How to prevent forced entry?

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Old 07-28-07, 02:12 AM
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How to prevent forced entry?

How easily can doors be broken into?

I understand doors can be kicked in, or the locks can be picked, what are some ways to prevent this?

How well does a deadbolt lock keep the door from being kicked in?

Can burglars break through windows and use them as entry points? Is this common? Any way to prevent this?
 
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Old 07-28-07, 04:57 AM
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Rule number 1. You can't stop forced entry, only slow it down. If someone wants to get in badly enough, they can do it. Slowing them down with a good dead bolt (one with a case hardened center roller in the bolt) is good. If a door is next to a window or sidelight, all bets are off. If you decide to use a double cylinder bolt, where will you store the key necessary for opening the door in an emergency? To me, using a double cylinder makes you a prisoner in your own home and can be a hazard with kids, etc, not being able to unlock the door to exit in case of a fire.
It is a topic for another forum, here, but a good Mossberg 500A with pistol grip, in 12 gauge, loaded and stored out of sight and reach of children, but accessible is an excellent way to prevent forced entry. A little messy, but effective.
If you worry enough about this, it would be good to bring in a security pro and let them walk through your environment and advise you as to the changes needed to help reduce such entry. Then we can help with the modifications.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 07:11 AM
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Police will tell you that locks only keep out honest people. Work on things like strengthening the jamb next to the door so that kicking it in is less effective. I don't worry too much about locks being picked - that's just not something burglars do, as it takes too long.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 07:22 AM
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Newer entry doors have a heavy guage sheetmetal plate on the back side of the door jamb. When the deadbolt goes through the hole in the jamb, it is thus locking through the steel, not just some wood. Long screws through the strike plate also go through holes in this security plate, helping make the door a little more secure. It helps prevent the door from being kicked in easily. Like Chandler mentioned, though, if someone wants in, they will get in- breaking a window for instance.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 11:32 AM
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A window is faster than a door, and you'd be surprised how easy some windows are to get into (especially vinyl ones).

It's also a moot point if you use a cheap, weak door.

I've seen door locks that use full length steel PLATES that extend from the edge of the door into the full length steel door jamb. That type of door is certainly secure (and expensive), unless you have the hurricane impact windows, breaking a window and crawling through it is easy.

For door locks themselves, unless you use a high security lock, a bump key (readily available on the 'net) can open most locks within a few seconds and leaves virtually no trace of forced entry (can you say, insurance denied?).
 
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Old 07-28-07, 04:20 PM
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Just looked up what a bump key is and wow I am shocked... They need a new way to lock doors that is unacceptable.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 06:01 PM
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OK, I'm just a dumb carpenter, and I am just hearing about these bump keys. I googled it and found out how to make one in a few minutes. I still haven't caught my breath, yet. Made one and still can't believe it. Is nothing sacred? They say there are only a few manufacturers whose locks can't be bumped, and they run $150 each. Definitely Mossberg.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 08:23 PM
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Yeah I believe it... they had news reports on it, and lots of videos showing how on youtube...

I am thinking about ordering a set, and also getting my front door and garage door locks upgraded.

The two brands they say cant be bumped are Medeco and Schlage Primus, they say the Primus is better because it has 1 extra feature that Medeco doesnt. But I found one website saying a Medeco can be bumped its just extremely difficult.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 08:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendragon View Post
A window is faster than a door, and you'd be surprised how easy some windows are to get into (especially vinyl ones).

It's also a moot point if you use a cheap, weak door.

I've seen door locks that use full length steel PLATES that extend from the edge of the door into the full length steel door jamb. That type of door is certainly secure (and expensive), unless you have the hurricane impact windows, breaking a window and crawling through it is easy.

For door locks themselves, unless you use a high security lock, a bump key (readily available on the 'net) can open most locks within a few seconds and leaves virtually no trace of forced entry (can you say, insurance denied?).

Wow windows are really that easy to get into?

I was thinking about nailing 2x4's across a couple of my windows, not to completely board up the window, but to make it look like bars on the window similar to a jail cell. I have a couple very big windows...

I live in a rental home, Can I do something like this? I assume I can as long as I fix it all when I move out?

Would this stop a burglar from entering if they tried through that window? Thanks
 
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Old 07-28-07, 09:50 PM
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I've opened vinyl windows for customers by simply pushing in and up where they latch as an example of why they do NOT want those windows.

I would think anything that mounted the 2x4's solidly enough is going to leave a mark when you take them down. Unless you've got gold bars on display in front of your windows, I wouldn't go to that extreme.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 07:26 AM
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Guys, you can install a $5000 safe door on the front of your house. All someone needs is a hammer to break a window.....
 
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Old 07-29-07, 08:17 AM
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Here are some observations based on burglaries I've seen here in Chicago.

Residential burglars are not the slick masters of thievery you see on TV. The average residential burglar is most often a dope addict out to steal something of value to convert easily to cash. They're far more bold than they are smart. They like privacy so it's extremely rare to find a burglar who will enter a residence knowing someone is there. Even a dumb burglar knows that if they risk contact with a home owner which results in a physical confrontation a burglary then becomes a robbery which means more jail time if caught. Burglars aren't looking for a fight, they're looking for your valuables. 99% of residential burglaries occur during daytime hours when home owners are away at work, shopping, etc. The exception would be garage burglaries which can occur as easily at night as in the day.

Burglars also like to work fast. If it takes longer for a burglar to finesse a lock with picks or bump keys then they'll prefer to force entry. They'll be in and out of a home in minutes and aren't too concerned with making some noise going through a door if they think no one is around. Doors are often kicked in or pried open, either way resulting in the door frame splintering and giving way to allow entry. Even if a neighbor should hear the ruckus the burglar plans to be gone before anyone can do anything about it. For burglars entering through doors a steel or reinforced door frame is a good deterrent.

Burglars looking to enter through windows are first looking for windows that are left unlocked, windows left open for ventilation, or window mounted fans or air conditioning units. If not blocked, a window fan or A/C can easily be pushed in or pulled out of the window allowing access. Again, finesse is not in the average burglar's plans. If they're going in through a window that's secure they're going to use force, if necessary, to shatter the window, reach in and open the latch or remove blocks, and climb in.

Alarm systems are not very effective for a burglar planning to work fast. They're certainly not as effective as alarm companies would like you to believe. Even when tripped burglars know they have at least a few minutes before anyone is likely to show up to check it out. Ironically, having a "This House is Protected by **** " alarm company sign on your lawn or window advertises to burglars that you might have something of more value than usual that you are protecting and draw their attention.

In my opinion, the best deterrent for daytime burglaries is a big dog. Burglars do not like dogs eager to protect their territory. If a burglar first checks out your home by either ringing the doorbell or otherwise nosing around and hears barking it's a virtual guarantee they'll be off to find an easier target. My German Shepherd has free run of my home, and because of that my expectation is that I will never be returning home from work to find it burglarized. If you don't have a dog you can still post "Beware of Dog" signs on your gates or windows. That in itself might be enough to give a burglar second thoughts about the possibility of dealing with a set of sharp fangs.

The best deterrent for nighttime burglaries is lighting. A burglar working in the dark is a happy burglar. Flood lights, motion sensor lights, porch lights.....any lighting is good.

Any obstacle you can put up is going to increase the odds in your favor that a burglar will be steered away in the direction of an easier target. That's the best you can hope for. If someone entering your home while you are there is your main concern, however, that's an extremely rare occurrence.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendragon View Post
I've opened vinyl windows for customers by simply pushing in and up where they latch as an example of why they do NOT want those windows.

I would think anything that mounted the 2x4's solidly enough is going to leave a mark when you take them down. Unless you've got gold bars on display in front of your windows, I wouldn't go to that extreme.
What do you mean you can open a vinyl window simply by pushing in and up?

My vinyl windows are double locked, I don't see how pushing in and up from the outside would open them? The lock is a rotating thing, hard to explain.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 01:47 PM
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I have a couple window AC units but they are screwed into the window, can they still be pulled out of the window? You can't pull the window up farther either, I have hooks preventing this.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 07:04 PM
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Some window latches don't HOOK the window, they only 'interfere' to keep the window from sliding up. If they don't actually hook to something, simply pushing in will move the latch far enough away from the frame that then you just push up and viola.. open window.

The wider the window, the easier it is because there is more flex.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 07:47 PM
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Wow this really pisses me off why would they make something so insecure...

How do I find out if I have the type of window you can do this with?
 
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Old 07-29-07, 07:53 PM
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Any way to prevent this?
A twenty-four hour guard with a fully automatic weapon; a vicious dog; a level seven bullet and explosion resistant door and jamb; a three point locking system with emergency egress; bullet and explosion resistant windows.

Quit freaking out.
A burghers bar, (that's all you get), in capable hands will rip any residential door (regardless of what lock is used) open in seconds. Lock warping is not required.

Someone that really wants to gain entry may punch their own hole in the side or roof. If they can't gain entry, they may burn it down.

Figure out another place to store valuables.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 08:09 PM
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Originally Posted by kab19 View Post
Wow this really pisses me off why would they make something so insecure...
Windows are made of glass, and the only thing easier to break is a promise.

I close and lock all my first floor windows when I leave the house, but I still find it foolish; if someone wants to break into my house, I may as well leave the window open, just to spare myself the expense of replacing it, or, worse, the door frame.

No lock is stronger than the material in which it is set. Dead bolts in pine frames and locks on windows are, well, silly. In theory.

In practice, thieves are either smart or lazy enough to look for the easy target. So lock your doors and windows, but don't look for perfect security.

And I agree that the best security system [for the average home-owner] is a large dog, especially a peaceful one that doesn't bark at every leaf blowing by.
 
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Old 09-06-07, 08:17 AM
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Security window

Most would be burglers will not break a window because it would make too much noise and alert the occupants. My question would be, "How do we prevent these burglers from entering when we forget to secure our windows".

My thought is to manipulate the latches which allow the window to tilt in. Manipulate them in such a way that they can also extend outward into receptacles (holes) built into the frame of the window. This would essentially deadbolt the window into a predetermined fixed position. Unfortunately I have not found a manufacturer who produces such a product.
 
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Old 09-07-07, 06:21 AM
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There are some windows with built in 'night latches', that only let the window open about 2" for airflow, they are built in to the frame. You can also buy window locks that essentially do the same thing.
 
 

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