Replacement window mounting


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Old 04-28-08, 03:15 PM
L
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Replacement window mounting

I have contacted several window installers about replacement windows and they all say they have to install them from the outside. All the DIY windows say do it from the inside. I am going to DIY and want to know if there are any advantages to either method.
 
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Old 04-29-08, 03:17 PM
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Installation from the inside only requires removal of the stop molding, which is replaced after the window is installed. If the window frame/trim is painted, it often does not even need touching up.

Installation from the outside destroys the outside stop and usually requires wraping the exterior trim. Not necessarily an undesirable thing, but may not be a needed step.
 
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Old 04-29-08, 04:36 PM
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Thanks Bill. The contractors wanted to charge me an extra $60 per window, (I have 20) to rewrap my already wrapped exterior trim. I guess an extra $1200 in profit was why they insisted to put them in from the outside.

Guess I'll be ordering my windows tomorrow !!!!
 

Last edited by logdoc_rob; 04-29-08 at 04:37 PM. Reason: Darn big fingers!!!
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Old 04-29-08, 06:16 PM
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If you have storm windows, when they are removed it will likely leave some exterior trim that is uncovered. Usually it is about 3/4" of the blind stop that is behind the storm window. If that's the case, make sure that will be getting clad.

As JustBill mentioned, rewrapping the windows is not always necessary. If you want to be sure, remove a storm window and see what it looks like. Sometimes a shoddy wrap job would NEED to be rewrapped. For instance, if the cladding does not have flaps that flash the sill behind the side pieces, you likely have a shoddy wrap job. If the cladding is in good shape, we often will simply make a "stop cover" for jobs where we install from the inside and leave the existing cladding alone.

Also, some windows do not have a removable interior stop, it is sometimes nailed behind the casing, making an exterior install the preferred method. You'd want to make sure of these things before deciding which installation method is best.

You might also consider that your contractors may have been trying to do what is in your best interests and give you a professional looking job when they are finished, not a new window surrounded by an opening that could be dirty, have screw holes in it or that is poorly wrapped, that would give anyone who looked at it a bad impression of the company that installed it. It could be that they know or foresee something you don't. And that the price they quoted of $60 per window is not "pure profit". A decent job of cladding takes some skill and care. There is time, labor, materials and overhead involved and only a small percentage of THAT is profit. Don't automatically assume they're trying to take you for a ride. They're likely professionals who are trying to do a professional looking job. They ALL say to do it from the outside, maybe there is a reason?
 
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Old 04-30-08, 09:20 AM
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While on this subject how exactly does one go about cladding the outside of the window? Are their preformed pieces you can buy or does everything have to be custom made? Also, is it possible to install the replacement window first and come back later with the cladding or does it all have to be done at the same time?
 
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Old 04-30-08, 09:45 AM
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Heres something not mentioned about an outside install. You don't have to go in the customers house! Not nearly as many issues with clean-up, damage, moving furniture for access, accusations of loss of property, etc.

Also, saw many very good installers not have to use any type of head expander (which can be kinda ugly), because they could size the replacement for a "push straight in" fit vs the "tilt in" required if there is stool on the interior.

Not a big issue if yer doing it in yer own house, but definitely a consideration for a business.
 
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Old 04-30-08, 03:30 PM
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Wrapping the outside trim is more involved than just covering the trim with aluminum. You need to start from the bottom, and each piece, as you work your way up, must overlap so as not to allow rain/water in at the joints. Joints are always caulked, but a proper job does not rely on the caulk to waterproof what is underneath.
 
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Old 04-30-08, 07:42 PM
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Is this trim available in a pre-formed fashion or must all pieces be custom made for each window?
 
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Old 04-30-08, 08:09 PM
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its custom made.
 
 

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