removing linoleum from wood floor


  #1  
Old 12-29-01, 01:07 PM
nntrixie
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removing linoleum from wood floor

We are currently removing layers of flooring in 1930's addition kitchen in our home. Our plan is to sand and varnish the original pine flooring. The last (or first layer) is old 1930's linoleum. It is truly linoleum with the black, tar like backing. We are able to remove the linoleum, but in most places, it leaves a lot of the black backing.

We are probably going to rent a floor sander and I am wondering if the sander would remove this black goo or if it will just heat it and make a bigger mess.

Any suggestions. Thanks in advance
 
  #2  
Old 12-29-01, 01:26 PM
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Removing adhesive from wood floor

Adhesive should be removed prior to sanding. Check first to see if the adhesive is water soluble. If not, use an environmentally friend citrus based solvent and scraper. Go to www.finishingwoodfloors.com for some helpful info.
 
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Old 12-30-01, 07:48 AM
nntrixie
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removing linoleum from wood floor

Thanks, twelvepole, for the reply.

The stuff on this floor is definitely not water soluble.

It is probably a petroleum based product. It is not an adhesive, just the backing from the old linoleum. Some of it has hardened and some is still rather soft. This is a very old product, nothing that we normally see today.

I am afraid if I use a solvent to dissolve this, it will soak into and stain the wood.

Someone suggested that I rent a hand-held planer - any comments?
 
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Old 12-30-01, 02:20 PM
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Removing linoleum from wood floor

Some forum posters have reported using a heat gun and scraper. I recently spoke with someone who told me they successfully removed their floor covering and adhesive by heating with the wallpaper steamer and scraping.

The National Hardwood Organization reports that most old lineoleum was installed using a tar-based adhesive. Their recommendation is to use mineral spirits and a thin scraper, taking care not to damage the wood and always scraping in the direction of the wood grain. Mineral spirits tend to be flammable, volatile, and smelly, thus forum posters tend to recommend the environmentally friendly citrus-based strippers like Goo Gone or DeSolvIt. Heavy duty scrapers are not recommended because of potential damage to wood. The Hardwood Organization states that in some instances a heat gun can be used. Removing adhesive can be a challenge and requires patience. Do a section at a time, applying solvent to the area to allow it soften adhesive, scrape and wipe residues with old rags. By doing a section at a time the solvent cleaner should not damage the floor.

Many floor coverings installed before 1986 may have contained asbestos in the floor covering as well as the adhesive. It is recommended that one should never sand on any residue that may contain asbestos. Certified asbestos removers are recommended for flooring that contains asbestos.
 
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Old 12-31-01, 04:46 PM
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I am in the middle of the same lovely job! I have tried a hand planer, it does get some more of the black tar-like stuff off but doesn't get it down to the wood. Obviously I am here looking for a solution too. Atleast I intend to reocver my floor with linoleum again so I am not having to be too concerned with maring the wood. Good luck!
 
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Old 12-31-01, 05:10 PM
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Removing linoleum from wood

If you planning on reinstalling a vinyl product over wood, most manufacturers will void their warranty if their new product is not installed over a fresh luan underlayment (one recommended for vinyl). Thus, it is not necessary to to clean the subfloor down to perfection. Actually, many install luan over old floor covering and install new vinyl on fresh luan.
 
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Old 12-31-01, 05:17 PM
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I am actually going to have linoleum put on the floor again, not vinyl. I don't want to end up with a slight step up into the kitchen so I am attempting to get most of the gunk off. I assume they will still put some kind of skim coat or some such thing on top of the wood to make it smooth and fill in any irregularities. Maybe I am making more work for myself than I need to. Thanks for you info.
 
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Old 12-31-01, 06:13 PM
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Installing linoleum

Where did you find linoleum? I thought everything was vinyl these days? I have read that some manufacturers were offering some of the retro patterns of the old linoleums. Floor coverings as they use to be have changed because of EPA regulations re: chemicals and other contents. Many of the old flooring products and adhesives contained asbestos. As long as the underlayment material is super smooth and any irregularities patched with a recommended patch to make for a super smooth finish, then you should have no problems. Make sure you use recommended adhesives and seam seals. Following manufacturer's instructions is always best.
 
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Old 01-01-02, 07:16 AM
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http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/thisoldhouse.../linoleum.html
This site has some good info. on linoleum...
There is a store in Boulder, Colorado, Planetary Solutions, that sells it and has installers that know how to install it. Thanks again
 
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Old 01-01-02, 03:48 PM
nntrixie
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Thanks again twelvepole,

This was all over some original heart-of-pine flooring and I plan to sand and varnish that. It is a little worn and now has some nail holes, but I think that will add to the character.

Actually, we scraped about 1/3 of the floor today with a no-handle hoe that my husband sharpened somewhat. We went board by board. This seemed to work (with a lot of elbow grease). Pine is easily damaged, so we are being very careful.

As for putting any type flooring over an old wood floor, I would always put luan or some type over it first. This I learned from experience.

Thanks everyone for the great discussion
 
  #11  
Old 02-17-02, 09:13 PM
tanko
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me too

i too am remodelling an old home.unfortunately i am a mechanic and not familiar with home improvements.i pulled of the luan and linoleumand under the luan there was tar.fortunately only about a 12*12 area.i tried paint and tar remover and all that crap,a little sanding wheel on a drill,which melts it.i had to end up scraping it dry.i find its best not to use something too sharp so it wont damage the floor.good luck
 
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Old 02-18-02, 09:51 AM
nntrixie
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Good Luck, Tanko.

We are done removing all the old stuff. There is a little bit of black tar like substance left. Just in spots. It has almost crystallized, so we can scrape it up.

We haven't done the final cleaning and sanding (only where needed in a few spots) as we need to paint and I wanted to get the painting done and do the floor last. But I think it will work.

I hope you get all the tar off. It must be some form of 'vintage' adhesive, or possibly part of the old linoleum.

Again Good luck.
 
 

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