4.5 inch frame for a 3.625 inch rough frame!

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Old 05-29-08, 09:31 AM
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4.5 inch frame for a 3.625 inch rough frame!

I ordered over $1000 worth of 6 panel doors last month and have spent the last several weeks staining and poly'ing them to get them ready to install.. But the frames are the wrong size!!

UHG!!

What do I do?? The frames are a veneer so I can't cut them to size (Can I?). Is a 1/2 inch on each side really noticeable with the casing?
 
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Old 05-29-08, 09:33 AM
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Babel
Yes the 1/2" would be noticable, as in impossible to case out...but do you have your drywall up yet? What size are your framing members in the wall?
 
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Old 05-29-08, 10:09 AM
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Yeah.. drywall is already up. We were just replacing the doors/frames in our house. The wall studs are only 2x3s instead of 2x4s
 
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Old 05-29-08, 10:18 AM
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The wall thickness should have been an obvious consideration when ordering the doors since you have a non-standard wall thickness. At this point, if you still want to use the jambs, the best thing to do would be to cut them down on a table saw (cutting off material from the latch side, not the hinge side). I would guess the best thing to do would be to cut them down to 3 3/8" wide (assuming your wall is 3 9/16 thick) then since you mentioned the jambs are veneer, glue and brad nail a solid piece of wood onto the cut edge. Screen moulding would be a good choice since it's usually roughly 3/16 x 11/16 and already has a rounded edge.
 
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Old 05-31-08, 05:49 PM
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Hi,
Just an idea. The jamb is 7/8 bigger that the wall. Take a 1x4 and put it on the perimeter of the wall and shim it for the correct width. The jamb will now flush up on the wall on one side and on the other it will flush up with the 1x4. You now can now install the casing.
 
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Old 05-31-08, 05:58 PM
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Hi I'm having a hard time typing so to coninue, with the 1x4 is to make it look planned. you will only be limited by your imagination Maybe stained wood or 1x6 with a router design. or fancy moulding. I know you can make it work and look goog.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 05-31-08, 09:10 PM
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I read the post & responses. Same general advice as Xsleeper but a different method. Two conditions (1) the stops must be applied stops, or you must be willing to change them if they are rabbeted. (2) You must be capable of simple mill work (table saw, router, & layout).

With some work the jambs can be saved. Calc the jamb width needed. Basically: remove the excess stock from the center of the jamb (staying clear of hinge and strike preps). Mill a rabbet on each half, to one-half of the jamb thickness, creating overlapping “tabs”. Slip opposing pieces together. Use the applied stop to cover the joint. (You have just created a split jamb in the field).
 
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Old 05-31-08, 09:19 PM
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Good idea, 2000... i like it. Besides the rabbet bit, a glue joint router bit would also work well, provided the door stop is removeable and will cover the seam, as you said.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 11:04 PM
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Excellent idea, 2000, it would look the best, however, for the average DIY'er probably not going to happen. Much simpler faster and only slightly less attractive would be to build out behind the casing, either 1/2" on each side or do it all on one side- faster. Only you or a professional would probably even notice.
 
 

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