Basement Window Question

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-18-07, 12:10 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Omaha
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Basement Window Question

My parents are currently remodeling their basement and we would like to replace the small window down there. the window is approximately 18x32. there is about 2 inches of concrete that has been placed on both the interior and exterior sides of this window. the window has a steal frame and then just latches in the frame. when you unlatch the window the entire thing comes out and leaves an opening to the outside. not very safe and not energy efficient. we would like to open up the area and put in a 20x32 window, however we need to remove the concrete that has been put in. Any suggestions on how to remove the concrete? we have tried to use a concrete chisle and remove it that way but it is going to take forever. Any faster remidies that could remove the concrete faster without breaking the cinder blocks?

Any help or suggestions are appreciated! thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-18-07, 04:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If it is a block foundation, a few good whacks with hammer/chisel and most of it will fall out. But you need to measure carefully and order/have the new windows on hand before any demo. Or have a piece of plywood to cover the openeing. You can order double-insulated, vinyl basement windows to the 1/4", usually about $100-125, from most lumber yards. I avoid big box stores. I usually use Tapcon screws into the foundation block on the sides. Then foam(non-expanding) in all air spaces. if this is a finished basement, you can trim the foam when dry, and paint.
 
  #3  
Old 01-19-07, 10:52 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Omaha
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
RE:Basement Window Question

The basement is all cinder block however the area that we are trying to remove isn't. we don't want to break any of the blocks we just want to remove the area of cement that was put on top of the blocks and has the metal framing in it. we have tried a few good blows with a 5 lb hammer and we didn't accomplish much.

Last night we purchased a diamond wheel for my dremel and we started to cut it out. i am thinking this is going to be the easiest and safest way to do it without having to chance breaking any of the blocks around it.

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 01-19-07, 05:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Most of the the time, a hammer(maul)/chisel is all I need. Once you get it started, it often loosens and comes off easily, but it sounds like you are on the right track.
 
  #5  
Old 01-19-07, 05:16 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,463
Received 241 Votes on 222 Posts
Gee, if I would have noticed that you were in Omaha I could have dropped by to have a look, since I've been working there lately! What you need is a rotary hammer that has a chisel attachment. Generally, I'll pry the iron on top down from the sill plate, then cut it in half with a reciprocating saw. You can then fold the top down and usually the top left and right sides will start to wiggle, and you can pry them to the center of the window. With more effort they usually will break off, leaving the bottom portion of iron remaining in the cement. You can take a grinder and grind underneath this to loosen it, or just beat it and it will usually come out.

During this process, the concrete on bottom will often start to come loose. If it doesn't that's where the rotary hammer comes in. (I use a 1 1/8" Bosch 11236VS) Usually the angled cement will pop off in large sections, but if the mortar is really good, you'll have to chip it off.

Menards has cheap segmented diamond rim cement blades for a 4 1/2" grinder... they are great for smoothing out rough cement, and grinding. If you need them, they're nice to have.
 
  #6  
Old 01-24-07, 10:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Omaha
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thumbs up

Thanks for all your suggestions guys. we officially finished demoing the interior portion of the window a few nights ago. once we got it started with the diamond wheel and got a good sized area broke out the other came out fairly easy with a 5 lb hammer and a chisel. we still have the metal frame in and the window to keep out the cold air. we need to ge the replacement window ordered before we completely break it out.

Thanks again !!
 
  #7  
Old 01-24-07, 10:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Omaha
Posts: 7
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question

Another question.

Once we completely remove the window there are going to be the big holes in the cinder blocks were we busted out the concrete at....how would you guys suggest covering that?

should we use a quick dry concrete and just spread it over the top to kinda seal it in and make it smooth? or should we use a 1x8 and use construction adhesive and try to grind the blocks smooth and then lay the 1x8 on top to make it smooth?....any ideas?
 
  #8  
Old 01-24-07, 06:26 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,463
Received 241 Votes on 222 Posts
I'd suggest that you order the custom sized window 1/4" narrower and 1 1/2" shorter than the opening. So roughly 32 x 14 1/2".

When you are ready to install, stuff some insulation down the hollow areas of your block, leaving about 2 or 3" of the hole showing. Lay a couple short pieces of 2x2 at the corners of the opening. The window will set on top of these temporary 2x2 shims to hold it up. Set the window in place, installing a couple screws through the top of the window to hold it up. Plumb the window and put 2 screws through each side if you can. Then remove the temporary 2x2 blocks.

Now you'll need to you'll make a sloped cement cap, similar to what was there before. I'd use mortar mix, not cement mix. It seems to bond better and smooths out nicer.

After the cement has cured (don't pour cement until threat of frost at night has passed, unless you're planning on covering it up, leaving the window open, etc. to keep the cement from freezing for 3-5 days) you will then want to caulk the edges of the window with a good quality polyurethane caulking such as Vulkum (Lowe's) or NP1.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: