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How to open a wall for an interior window/opening?

How to open a wall for an interior window/opening?

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  #1  
Old 01-03-04, 11:09 PM
stretching
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Question How to open a wall for an interior window/opening?

Hi, just remodeled my entire kitchen... but I now want to open up a wall for a large indoor window. Here's the situation...

The kitchen is separated from the formal dining room by a wall, a door is present on one end of the wall. The entire wall including the door is 15 feet. So from the edge of the door, I have about 11-12 feet of bare wall.

Some of my neighboors with similar floor plans have a window already, but since they didn't do it, they have no idea how to do it. I want to add a large opening, about 6 feet wide by 3 or 4 high in the bare wall area. I've been told that the wall is not load baring, and there's nothing in there other than a few electrical wires.

My question is mainly regarding how to frame the opening after I cut it open. I'm not looking to do anything fancy, just an opening that will be finished with drywall, maybe with a little ledge on the bottom.

Can someone give me a few pointers, or links to places with pointers on how to frame this? Well... any details, however vague or detailed would be much appreciated!

Thanks in advance. I can clarify anything if I have not stated them.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-04-04, 12:17 AM
bungalow jeff
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First you need to determine if this is a load bearing wall, or not. The easiest way is that the framing for the floor/ceiling above is perpendicular to a load bearing wall.
 
  #3  
Old 01-04-04, 12:20 AM
stretching
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Not load bearing

I think I mentioned that in the post. It is not. I've been up in the attic many times to install lights and speakers. All the beams run parallel to the wall... so what's next ?

thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 01-04-04, 06:11 AM
Tn...Andy
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Then you need to figure how you're gonna deal with the "few electrical wires"........some means of re-routing them if they run thru the new opening.


What type of exterior siding or masonary is on the wall ?
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-04, 07:24 AM
L
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Location: Arlington, WA
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Andy, this is an interior wall, if I'm reading correctly (but then, IT'S EARLY, so you never know about that!!:-o )

Stretching, start by removing the sheetrock on both sides of the wall where you want the window to be. Cut the 'rock to what you want the finished size of the opening to be. Any wires in the way will now be visible. Working from the dining room side, remove enough more 'rock so that you can move the wires, then frame the opening, rerock it, and finish it.
 
  #6  
Old 01-04-04, 02:14 PM
stretching
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moving forward

need more help guys...

i'm not worried about the wires, and not too worried about the drywalling. the exterior (of the interior walls) is stippled in the kitchen (which i have the paint and tools) and i'm not sure that the dining room texture is called... it's not knock off...

anyway, as lefty mentioned, "move wires, frame, rerock..."... my biggest question revolves around "framing". how do i frame it?

i'm going to cut from stud to stud on the left and right, then leave about a foot from the ceiling and about 40 so inches from the floor. so am i correct in assuming i really don't have to do much for the left and right side? really just frame the top and bottom of the hole? and what do i do, just hammer on a 2x4 and cover the edges with drywall? if someone could give me a details instruction list of how to properly frame this puppy, it'll be much appreciated...

thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-04, 06:53 PM
L
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Depends on where you want the opening, and how the existing studs are layed out.

If possible, I would put the opening between the existing studs -- use the right and left existing stud of the opening as the kings studs, and frame in from there. If you're really lucky, everything will work that way. Chances are, it won't.

King studs run full length from the bottom plate to the top plate. You need one on each end of the header. Then you need a trimmer stud at each end of the header -- run from the floor plate to the bottom of the header to support it. Cut the sill plate to go in that opening (it'll be 3" less in length than the header), then support each end of that with cripples. Finally, fill the space between the top of the header and the top plate with cripples, and the space between the floor plate and the bottom of the sill with cripples. These should be layed out on 16" centers as measured from one of the existing studs in the wall.

And that is probably about as clear as mud!!
 
  #8  
Old 01-04-04, 07:29 PM
stretching
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lefty, you are right... somewhat muddy it is...

i found this link: http://www.kreuzco.com/gb/wininstructions.html, look at picture 2, is that pretty much what i'm shooting for?

my opening will be rather large as i said, probably spanning across 4-5 studs. i was just thinking of going from stud to stud (it actually fits pretty well that way), then put a cripple on each end of the stud from floor to the bottom of the opening, same height as the other cut studs, then just lay a piece of 2x4 across it. and basically do the same for the top... is that what you in the post?

now, if it doesn't fall between studs (i was going to make it fall between, but it would be more symetrical if i didn't follow the studs), how do i secure the king studs? since this is just an opening for looks, can i just put a 2x4 on top of the cripples of the cut studs? bascially just make a frame with 2x4s and stick it in the opening i cut and secure it to the cripples of the cut studs? or is it gonna fall apart when i lean on it?

thanks again.
 
  #9  
Old 01-04-04, 10:31 PM
bungalow jeff
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That is exactly what Lefty is talking about, however, you can use doubled up 2x4's for your header since the wall is non-loadbearing. You just have to add addditional cripple studs above the header to support drywall.
 
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