to solve dampness with single-pane windows


  #1  
Old 10-04-05, 12:59 AM
fitchew
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
to solve dampness with single-pane windows

Ok, belgium here, in troubble:

i should construct a shop next months, with single-pane windows (obvious because the windows mustn't reflect), but it is for a flower-shop with looooads of plants in it?!

can i do this? i mean .. dampness and condens will in winter be all over the place?

passive ventilation ok .. but that won't solve all with single-pane windows in a flowershop

a low interrior heating device on the floor before the windows ok ..and apassiveventillation above the windows .. but man .. what a waste of energy...??

can anyone help meout?
thx,
dries
 
  #2  
Old 10-04-05, 04:30 AM
O
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 180
Received 12 Upvotes on 9 Posts
flower shop

good morning in Belgium,

I believe when you say that the windows must not reflect, you are refering to a LowE coating because of the health of the plants? If so, then I would say that there have been many studies that have shown that LowE coatings do not affect plant growth and that plants can very well thrive under LowE conditions... But, if this is your concern then I certainly understand your caution.
I can get more specific on the light frequencies affected by LowE coating and those that are needed for optimum plant growth if you would like.

I would suggest that you can get dual pane windows without LowE coatings as well. Although not nearly as efficient as a window with a LowE coating, the dual pane will help to control the condensation. A single pane window will be cold on the inside if it is cold on the outside. A dual pane window will be less cold on the inside, at the same external temperature, as the single pane - by better than half. And the temperature on the interior glass surface will determine if you have interior condenation on your windows. Plus, plants closer to the singel pane window will be more likely to be affected by the cold windows as well.

Condensation forms on a window when the glass temperature is below the dew point of the air. The dew point is when the air has reached the point where it can no longer hold anymore moisture, or 100% saturation, or 100% relative humidity (all the same thing). Relative humidity is based on the amount of water actually in the air versus the temperature of the air while the dew point is a factor of how much water. In other words, as temperature increases - and water volume stays the same - the relative humidity will decrease, but the dew point will not change, unless there is a change in the moisture level. A flower shop will have a great deal of moisture in the air and subsequently a very high dew point.

As you say, you need a great deal of ventilation to help control the moisture. I would recommend that you talk with a professional about your requirements in that area.

Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 10-06-05, 03:42 AM
fitchew
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thx for replying, i was out of town so i missed the instant-reply of my side.

First: i don't want reflexion from the sun on my double-pane windows for the person walking by: ifyou pass a double-pane window, it's very hard to look through it if the sun is on the window - for that reason almost all shops have single-pane windows, because if any potential customer is not attracted to your wares etalated .. you won't sell them neither.

Now, the problem with finding an expert on this "reflexion of sunlight vs dampness in a flowershop" - problem is that none has ever been dealing with a flowershop

therefor i came here

so if i understand it correctly it would be very hard to cope with single-pane windows in a flowershop? But if so .. what could i doto have my double-pane windows less reflecting?
 
  #4  
Old 10-06-05, 03:49 AM
fitchew
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
or what could i do to have the T of my windows rissen? place a heating in front of it?
 
  #5  
Old 10-07-05, 04:50 AM
O
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 180
Received 12 Upvotes on 9 Posts
dual pane

Unless your dual pane window has a reflective coating on it, which could cause a great deal of reflection, a typical dual pane window without a coating shouldn't make it overly difficult for folks to see thru it. It will be somewhat more reflective than a single pane, but up where I live it gets very cold and anything built today has at least dual pane glass, but it is still easy to see what is behind the windows.

Having a heat source directly affecting the windows would be a very good idea. The reasons windows fog in the winter is because the glass is too cold and the air to warm...this causes condensation on the glass.

By directing warm air on the glass, you might be able to keep the windows warm enough to avoid condensation.

Good luck!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: