Double Hung Sash Windows


  #1  
Old 11-09-02, 10:34 PM
CDS
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Question Double Hung Sash Windows

I need to build the lower half of a double hung sash window. Is there a book on how to? I need info on router bits to use and steps on the cuts. Thank You
 
  #2  
Old 11-10-02, 06:21 AM
L
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Location: Arlington, WA
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No, you won't find a book telling you exactly what bits to use and exactly what cuts to make. You will have to study the old sash and the frame it goes into and copy the old old as nearly as possible.

Why do you ask?
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-02, 02:15 PM
CDS
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A reply to Lefty: One of my windows has rotted out. I can see the construction of the sash frame, but I don't know how to make these joints. I may need info on basic joinery for windows. These windows were made out of pine and are about 60 yrs old.Most of what I see in the construction I think it is called tenioned. Thanks much for the speedy input. CDS
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-02, 03:33 PM
Tn...Andy
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Most older wood windows use mortise and tenon joints to hold the four parts of the sash frame together. It's an "open" type tenon joint where there is basically a slot cut in one part and a stub tenon that goes into the slot vs. a "closed" or hidden tenon like you see in furniture where two pcs of wood seem to just butt into each other with no apparent means of joining....the tenon goes in a hidden square hole, the mortise.

Then you have to shape or route the inside edge of the sash frame for the glass to set in, and do the grid work if you sash has individual small panes. You can buy sash/glass cutting set for a router, but the pattern you find may or may not match your existing sash, depending on the pattern the orignal maker used.
Look in woodworking catalogs under router bits ( unless you have a shaper). Jesada.com carries some....

If you can carefully take the orginal sash apart, you can sorta reverse engineer the cuts and assembly. I'll tell you one thing, there is a HECK of a lot of woodworking skill that goes into something that looks so simple !

A book called Handcrafted Doors and Windows will help some....also if you can find some OLD Audels books on finish carpentry......there are others I'm sure, but you're looking for old time carpentry.
 
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Old 11-10-02, 04:33 PM
CDS
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Thank you very much. I am getting closer and closer to trying this window thing out. Thanks Again.
 
  #6  
Old 11-10-02, 07:03 PM
L
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CDS, I don't want to discourage you by any means, because there is so much pride involved in doing something like this yourself. But you are in for a lot of tedious woodworking, and it will have to be exact for the frame to be strong, and for it to match the existing frame. Realistically, you won't get a very weathertight seal between this sash frame and the window frame it is going into. You will spend as much or more on router bits to build this sash than it would cost to buy a new window. (And if you will buying shaper cutters, that cost just doubled or tripled!) But I am sure that you are aware of that.

Let us know how it turns out!
 
 

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