Shower drain


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Old 12-20-01, 02:15 PM
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Question Shower drain

I am replacing a shower pan in a 40+ year old house. I'm ready to remove the old shower pan but examining the drain shows no obvious way to disconnect the drain pipe from the pan. It appears that the drain pipe may be joined with the drain collar with lead, as the material between the drain pipe and the collar in the pan is soft and can easily be scratched with a knife.

I have not crawled under the house yet to examine the fittings from below, as it a fairly demanding undertaking to get to the shower area.

Is it possible to disconnect the shower pan from the drain pipe from above or will I need to crawl under the house? Will I need to heat the fittings to disconnect them?

Thanks in advance for any guidance, any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 12-20-01, 06:50 PM
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It's difficult to answer without actually seeing it, but you may be able to remove the old shower pan, saw off the lead drain from above, and attach a new drain pipe with a no-hub connector before installing the new shower pan.
You may not need to heat the lead pipe.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 12-20-01, 08:57 PM
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re: shower drain

Mike,
Thanks for the reply. I'll post what I find when I get the pan out and it might give you a better idea what kind of connection I have.

Thx.

RR
 
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Old 12-21-01, 01:27 AM
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40+ years means that it is probably a lead pipe into a cast iron drain/waste/vent pipe system.
A no-hub connector (aka Fernco coupling, to name a major brand) is a rubber sleeve with two large hose clamps to seal it onto the ends of two connecting pipes.
If you have enough space, you may be able to connect the old piece of lead pipe to a brass or PVC white plastic shower drain.
Good Luck!
Mike
 
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Old 12-21-01, 01:30 PM
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More about shower drains

Mike,

The shower drain piping is 1 1/2" copper tubing, apparently sealed with lead.
What I'm supposed to do, according to the Home Center guy, is hacksaw the pipe just below the current drain fitting, then find a rubber connecting boot that fits over my new 2" plastic drain fitting on one end and the 1 1/2" copper tubing on the other. Seems sort of hokey, how long will the rubber last? But there doesn't seem to be fittings like the old ones anymore.

R
 
  #6  
Old 12-21-01, 02:31 PM
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R,
He's right. What you have, apparently, is a braised copper shower drain.
That rubber connecting boot is the no-hub connector (Fernco coupling) that I was talking about, too, and is the same thing.

No-hub (Fernco) Coupling
That's the way to go.
Most are made of neoprene rubber (like shoe heels), and will outlast you and me. (Well, maybe me. LOL)
Drains are under no water "pressure", even if they plug up,so you don't need to worry about it lasting.
Good luck!
Mike
 
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Old 12-21-01, 03:10 PM
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shower drain (con't)

Mike,

I was able to find a rubber coupling like the one you showed in your last post. It is a 2" (for the drain fitting) by 1 1/2" (for the copper drain pipe) and seems to fit everything so far. Now I just have to saw off the pipe at the right level, taking into account the drain's height above the subfloor, hmmm. (Measure once, cut twice? Wait, that's not right!)

;-)

Thx for your help!

R
 
 

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