Closet Door Trim

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Old 08-29-04, 06:29 PM
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Talking Closet Door Trim

Is there a reason why my closet door openings throughout the house (all four feet wide) do not have trim along the perimeter like most? It is just drywall nailed to the studs all the way around and the metal closet doors are added on to that. By the way the closet doors are 93 inches tall. Is that normal too? I hate these doors and was thinking about replacing them with standard 80" height doors with trim and everything, but there is no jamb or anything and do not know where to start. Thanks!
 
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Old 08-30-04, 12:41 PM
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Lightbulb

I have noticed a lot of newer houses don't have the trim around the closet doors, just a way of saving a few bucks on construction. The doors are framed and there is a metel corner bead put in place, this allows the texture to run to the edge of the door frame. Much like that of an outside corner of a wall.
So basically, you are looking at the frame work of the door, there is no "Jamb" per say.
The reason for the doors being 93" is that it makes it easier to access the upper shelf over the hanging clothes.
These are all "personal perferance" items of the contractor, designer and/or owner of the house.
 
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Old 08-30-04, 03:18 PM
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You have a couple of choices . You can fill in the upper portion with framing and drywall, or a decorative panel and then case the opening.
 
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Old 08-30-04, 04:18 PM
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What do you mean by case the opening?
 
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Old 08-31-04, 01:04 AM
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Casing is the moulding used around doors and windows. To case, is the action of applying the casing.
Trim, is a general reference to all wood moulding, installed.
 
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Old 08-31-04, 05:14 PM
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So, were the framing placed in those measurements on purpose to make a four-foot opening (after the drywall is installed), since no jamb is required to make it four feet?
 
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Old 08-31-04, 05:48 PM
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I will take a guess here and say the frame work has been covered with a piece of sheet rock, most likely 1/2".
If you would like to reduce the size of the doors, you will have to reduce the size of the framed hole. Not that big of a deal. It will require some demo and than rebuild and cover up.
 
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Old 08-31-04, 06:39 PM
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what is sheet rock?
 
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Old 08-31-04, 11:00 PM
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The opening you see was created with the intent of using a set of 4' doors, as a standard fit. If you will notice, there will be a space on one or both sides, when the doors are closed.
Sheetrock is another term for drywall.
 
 

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