Extension jamb too wide

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  #1  
Old 11-13-03, 12:28 PM
Trallfaz
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Extension jamb too wide

Hi guys. I ordered a prehung fiberglass entry door from one of the box stores and I had the choice of a 4 9/16's inch jamb or a 6 9/16ths inch jamb depending on the width of my walls. The actual measurement of the wall was 5 9/16's inches and I picked the larger size to order. Will I have to trim an inch off of the jamb when it arrives in order to make it fit? If so, what is the easiest way to do that? Remove the brickmold? Install it first and trim later?
Thanks for any advice.
 
  #2  
Old 11-13-03, 01:45 PM
Tn...Andy
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No easy here.....You not only have to rip the jamb, you'll have to figure out WHAT you're gonna do about the sill......they make them wide to fit that 2x6 wall as well.......and most likely, the hinges are gonna be mortised on the room side, so if you rip that off, you'll be remortising hinges.....bummer..


WHAT I would do if you still can is CANCEL the order and get a 4 9/16" jamb, then add your own 1" wide pc from it to make an "extension".....that's how I do it.
 
  #3  
Old 11-13-03, 11:11 PM
L
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Trallfaz,

WHAT are you talking about??

If your wall is framed with 2X4's, you need the 4-9/16's jamb. If the wall is framed with 2X6's, you need th 6-9/16's jamb. Are you saying that your wall was framed with 2X5's?? Where did they get 'em??? Not from any lumber mill in the US or Canada!!

The math is simple. A 2X4 is 3-1/2" wide. Add 1/2" for the exterior siding, and either 1/2" or 5/8" for the interior sheetrock, and you are looking at either 4-1/2" or 4-5/8" of overall wall thickness. The door mfgrs. comprimise and make the jambs 4-9/16's". It works -- the 1/16" won't matter! (Same math with a 2X6, only it's 2" wider, so the wall is going to be 2" thicker.)

Oh, I see now!!

You went to one of the big box stores, and whoever waited on you didn't have a clue!! His problem, not your's -- One of the things he should have asked you was what your wall was framed with -- THAT determines the width of the jamb to order! If you weren't asked, it's THEIR PROBLEM!!!

Just for grins, remeasure the thickness of your wall. Was it built with 2X4's, or 2X6's?? If it's 2X6, you're fine. If it's 2X4, you'll be waiting a few weeks for the big box store to correct THEIR mistake! (And no, you AREN'T gonna pay for THEIR mistake!! -- Got it??)
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-03, 11:30 PM
L
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Oh, Trallfaz,

I forgot -- Welcome to DoItYourself.com, and the Door and Window forum therein. If I sounded a bit tough on you (at least at first) in the previous post, think nothing of it. Come in here often enough (2 or 3 times is about what it takes most folks!), and you'll begin to see that Andy or I SEEM to have an attitude (well, yeah, at times we DO, but it's usually with good reason!), but what we tell you is generally pretty accurate and true.

Mike
 
  #5  
Old 11-14-03, 06:43 AM
Trallfaz
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Lefty: I didn't know what the house was framed with when I ordered the door- the box store is an hour away so I described what I had measured to the sales guy the best that I could. The house is 100 years old and I was lead to believe that the plaster and lathe in the walls was to be included in the measurement. I will post a picture for you to look at so that you can see why I was confused. I have already paid for the door so I don't know if it can be returned at this time. What do you think guys?
 
  #6  
Old 11-14-03, 07:11 AM
Trallfaz
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I can't get the picture to post- sorry
 
  #7  
Old 11-14-03, 07:55 AM
H
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I'm also in the process of needing to order two interior prehung doors. The 4 9/16 will not work for me either. This is a 50 year old house and has thick plaster walls on one side and the other side was removed and new 1/2 inch sheetrock applied. I need a jam which is 1/2 inch wider. Looks like my best solution is to add a piece onto the jam.......or is there a better way.

Harlan.
 
  #8  
Old 11-14-03, 09:18 AM
Tn...Andy
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Nah, I don't "seem" to have an additude.....I ACTUALLY HAVE ONE ! ahahahahahaha.........and it changes from day to day depending on how bad my arthritis hurts

But today is a good day....

Yeah, in old houses, you do get into odd sizes.....things didn't start getting "standard" until the 50's or so.....and even then, there was a change in lumber size from 1 5/8" x 3 5/8" "2x4s" to 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" "2x4s" that we have today.

Old houses generally got un-planed lumber straight from a mill and had ACTUAL 2x4s.....and even those could run larger depending on the accuracy of the mill.....throw in lathing and plaster ( and sometimes a re-model with paneling or sheetrock on top that ) and you get some REAL oddball jamb sizes....

But like I said, I always UNDER size it in that case and add my own extension to it.....

IF you've ordered it and are stuck, you have couple differenc routes to go besides trying to cut the jamb down, which like I said is gonna be a REAL pain, and IF they use a wide aluminum sill, cutting the jamb down really isn't practical at all.....

Here's what I'd do: Either build the door "out" by putting a "filler" strip under the brickmould that will be on the door, so in effect, you move the door outward that inch or so you need.....Only problem with doing this is making it "look" decent on the outside......by wrapping the door with trim coil like I usually do, I could make it look OK, but you'll have to get creative with wood to pull this off.....

Next solution is mount the door as normal outside, and on the inside where the jamb will extend past the wall plane, run a pc of 1 by trim flat on the wall up to the jamb and then mount your casing on top that 1by........in effect, making a "thick" looking casing on this door......THAT would be my choice and probably the best looking.......

BUT, I'd call TODAY and see if you can cancel, because the way I'd prefer is to add my own extention of the right depth to match the wall thickness.


Harlan:

Yours will be less of a problem. First off, you don't have a "sill" on a interior door, so THAT is not a factor.......and you'll likely find you can order custom sized jambs for interior as a result ( they only make sill for exterior doors in a couple sizes to meet "stock" wall sizes....other wise, think of the stocking nightmare you'd have as a door maker )...You "may" even find a "split jamb" interior prehung door has enough play in it to make that 1/2" up, if you're using that type jamb.

But adding a pc onto the jamb ain't a real big deal either.....just pull the casing off, add it on and re-case that side.
 
  #9  
Old 11-14-03, 09:43 AM
Trallfaz
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Thanks Andy: That sounds like an exact description of my problem. I can see the framing inside of our pocket doors and it looks like unplaned red cedar throughout. I know that when I had a carpenter out to measure and bid new windows that he bid a 5 9/16ths extension jamb for them. So I'm going to call the box store and then if all else fails, I like the idea of building out the door as opposed to ripping the jamb. It never fails with this house that no matter what project we take on it ends up being twice the amount of work that we anticipated. I don't know what I would do without these forums- I'm glad I found this one.
 
  #10  
Old 11-14-03, 02:40 PM
brickeyee
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I have a collection of full size lumber from demos and remodels. It comes in really handy instead of padding planed lumber out to full size. Just finished working on a house with 3x5 studs. With lath and plaster on both sides. The walls ended up around 7 inches thick, but one place was 8. Someone put a little thicker plaster bed up. I never though a 16d nail needed a pilot hole till I tried nailing into 100+ year old southern yellow pine.
Measure twice, cut once.
Measure everything before you prep the bid.
 
  #11  
Old 11-14-03, 06:13 PM
L
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Trallfaz,

The guy at the big box store got you. He should never ask the customer "How wide of a jamb do you want?" -- He should ask "How thick is your wall?" and go from there.

I agree with Andy -- cutting an inch off of the jamb IS NOT a solution. It will only lead to more problems.

I would probably opt for Andy's 2nd solution -- install the door so that it is right on the outside, and add a fill to the inside wall before installing the casing.

Harlan,

Your's is easier. Install the door so that it is flush with the inside wall, and add a piece to the exterior side of the jamb to fill the gap.
 
  #12  
Old 11-14-03, 06:41 PM
Tn...Andy
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"Your's is easier. Install the door so that it is flush with the inside wall, and add a piece to the exterior side of the jamb to fill the gap."



HeHeHeHe.......Harlan has an interior door........


You're easier than my wife......ahahahahaha


OK, buddy, your turn to trip ME up........
 
  #13  
Old 11-14-03, 07:03 PM
L
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See if I ever take another speed reading course from Evelyn Woods!!!
 
 

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