Installing Pre-hung door: Basic Question


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Old 08-01-07, 09:23 AM
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Installing Pre-hung door: Basic Question

Hi all,

I'm framing my basement and am ready to install a number of pre-hung doors. I think I know how to go about it, but I have one basic question.

It seems to make sense that it would be easier if I remove the door from the frame and then just plumb and nail the frame and then re-attach the door. I'm just wondering if there is any possible reason for not removing the door first.

Thank you.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 10:06 AM
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You need the door in position to square the frame to the door in the opening during installation. Otherwise, you will not know how many shims to place at various locations. You can also check the operation of the door as you go to make sure everying is progressing appropriately.

Are your doors just pre-hung or pre-hung split jambs?
 
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Old 08-01-07, 10:58 AM
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That makes sense. Thanks.

They're basic Home Depot flat jamb doors, including one 48" french door.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 02:38 PM
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One trick that sometimes speeds things up, is to do this: while the door is still closed, wedge a tapered cedar shim in all 4 corners of the door... and on double doors, insert some between the doors as well. (assuming you should have shims anyway to install the doors). What this will do is it will keep the jamb square with the door. Then set the door in place, plumb the hinge side, shim everything in place, put a nail in each corner of the jamb... then you can open the door and finish your installation. Once the doors are all hung, then you can pull the hinge pins (label the doors so as to put them back where they came from) and remove the doors.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 02:46 PM
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Ahhh, I see. I like that idea.

Thank you.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 03:07 PM
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You're welcome- glad to help!

One other thing that you might not notice, but is important, is that both sides of the door must be in the same plane. (ideally, both sides should be plumb) When the door is closed, it should contact the door stop evenly all the way around the door. As you set the door in place, you want the jamb to be flush with the drywall on both sides of the wall. But you also need to look at how the door hits on the door stop. If the door bows away from the door stop on the top or bottom (latch side) it usually means both door jambs need to be adjusted- one needs to go farther in on bottom, one needs to come farther out at the bottom. You usually want to keep the top of the jamb centered on the wall if you can help it (makes your casing miters better) and if an adjustment needs to be made for plumb, it works better to make the adjustment (in and out) on the bottom of the jamb, nearest the floor.
 
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Old 08-01-07, 03:17 PM
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I might have just checked for plumb all the way around and never caught that. I'll watch for that as well.
 
 

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