wooden window frame


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Old 03-21-07, 08:02 PM
J
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wooden window frame

I'm building a wooden window frame for a double hung window. Everything is under control except I don't know the correct way to attach the sill to the side jams. I found some old cutaway drawings but not a word on how it's actually done. If anyone knows how this should be done I'd appreciate your advice.

Jan
 
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Old 03-22-07, 02:02 AM
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Jan: The sill should be installed at an angle tilting downward to the outside and nailed from the sides of the jambs. They are usually let into a dado.
 
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Old 03-22-07, 04:22 PM
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Just to add to Chandler's post, the dado is usually 3/8 deep on each side. So, for example, if your window is going to be 28" wide, you'd cut the interior portion of the sill 28 3/4" to fit into the jamb dado, while leaving the outside portion of the sill long (for the sill horns on each side).
 
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Old 03-22-07, 10:58 PM
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Guys,

Thanks for the tips but I'm still confused about how I'm supposed to cut a dado into a sill thats going to hang 15 degrees below horizontal. Or am I supposed to route the side jams to fit the profile of the sill?

Jan
 
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Old 03-23-07, 03:53 PM
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Yeah, when Chandler said the sill is usually "let into" a dado, he meant a dado in the jamb. The jambs are cut long, then an angled dado is cut in the jamb, about 3/8" deep. The sill fits into the dado, then the jamb is nailed or screwed onto the sill through the sides. The horns of the sill continue past the jamb on the left and right. You usually want to make the jamb exactly what your wall thickness will be. That way the sill horns and any brickmould you apply will act like a nailing fin to hold the entire thing at the right level once you go to install it.
 
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Old 03-23-07, 05:53 PM
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Guys,

I finally got smart and went to the local salvage yard and looked at a bunch of frames. The local technique was to cut the dados in the sill and toe nail the side jambs into the sill. The cutaway sketch I was trying to work from actually showed that but a single side view didn't give me enough information. Seeing some examples gave me enough to work with. I figured out how to cut the dados in the sill and the thing's assembled. Next time I think I'll use the approach you guys suggested. It sounds easier and stronger.

Thanks for your help.

Jan
 
 

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