window sill?


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Old 03-22-06, 01:03 AM
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window sill?

I'm getting quotes for new vinal windows. The existing windows are wood with wood sills. Will I be able to get new windows installed and remove this wood sill. Will this sill replacemnet be costly?
 
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Old 03-22-06, 05:40 AM
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Vinyl replacement windows go inside the old frame (inside the old jamb, on top of the sloped sill). Your interior trim would remain the same (casing, stool or "window sill" and interior stops).

Not sure if you are talking about the stool (window sill) or the sloped sill. Often, the sloped sill will get a little rotton and will need to be replaced before the new replacement windows are installed. This is not difficult if you are experienced... we charge about $50 per sill to replace a sloped sill. If you are talking about the stool (window sill) I'm not sure why you would want to remove it.

You can also get vinyl windows with a nailing fin, but this is more costly, because the old jamb must be removed, the old interior trim must be removed, the rough opening usually needs to be resized, then new interior trim must be prepped and installed, and the exterior surfaces must be trimmed and clad. There is a tremendous difference in time and labor when installing in this way. That's why replacement windows are so popular- they make it relatively quick and easy to replace a window.
 
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Old 03-23-06, 12:30 AM
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thanks for the help. i was talking about removing the outside sloped sill. It is not rotten but will not look as good as a clean squared window.
 
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Old 03-23-06, 05:49 AM
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I see. The exterior sloped sill must stay put when installing replacement windows that go inside the old jamb. The sloped sill actually helps flash the bottom of the opening by acting as a drip edge of sorts, so that rainwater drips off the front of the sill and past your siding, rather than being forced to run down the siding, be blown back under the sill by the wind, or sit on a flat surface, as you would have if you surrounded the window on 4 sides with a flat tim board. Water that sits on flat surfaces will cause rot because it is sucked back into the cracks between mouldings.

As mentioned, if you are installing a window that has a nailing fin, then it's likely that the old frame of the window will be entirely removed, sill and all. In that case, your nailing fin provides the flashing, and exterior trim is caulked to the window on all 4 sides, which will hopefully keep out water. Many people prefer to keep the look of the sloped sill when they trim the exterior, and actually install a fake sill on the bottom, just for looks. Additionally, many people feel that if you install the siding right up to a window that has a nailing fin, it makes the window look anemic because we are used to seeing wide trim around windows. Others feel it gives the window a "clean" appearance. It's all personal preference.
 
 

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