"Transom" window removal

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  #1  
Old 05-30-08, 11:19 AM
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"Transom" window removal

I have full length windows in our solarium that have additional small, rectangular windows above them. I'm not sure what these smaller windows are called, but I think I heard the builder refer to them as transom windows. I have no idea who manufactured them in 1998.

Two of these small, double paned windows have "sucked" the insulation into view on the sides and one of them has developed a crack. I need to replace all three.

Does anyone know if these windows can be removed from the outside, or does all the moulding material have to be removed from the inside to replace them? The exterior fittings look like painted metal strips, but I don't know if they just pry loose, or what.
 
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Old 05-30-08, 02:41 PM
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Look again, but I believe you will need to remove screws holding an axle receiver, which is probably inlet into the stile. Once you remove one side, the transom should slip out of the other side. If you have keeper rods, then you will have to remove them, too. You may want to take a picture of your windows and post them on a site such as photobucket.com and either give us the urls or copy/paste the HTML code to your response post.
 
  #3  
Old 05-31-08, 11:15 AM
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No, there are no screws. I guess my description was misleading. There are no moving parts to these "transom" style windows.

I took some pictures.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...e/DSC01172.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...e/DSC01175.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...e/DSC01177.jpg

The first shows the interior (just molding around the window). The second show the exterior, and the third is a close up of what appears to be vinyl strips around the window.

I can't tell if those vinyl strips just pull away, but I don't want to damage anything.

Any ideas?
 

Last edited by Mooneymite; 05-31-08 at 01:30 PM.
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Old 05-31-08, 11:37 AM
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Yes, those vinyl glazing strips come off. Once they are removed, you would need to deglaze the glass on the inside, cutting the sealant (or two-faced tape) to release the glass from the frame. It might just be siliconed to the interior side of the frame. A thin flexible putty knife might be used to cut this seal. You'd lay the putty knife on the interior side of the glass, then push it between the glass and the frame. Then try to slide it sideways all the way around the perimeter of the glass. We use a deglazing tool that is shaped like a pizza cutter, so maybe bending a pizza cutter handle or a thin knife would work since you don't have the correct tool for the job.

I'm not sure what type of glazing strips you have... some will tap out with a sharp chisel if you insert the chisel into the groove and tap toward the center of the window. Judging by the picture, you would remove the side pieces first, then the top and bottom.

Sorry to see that your swiggle seal spacer is getting "swiggley". Maybe that's how it got its name. Once you get the glass out, you'll be taking it to a glass shoppe to have them make a new IGU, I assume?
 
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Old 05-31-08, 01:29 PM
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Ah, ha!

Thank you.

So, I remove the pane from the OUTSIDE! I'm glad to have this explained to me. A trim man told me I'd have to remove all the wood molding and remove it from the inside. I was having a heart attack thinking about how much I would break and have to replace doing this!

What materials/tools will I need to re-install the window? I presume I can re-seal with silicone, but what will keep the vinyl strips back on?

Any suggestion for a glass shoppe? (When a place uses shoppe instead of shop, doesn't that double the prices? )

Thanks again.
 
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Old 05-31-08, 02:21 PM
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Yes, the glass will come out from the outside. Once the new one is made, you can glaze it with silicone... just clean off the old, reapply the new. Try not to put so much on that it gushes out onto the inside... silicone makes a mess. If the IGU was glazed on the inside with two-faced tape, you might be able to ask the glass shop (shoppe was a slip up, sorry! LOL) for a small roll, I'm sure they would be glad to oblige for a price. Provided they make the IGU exactly the same size and thickness, you shouldn't have a problem with the vinyl glazing strips going right back in where they were... provided you don't break them when they come out. You'll tap them back into place with a block of wood and a rubber mallet or you can use a hammer (if you're careful).

If there were rubber setting blocks around the perimeter of the glass, save them and reuse them when you install the new IGU.
 
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Old 06-01-08, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Yes, the glass will come out from the outside. Once the new one is made, you can glaze it with silicone... just clean off the old, reapply the new. You'll tap them back into place with a block of wood and a rubber mallet or you can use a hammer (if you're careful).

If there were rubber setting blocks around the perimeter of the glass, save them and reuse them when you install the new IGU.

Okay...I'll be working on this on Monday. I'll remove one, use it to order the three windows...I presume they'll have to make them up.

I'll let you know how it goes, or what problems I encounter.

Thanks for your help.
 
  #8  
Old 06-09-08, 02:39 PM
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IGU life time???

Well, all three transom windows are repaired. Everything went just as you suggested, except that one of the transom windows (the one that was cracked) had been originally installed with window glazing instead of silicone caulk. It was a bear to remove!

I got a big surprise when the glass shop told me that all of my IGU windows would need replacing soon!!!!!!

Apparently, the desicant that absorbs moisture only lasts about 10 years, then the windows begin fogging up.

When I went home to check, sure enough, about half of the original windows in my solarium are beggining to fog up inside.

This is a rotten deal. Having to replace all the IGU's every ten years is going to be a pain and a terrific expense!
 
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