Adding glass to a 3-panel


  #1  
Old 05-23-06, 07:50 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,217
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Adding glass to a 3-panel

I want to replace the top wood panel on a door with glass, tempered I suppose.

The door is 3-panel (one short full-width panel on top, 19Wx17H, two on the bottom, 7Wx40H). The rails, stiles and muntins all are routed at an angle so there's a simple convex and concave decorative detail around the perimeter of the panel.

I am thinking I'll have to cut the panel to remove it and then saw or route out the decorative section around the perimeter on one side of the door to mount the glass. Then glue or staple a similar trim detail piece in place over the glass and stain to match.

Is there an easier way? Will this work? Is it common for a carpenter or glazier to do this sort of thing? What is the thickness of common glass vs. tempered? Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 05-26-06, 03:54 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Sounds like you have the technique down pretty good. I had to read it several times to make sure. Now, depending on what type door you are talking about -- exterior/interior; steel/solid wood/hollow core; standard thickness or thinner. Of course a single pane of glass gives minimal insulation value,an I would recommend a thermopane glazing, and cutting down on the profile of the molding pieces. Give me more info, and I'll see what we can do.
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-06, 04:16 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,217
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Thanks for your response Larry. Here are some more answers.

Originally Posted by chandler
exterior/interior; steel/solid wood/hollow core; standard thickness or thinner.
Interior
Solid wood, oak and pine, milled around 1926
About 1-5/16" thick

Originally Posted by chandler
Of course a single pane of glass gives minimal insulation value,an I would recommend a thermopane glazing, and cutting down on the profile of the molding pieces.
These are interior doors. I've put standard hardware store glass in storm windows but I want to use safer stuff in the doors.
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-06, 07:15 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Wellllll, not seeing the door, here's what I'd do. Cut the opening you want, clean it up, purchase and install one side of the scotia molding on one side, leaving it 1/8" off center. Have a glass shop cut the appropriate size 1/4" glass (tempered is best), install it against the molding with a bed of silicone for cushioning, another bead on the new side, and install the opposite side scotia molding. I'd use 3/4" 16 gauge or narrower nails to install the molding so it won't split. Like I said earlier, I think you have the theory down pretty good, so it is just a matter of jumping in the pool!! Good luck.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: