bathtub R&R


  #1  
Old 06-05-02, 09:17 PM
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bathtub R&R

I want to replace the bathtub in my 5' x 8' bathroom. The 5' tub fits wall to wall opposite the door. Will the 5' tub stand up vertically to be removed and will the new tub fit going from vertical {to get it in the room} to its resting place horizontally? IF so, HOW! I cannot see how it can be done!

I will be doing a complete remodel of the bathroom so the sink and toilet will be out of the way. All of the bathroom walls will be torn out down to the studs but I do not want to cut the walls on the opposite side.

{I previously posted this in plumbing}
 
  #2  
Old 06-06-02, 09:41 AM
diemeto
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with everything removed it should come out, they got it in there right? they certainly did not build the walls around it. Get everything out and walls to studs and get a helper to pull it away from the wall and out. New tub goes in same way. its tight but it will work
 
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Old 06-06-02, 10:09 AM
masterjoe
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Talking Get 1-2 helpers

I had to do the same thing that you're planning to do.
My bath is 5'x8' as well and I ripped out the old one and replaced with a whirlpool tub.
My best suggestion, from my own experience, is to cut the old tub into pieces(if it's a fiberglass tub) with a reciprocating saw(AKA Sawz-All), since you're probably never gonna use that tub again.
It'll save you some time and hard labor to bring out the old tub in one piece.

When you bring in the new one, it's easier to move it sideways into the bathroom, let it stand vertically, tilt it about 45 deg, bring it into the slot diagonally, set one edge down and slowly bring the other edge down to its place.
Unless you're putting in a whirlpool tub which is substantially heavier than a regular tub, it's not too hard with a couple of helping hands.
 
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Old 06-06-02, 07:19 PM
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Actually the walls WERE formed around the bathtub when they built the house. My neighbor built my house, his house and all of the houses on my street in 1960. He said one week he and the boys set all of the ceramic coated cast iron tubs before the carpenters arrived so they would not have to mess with the walls! I told him I wanted to replace the tub and he is STILL laughing at me!

It looks like I will have to bust up the tub to get it out since it is cast iron.
 
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Old 06-07-02, 09:48 PM
Newkote
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Does not sound like a DIY PROJECT

Does not sound like a DIY PROJECT
 
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Old 06-07-02, 11:45 PM
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A cast iron tub can be broken up with a maul for removal. (Wear safety glasses.) Cast iron tubs are very. very heavy from 200-400 lbs. It is a common practice for walls to be built around the tub. The problem with removal is that no matter which way you twist it (up or side to side) the area that the tub occupies will become longer than the five foot opening. I am assuming that you have one finshed side (what you see outside the tub). When you tilt the tub up on one end (say the right end is being lifted) the top left will hit the wall and the bottom right will hit the wall. With the wall removed down to the studs, you may be able to lift the tub and and move it out of the room on end. You will have to slide it clear of the plumbing before you lift it. An easier way may be through the wall of an adjacent room by sliding the tub out from one end.
 
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Old 06-08-02, 06:01 AM
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Dirty Dan's post is a 100% accurate description of what I am going to run into! The tub is open on three sides - one long end ans the two short ends. If you lift the lower right side the upper left side would hit the studs - and vice versa. I really do not want to take out a wall and I have not heard good things about reglazing either. I just don't know ow long I can stand a 1960's Florida lime green and neon pink bathroom!

Any other suggestions? {I have already tried the dark sunglasses to cut the glare}
 
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Old 06-08-02, 06:23 AM
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If you can stand not having a tub, bust the old one up to remove and convert the space to a shower stall instead.
 
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Old 06-08-02, 06:39 AM
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Converting the space to a shower would be my first choice also. The problem is my house is a 2-1 and everyone tells me not having a tub in one bathroom {and I only have one bathroom} would lower the value of the house. Plus I have a niece and nephew who needs a tub.
 
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Old 06-09-02, 03:16 AM
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I've never done this before, but in looking at the tub in my house it appears that the front (exposed) side is the only side that goes wall to wall. The end opposite the faucet is sloped, so it seams to me that if the sheetrock is off, you could lift that end; the front "skirt" at the bottom would pivot into the stud space and the sloped bottom would tend to clear the studs at that end; MAYBE! I would try doing some careful measurements of diagonal dimensions.

Incidently, I faced the same problem about 6 years ago in a rental duplex I own. I opted to re-glaze the tubs (about $175 each at the time) and they still look fairly good, even with the tenant that only cleans about once every 3 months.

Bruce
 
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Old 06-09-02, 09:56 AM
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Thanks Bruce {and everyone else},

I did some measurements as you {and a few other I have spoken with} and we all have come to the same conclusion - MAYBE it will work. So I think for now I might go with your {and others} suggestion and reglaze the tub for now then redo the bathroom if and when the reglazed tub is no longer holding up.

Was there a particular technique or company you used to reglaze your tubs? Anything I need to watch out for? Could they reglaze the tile surround also?

Thanks again to everyone who replied to this and my other posts.
 
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Old 06-09-02, 12:21 PM
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It was too long ago to remember who did the job. I initially went to the yellow pages and spent a lot of time talking to the contractors. Did not go with the lowest price. The guy that did the job did a lot of prep work: masking sanding, etc. The whole job took about 3/4 of a day for the 2 tubs; he would spray, then sit around waiting for it to partially dry, then spray again. Must have put on at least four or five coats.
Don't know if it would work on the surround; I had torn out the old fiberglass surround and installed new ceramic.

Bruce
 
  #13  
Old 06-12-02, 10:22 PM
Stutie
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The trick to removing tubs is to first remove the tile and sheetrock behind it (5 foot wall to top of tile) and above both ends of the tub up to tile line and in front of both ends for 4 inches or more up to next stud. Unscrew drain assembly with a cross-shaped drain removal tool. Unscrew overflow cover plate and pull out any cover and connected drain plug and rods. The top of the tub is usually nailed to 2 or more studs along the back 60 inch side.

Slide out the tub toward the door at least 4 inches. Now it is clear of the studs and can be raised at the shallow end (not at the water valve end) to vertical with tweo strong people. My tubs weigh 60-80 pounds. Cast iron may be harder to lift.
 
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Old 06-13-02, 05:49 AM
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Is the reistallation of the new tub the same process in reverse?
 
 

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