Prehung door wider than opening


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Old 07-22-08, 09:37 AM
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Prehung door wider than opening

Hi guys,

Just signed up for the forum because I can surely use the help. My wife and I bought all new prehung doors for the hallway. When I went to install the new door I noticed that it about a 1/2 inch wider than the opening. Apparently the previous owner used 3/8" sheetrock and now the opening is too small.

I was thinking I should leave the hallway side flush with the wall so the trim looks good but how do I hide or fix the nearly 1/2" that will be in sticking inside the room??

thanks for your help!
Kevin
 
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Old 07-22-08, 11:28 AM
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Sounds like you are installing a prehung door and the depth of the framing + sheetrock is narrower than the jamb. If this is the case, you can plane down the interior jamb piece so the casing will sit flush on both sides.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 11:37 AM
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Hey,

Do I plane it down before installing the door on some saw horses or after installing the door?

Thank you,
Kevin
 
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Old 07-22-08, 11:54 AM
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I'd temporarily install it, just to get the right depth, then scribe/mark it, and do it on the horses. Better a little high, than too low. You could even use a trim saw instead of a plane (man, that would be a lot of shavings). You can always make small adjustments after it's back in the hole.

Watch out for any fasteners in the corners.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 12:12 PM
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Hey Gunguy,

Sounds like a good idea to tack it up, mark it and then take it down to cut. I can probably cut it with a jigsaw.

Thank you both for your help!
Kevin
 
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Old 07-22-08, 12:36 PM
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Ack!!! Jigsaw will prob leave a very convoluted cut unless you use a guide. A good guide! Better to use a cordless or trim saw. Or a circular saw with a fine blade. Stay outside the line and clean it up after install.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 01:31 PM
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You're right and I am terrible with the jigsaw. No way I could cut a straight line. Never heard of a trim saw before. Got to check them out. I love buying new tools!

Thanks,
Kevin
 
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Old 07-22-08, 05:02 PM
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What I'd do is measure the wall thickness at all 4 corners of the rough opening. Let's say it is 4 1/8 in most places and 4" in one corner. I'd use 4 1/16" as the measurement I want. I prefer the door jamb to be recessed a little behind the drywall rather than stick out a little too far.

If you have a table saw, you can disassemble the door from the hinges and maybe have a helper assist you as you run the jamb through the table saw. Tacking a spacer onto the bottom legs of the jamb will help you keep it together as you move it around. If it's easier to knock the jamb apart, you can do that too, then just put it back together. On all 3 sides, I'd cut the excess off the side of the jamb that is opposite the side that the latch, strike plate and hinges will be on, not off the same side that latch, strike plate and hinges will be on. If you have veneered jambs and you plan on staining the trim, you might want to apply some iron on edging to cover up the cut edge. Or, cut 1/4" more off than needed, and plan on applying a 1/4" strip of solid wood onto the cut edge. Or, if it's going to be painted, maybe you don't have to worry about the cut edge showing.

If you have to cut the door jambs by hand, clamping a "straight" board onto the jamb as a guide is a must. You want the teeth of the blade to come up through the good side of the jamb, so you'd be running the saw across the OUTSIDE of the jamb. Using a cordless trim saw that is "light" is a good suggestion, just because they are so light and easy to handle. Plus if you don't have one, the wife might go for the idea if you "need it".
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 06-27-20 at 07:55 PM.
 

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