replacing the blind stop on a window


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Old 06-24-06, 08:01 AM
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Post replacing the blind stop on a window

After being quoted a price of $600 per window for two vinyl replacement double hung windows (29x60, original are 1928 vintage) and a refusal by another window expert to even give me a bid on replacing only two windows, I have decided to do it myself. When inspecting one window, I noticed the blind stop is rotted away at the bottom. It also looks as though when storm windows were installed, a strip of wood was attached to the blind stop extending it (this is also rotted away). I am guessing this was done to avoid replacing the original blind stop. There does not appear to be any rot in the sill.

My questions are 1) Is it difficult to replace the blind stop? Can I cut away the bottom 12 to 15 inches and replace that or replace the whole stop? I am fairly handy but have usually shied away from projects I have not seen done or done myself in the past. 2) I assume, which is always dangerous, that if I replace the original stop, I will not need the extension? The storm windows would not be re-installed. 3) Given the need to take down the storm window prior to installing the replacement window & the need to disassemble the entire window if I replace the entire blind stop, would I be better off continue looking for a contractor or someone with a bit more experience with windows. My fear being that I take out he window and the scope of the job is more than I can handle. 4) Exclusive of window cost, what is a reasonable cost (labor) to install a replacement window. I should add, the estimate I received for $600 per window was given by a sales rep, not an installer, and the damage I later saw would probably drive up the price.

Any help on this would be appreciated. I would also recommend that anyone considering replacement windows, if getting quotes from an contractor, get them to break out the window and labor cost to install. I failed to do this and it leaves me with a lot of questions. Thanks in advance for any help..Tom
 
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Old 06-24-06, 10:32 AM
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Hi Tom,

Generally, old wooden double-hung windows have 2 types of blind stops.

1). a 3/4 x 1/2 stop that is just nailed on.

You usually see these on very old houses, where the stop was nailed onto the side of the jamb.

2). a 1 1/2 x 3/4 stop that is nailed onto the face of the jamb and is partially concealed behind the face trim.

This is more commonly what you would find on houses, and replacement usually includes removing the face trim, removing the old stop (which is nailed onto the face of the jamb), replacing the entire stop (not just part of it), and then either reinstalling the face trim if it's in good shape, or replacing it as well.

Replacing the stop isn't a big deal, and I'm sure you would be able to do it. The only problem might be that your current stops might be closer to 7/8 wide, whereas today's lumber is 3/4. If that's the case, you can sometimes get cedar or rough sawn lumber that is closer to 7/8, or perhaps rip your own stock down to size on a table saw so that it matches up to the stop that is not being replaced.
 
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Old 06-24-06, 09:06 PM
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Thank you XSleeper for your input. I do have a table saw and can rip the blind stop to the proper size if needed. I must admit that I had to look in My Reader's Digest Do-It-Yourself Manual to figure out what you meant by the face of the jamb. (It actually has a pretty good diagram of window parts). Am I correct in assuming that the face is the part of the jamb facing the outside of the house? If this is correct, the end of the jamb facing outside will be covered by the blind stop (your #2 scenario). I had originally thought I could remove the blind stop and replace it from inside the house, nailing it to the side of the jamb (your scenario #1). But his may not be the case

The house was sided with steel siding years ago and the windows all have a steel (?) frame. Now I have to go back and see what access I have to the window parts from the outside of the house. I think I might be making this more difficult than it really is but getting this up-front knowledge is much preferred to taking out the window and then being surprised. Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-25-06, 06:16 AM
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You are right about the stop being nailed to the exterior end of the jamb. And if your window trim has been clad (with aluminum trim coil), that kind of complicates things. You would have to remove the cladding in order to replace the rotton wood.

Since this is the case, you might want to go back to your original plan, and just cut out the part of the stop that is rotton and not make this a bigger production than necessary. You might be able to cut it off with a handsaw or chisel it off. If the wood behind it is also rotton, you could cut off more stop than needed, fill the rotton area with PL200 adhesive or similar and then set the new stop in place (using method one, above, since you wouldn't be taking off the face trim) nailing it to what is left of the original stop.

You'd then want to have some "stop covers" made for your blind stops so that they would also be clad like the rest of the window trim. When you tear the window out to replace it, you would put on these stop covers so that you don't have any exposed wood after the window is installed.
 
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Old 06-25-06, 07:12 AM
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XSleeper you were right about the window frames being clad in aluminum. Well, the sill is and the fascia board between the two windows (I will actually being doing two windows side by side). I need to remove the storm window on the damaged window to see what is behind it. The storm abuts the steel frame (there is no face trim) and screwed into the blind stop so the stop should be very accessible after removing the storm window. At least it appears that way from looking at the window from the inside. If I am correct, I think I can replace the blind stop from out side the house without removing the sashes. Then when I remove the sashes to install the replacement window all I need to do is add the “stop covers”. This project is getting more doable all the time. I wish I could give you a time frame for progress but I am also repairing the inside of the room and not sure when I will get to the windows. Thanks for your help.
 
 

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