opening interior door with butterknife

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Old 10-02-07, 03:00 PM
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opening interior door with butterknife

Could anyone plz tell me if I understand this correctly? When inserting an inside door to a house, say to a bedroom, one that has a lock on the outside that takes a key, when installing the handles, isnt there a certain plate type thing that could be placed somewhere to make it so that while the door is locked, someone wont be able to just walk up to it with a butterknife and push the lock so that the door swings open!?!?! I am only asking because Im not sure and my younger sister wont stop entering my bedroom while im gone and have it locked, it's driving me nutts and rather than getting so angry as to where I hurt her cause I've had enough, I figure the more smart thing for me to do is fix it so that she just isnt able to successfully enter without permission. I just dont know what the plate thing looks like out of all the different types of plate type things that come with new handles. Can anyone explain to me what it looks like and where it goes plz, and thank you so very much
 
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Old 10-02-07, 05:19 PM
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A keyed entry lock comes with a latch that cannot be forced open with a knife, *provided* it is installed correctly. If you look at the latch (the part the goes into the strike plate when the door is closed) you will find that it should have a tiny 1/2 moon shaped piece on it which rides on the flat side of the rest of the latch. This is a security feature that prevents the latch from being forced open with a knife. When the tiny 1/2 moon piece is depressed, the rest of the latch cannot be forced in. What this means is that the strike plate has to be positioned properly in order for this feature to work. When the door closes, the main portion of the latch should click into the strike plate, while the 1/2 moon portion of the latch should NOT click into the strike plate... instead it should remain depressed against the strike plate which locks the main portion of the latch into the strike plate. If both parts of the latch go into the strike plate when the door is closed, then a knife can open the door. The strike plate would need to be moved closer to the door stop to avoid this problem.

Hopefully that makes sense... it looks confusing on paper but maybe that's because I'm not describing it very well.

With the door open, try it out. Depress the tiny 1/2 moon portion of the latch, and notice how it locks the main portion of the latch from being depressed. If you don't have the 1/2 moon portion on your latch, then maybe someone just put a new knob on an old passage latch- in that case you'd need a different latch that is made for a keyed entry.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 02:00 PM
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Responding to your answer

As silly as this may sound, you wouldnt happen to have or happen to know of any visuals or diagrams to help me better understand what it is exactly that you are trying to explain? That would be such a tremendous help.Plz and Thank You
 
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Old 10-20-07, 03:09 PM
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Door

Does the door swing in when opened or does it swing out?

If it swings in, the door stop should prevent a knife from being inserted into the latch at the striker plate from the outside.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 03:25 PM
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If this helps we are calling the plunger like thing that is able to be moved back a latch.
On one side of the latch should be a small plunger like thing that when the door is open can be pushed in, independently of the main part of the latch.

When the door is closed the striker plate on the door fram should allow the main part of the latch to enter the hole but stop the small plunger.
When this small plunger is depressed the main part of the latch should be blocked.

All you need to do to check this is first push the small plunger in and see if you are able to push in the main part of the latch.
If the main part of the latch pushes in when the small plunger is depressed the lock is defective.

If it does block the main latch then the plate on the door frame is the wrong one or not adjusted properly.
 
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Old 10-21-07, 03:55 PM
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Since a picture is worth 1000 words, maybe this will help.

This is the "strike plate". When the door is closed, the latch enters the hole in the center of the strike plate.



This is the "latch". You will notice that it has a larger half, and a smaller half that is semi-circular.



The semi-circular half of the latch is a safety feature. When it is depressed, the larger portion of the latch is locked and cannot be depressed or forced open (such as by a butter knife).



When the door is in the closed position, the semi-circular portion of the latch should be depressed against the strike plate, while the larger portion should be fully engaged inside the strike plate. The following illustration depicts the PROPER position of the latch inside the strike plate when the door is closed.



If the semi-circular portion of the latch AND the larger portion of the latch are BOTH inside the strike plate when the door is closed, then the latch COULD be forced open. The following illustration shows the IMPROPER position of the latch inside the strike plate when the door is closed.

 
 

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