Window repair


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Old 04-21-07, 09:39 AM
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Window repair

I had a window get broken and I was wondering how to repair the window "slat". A shingle come through and broke the horizontal slat. It only broke it into two pieces which I have both. I was wondering if this is something that I can glue back together and slide back in place or should I try and find a tradesman or woodworker to repair. Here is a link to some of the pictures of the window.

http://s157.photobucket.com/albums/t63/newhomeowner05/
 
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Old 04-21-07, 10:37 AM
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It looks like you have 3 problems: 1) broken storm window glass 2) two broken panes of glass in your wood sash 3) a broken mullion. The storm window glass should be no problem to replace. The wood mullion and the 2 pieces of glass could be replaced but would take some doing. The sash must be removed in order to make the repair. This might be a job for the local glass shop.
 
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Old 04-21-07, 10:56 AM
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I don't understand why I would have to take the window out to install that piece. There are notches for where the wood piece goes into. Are they secured some other way?
 
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Old 04-21-07, 11:51 AM
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Johnam is referring to the need to remove the upper window sash in order to replace the glass, not to glue the divided lite mullions.

Actually, I'd recommend that you remove the storm window. That way you could leave the upper double hung sash in place, and glaze it in place. You'd obviously first have to glue the mullions in place and perhaps tack them with a brad nailer since the mortise on the ends has no doubt been broken. The glue would have to set up and the repair would have to be strong, because when you glaze the new panes of glass, you have to push on that wood mullion as you use a putty knife to fill the glazing. I suppose maybe the glazing that comes in a caulking tube would be safe to use and would mean less "pushing" on the repaired mullion, but the final result is not usually as perfect.

Then once you have replaced the glass in the storm window, put it back on. It's just that the storm window frame is in the way of fixing that upper sash because the repair has to be done from the exterior side of the window.
 
 

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