holes for the flange through the tile).
Your order of jobs is o.k., although I would consider painting last, but that's your call. You don't say what kind of tub or tub/shower unit you're considering, but you might want to put greenboard behind it, instead of regular sheetrock.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 11-30-01, 12:52 PM
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Thanks for the answers and suggestions......I can put an access panel in the back of a closet that is beside the bathroom.

I was thinking that I would use greenboard in the entire bathroom. Is that good or bad or neither?

I'm pretty sure that I'll go with a cast iron tub. I had wanted to get one of the fiberglass onepiece tub/shower dealies but now I've figured out that I can't get it through my doors.....So, I guess I'll use cast iron and buy a separate wall surround thing.

Thanks again.....I'm sure I'll be back with more questions.........

Cheryl
 
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Old 11-30-01, 02:57 PM
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You know that you can get 2 and 3 piece shower and tub units to fit through narrow doors?
When you get everything torn out, and you're ready to begin with the new, start with the plumbing lines and any electrical lines (GFCI protected especially) that need to be installed in your new bathroom, and we'll help you as you go.
You FIRST need to plan this out and establish the budget for it, and then make adjustments from there.
Mike
 

Last edited by Mike Swearingen; 11-30-01 at 06:56 PM.
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Old 11-30-01, 09:23 PM
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What does GFCI protected mean?

I am going to have to do some kind of electrical because I need an outlet....can you believe there's only one plugin in the whole room and that's on the light fixture??? I've got a buddy that does some electrical work though and I'm counting on him helping me with that. Surely it can't be too hard with the walls out and all......

The shower is coming down this weekend! I'll be back......

Cheryl
 
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Old 12-01-01, 03:00 AM
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Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter circuits for outlets are required by electrical code now in kitchens and baths, and outdoors.
They are made to trip VERY easily to prevent electrocution, such as when an electric hair dryer is dropped in a sink or tub of water.
You can get a GFCI breaker for an entire circuit, or an individual outlet (you've seen them...they have Test buttons on them).
If you put a GFCI outlet as the first outlet in a circuit, then all other outlets past them in that circuit are also GFCI protected, so you probably need one in your bath room, as the first one of 2 or 3 outlets.
Your electrical work buddy should be able to re-wire the bath for you properly.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 12-01-01, 02:26 PM
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Oh yeah.....I know the type outlet you're talking about.....Thanks!
 
 

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