Anderson Sliding Door not sealing well...

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  #1  
Old 06-09-08, 08:17 PM
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Anderson Sliding Door not sealing well...

Hello all,
I'm new to this forum and I did a search on this topic but did not find anyone siting the same issue.

I just installed a new Anderson sliding patio door yesterday and I noticed that once I inserted the operational panel, it did not seal against the jam w/s very well (unless it was locked).
I called Anderson customer support and they told me that this is not unusual for a new sliding door. They said that we should keep it closed and locked tight as much as possible for the next 2 months so the w/s will "form" to the closed door. After this time, the door should seat well even when not locked.

Does this sound correct?

Thanks a lot in advance for any advice on this.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-10-08, 03:44 AM
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Location: Wilmington
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Assuming that the contact is even top to bottom, yes, that is correct. The vinyl seals are new and need to form to the door. If the contact is not even top to bottom, adjust the rollers at bottom/top.
 
  #3  
Old 06-10-08, 08:55 AM
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Just Bill,
Thanks a lot for the feedback. This has really been driving me crazy.

Yes the contact is even from top to bottom, although it seem like the door makes better contact to the top and bottom of the jam w/s than the center of the door. The frame is not bowed at all so I assume that the top and bottom of the jam w/s has the most breaking in to do.

Does the interlocking w/s at the operational-stationary door interface also have to conform over time?
 
  #4  
Old 06-10-08, 09:48 PM
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"Bounce back" is what i call it. The standard reply for this is (ahem) " Keep it locked and in a 8 hours or so the interlock will break in and you won't have this problem". Usually this works. However, I have seen this problem persist for more than 8 hours and even more than a couple weeks. The procedure to remedy this problem, as told to me by the regional service rep from Andersen is to remove the operating panel and if you look at your interlock weatherstrip you should notice a bulb where one side of the interlock pushes into the other. This bulb is what causes the "bounce back". If you cut right down the center of the bulb with a utility knife (make sure it's sharp) it will release the pressure that the bulb is creating, stopping the bounce back.

I know sounds pretty midevil. Cutting into your brand new door weatherstrip? EEEEK! I don't think you'll get anyone at Andersen to admit to this procedure, but it works.


By the way, if you decide to go with this approach, I take no responsibility for your newly "damaged" door.
 
  #5  
Old 06-11-08, 10:47 AM
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grob62,

"Bounce back" is exactly the term that their product specialist used when I called.

The gap at the operating panel/locking jam is so large that I expect an adjustment like you're suggesting will be required.

When you say "bulb" do you mean on the operating panel interlocking w/s or the stationary panel interlocking w/s?
Or maybe both?

This really seems like a cludge, but what ever it takes. I'm not afraid to "damage" something if it makes it work better.

I installed an Anderson Frenchwood slider several years (~9 years) ago, and I don't recall ever having this problem.

I bet Anderson "improved" something in the design that makes the overall system unmanufacturable. This won't be the first time I've encountered this sort of thing with other vendors.

Thanks a bunch.
 
  #6  
Old 06-13-08, 04:19 AM
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grob62,

My door is now fixed (damaged). This really worked like a charm. Thank you so much for the idea. This w/s design is pretty lame. About 10 years ago, I installed an Anderson Frenchwood slider and it had the same interlocking w/s but I didn't have this problem. The design must have been better.

I'm pretty dissapointed in Anderson at this point. I am definitely going to let them know about my discomfort.

Overall, I would say the door is nice and solid and looks good, too. It's a real shame that the flaw in the interlocking w/s design exists.

I actually did an experiment first, before cutting the bulb. I removed the sliding door panel and took of the w/s from it. Then I reinstalled the sliding panel (without it's interlocking w/s). In this state, the door closed tightly against the locking jam, like it should. Needless to say, I immediately put a fresh blade in my utility knife and carefully slashed away.

This step really should be included in the installation instructions.

I owe you a beer (or something).

Best Regards

Originally Posted by grob62 View Post
"Bounce back" is what i call it. The standard reply for this is (ahem) " Keep it locked and in a 8 hours or so the interlock will break in and you won't have this problem". Usually this works. However, I have seen this problem persist for more than 8 hours and even more than a couple weeks. The procedure to remedy this problem, as told to me by the regional service rep from Andersen is to remove the operating panel and if you look at your interlock weatherstrip you should notice a bulb where one side of the interlock pushes into the other. This bulb is what causes the "bounce back". If you cut right down the center of the bulb with a utility knife (make sure it's sharp) it will release the pressure that the bulb is creating, stopping the bounce back.

I know sounds pretty midevil. Cutting into your brand new door weatherstrip? EEEEK! I don't think you'll get anyone at Andersen to admit to this procedure, but it works.


By the way, if you decide to go with this approach, I take no responsibility for your newly "damaged" door.
 
  #7  
Old 12-24-14, 01:19 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,126
I bought an Andersen custom, over size (not typical 6'x8') from Renewal by Andersen. They do the installs, take the detailed measurements for fabrication and take over a dozen or so digital photos for the installer to see in advance. This was for a slab on grade walk-out installation.

The total removal, loading for disposal and installation took 2-1/2 hours. When the door was installed, the installer showed how it should be very tight and difficult to lock and the will settle back in after a week or two and how to set it tighter. No need to adjust after "settling in" since they came to do it about a month later.

With a bad back and trying to move a panel, it made me happy to have a good installation and deal with the problems. - A north facing slider in MN (well below 0F in the winter) and it seals and locks like a good freezer door. It moves and slides with little effort and has nice security system that allows the door to be left open about 6", but still secure. I had second one installed adjacent to my deck above and the even used pan flashing there because the wall was stick-framed and installation/flashing is very critical. The installer is Certified by an independent educator for the American Association of Manufacturers. - I had to took the same class since I do investigations for mold and water for legal purposes and credibility/experience is critical.

The Renewals are probably not like the typical Andersen windows from a big box store since they sell an installed door and not just a glorified "hole in a wall". - Just a different way to do it.

Dick
 
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