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first time to do such exterior door threshold

first time to do such exterior door threshold


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Old 01-21-08, 07:14 PM
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first time to do such exterior door threshold

Question is what am I doing? I need to replace the door threshold for the back door to my house. I don't know where to start or what kind of problems I might run in to. Also any tips for a first timer for doing such a job. I know I can do it, I just want to get it right. Thanks, jch2medic
 
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Old 01-21-08, 07:20 PM
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Welcome to the DIY forums- I see this is your first post!

Just to ensure we are on the same page as we attempt to answer your question... You say you are replacing the "threshold".

Is this an aluminum threshold, about 3" wide, bevelled on each side, that has a bulb weatherstrip on it? Or is it a wooden threshold that is about 3" wide, that is bevelled on each side? Or are you referring to something completely different?

The threshold is usually referred to as the piece of wood immediately below the door when the door is closed. It is a transition piece that covers the gap between the finished flooring inside, and what is usually a sloped wooden sill on the outside.
 
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Old 01-21-08, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Welcome to the DIY forums- I see this is your first post!

Just to ensure we are on the same page as we attempt to answer your question... You say you are replacing the "threshold".

Is this an aluminum threshold, about 3" wide, bevelled on each side, that has a bulb weatherstrip on it? Or is it a wooden threshold that is about 3" wide, that is bevelled on each side? Or are you referring to something completely different?

The threshold is usually referred to as the piece of wood immediately below the door when the door is closed. It is a transition piece that covers the gap between the finished flooring inside, and what is usually a sloped wooden sill on the outside.

What I need to replace is the wood piece under the 3" aluminum. Does it just sit there or is it secured in any way? and so on....
 
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Old 01-22-08, 04:36 AM
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So you are replacing the sloped wood sill under your door. That can be pretty difficult to do on old wooden doors. The side jambs are usually nailed into the sides of that piece, so when you remove the sloped sill (by cutting a large section out of the middle with a reciprocating saw, then splitting and pulling out the side pieces that remain) it will leave the jambs hanging in midair, and they will be held in place by the trim nails through the casing on the interior and trim nails through the exterior trim on the outside.

When you remove the sill, you will probably expose the rim and floor joists, and you might be able to see right down into the basement or crawlspace. This would be a good time to install some insulation under the door. You may also need to install some solid blocking between the floor joists so that you have something better to secure the new sill to. If you carefully level these pieces and maybe even cut the correct angle of the sill on them, and raise them up a bit to compensate for a thinner sill (really old sills are usually about 1 3/4 while new wood is 1 1/2) you'll make your job a little easier.

Once you cut the new sill to fit you will use seal beneath it with sealant, slide it into place and use galvanized finish nails to secure it to the opening. Toenailing the ends of the sill through the side jambs would be a good idea too. Then your 3" aluminum threshold can go back on.

You'll probably want a reciprocating saw, table saw, and handsaw to complete this job.
 
 

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