front window replacement


  #1  
Old 08-28-08, 10:30 AM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,682
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
front window replacement

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/IMG_0925.jpg

The link above shows a photo of the front window I would like to replace entirely with a new vinyl one (but not the bay window style, just a regular flat window). My initial question about this project is about taking the correct measurements so I will be sure to order the right size. I want to replace this entire three-section window with one window.

From what point(s) do I measure? Do I need to go to the trouble of taking off the window trim, etc. just to be able to take the measurements? Any advice/comments appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 08-28-08, 10:59 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
Yes, you need to know the rough opening. You need that to be able to find a window that will fit and meets your desires. I'd take off the interior trim to be able to measure accurately. If you take off the exterior, the framing will still be covered by the nailing flange. Looks like a pretty simple job though.

You might not be able to get a single window unless you go with a picture window..but a combo unit (movable-fixed-movable) in many styles...slider, casement, double hung, should be easy. Hopefully they didn't have a weird window on hand and then framed to fit.

The problem I see is that it looks like they did some strange stuff there. Thats a garden window between 2 casements, with some sort of wood frame for support. Maybe there was originally a picture window in the middle. That would be a very common configuration.

Go easy when taking it apart, you can donate the old windows to Habitat and get a charity donation credit on your taxes.
 
  #3  
Old 08-28-08, 11:37 AM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,682
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Gunguy45
Yes, you need to know the rough opening. I'd take off the interior trim to be able to measure accurately.


Okay, the above link is to a photo I just took after taking off one piece of the exterior trim board. I pulled back some the Tyvek a little to show what I see there, which is plywood there up to the edge. I would think if I took off the remaining three exterior pieces of trim I would see the same. How then would you suggest I proceed if that's what I see around the entire window, to measure accurately for the rough opening? thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 08-28-08, 12:05 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
Thats sorta why I said I'd take off the interior trim. With that garden window in the center, it's going to be hard to get an accurate rough opening. Normally everything on the inside is flush, so you can go stud to stud and header to sill to get the measurements.
 
  #5  
Old 08-28-08, 12:33 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,193
Received 1,946 Upvotes on 1,746 Posts
Not to contradict anything gunguy said, but if your new window will have a nailing flange, you should look and see if the following will work:

On the outside of the window, measure from the edge of the j-channel on the left to the edge of the j-channel on the right. Let's say it's 88 1/4". Subtract 4 1/4" from that to get your new window width (that would be allowing 2 1/8" on each side for new brickmould trim).

Then for the height, measure from the edge of the j-channel on bottom to the edge of the j-channel on top. Let's say it's 55 1/4". Subtract 4 1/4" again to get the height of the new window.

Using this method, which would make trimming the outside very simple, you'd get measurements such as our hypothetical 84 x 51.

You'd then take those measurements inside and do some measuring to see how a window that size would work. When you completely tear out a window, frame and all, you're going to need all new trim anyway, so you might as well include it in your plans. Covering the old paint lines around your trim is usually desirable, unless you plan on doing some drywall touchup and painting.

Yes, you often want to base a window's measurement on the rough opening, but usually it's a lot easier to make new trim on the inside than it is to mess with the siding on the outside... or both. Plus doing it that way makes the window look symmetrical with the existing exterior so that it doesn't look half-baked, with one size of trim on top, another size on bottom, and yet another size on the sides.

Taking off the interior trim and verifying the actual rough opening size is always a wise move. But the rough opening size can always be made a little smaller by adding additional framing as needed if it's going to make life easier when you go to install the window.
 
  #6  
Old 08-28-08, 12:58 PM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,682
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Gunguy, I'm in the process of taking off the INTERIOR trim now to see whether I can measure for the rough opening, as you first suggested. For some reason even though you said interior I had exterior on the brain and took a piece of that off first. Anyway, once I get the interior trim off and try to check the rough opening, I'll post back.

Xsleeper, I'll be doing what you suggested also, after I check interior measurement of rough opening after removing trim as mentioned above. and will post back.

thanks
 
  #7  
Old 08-28-08, 01:27 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
X is absolutely right in what he says. I only suggested removing the interior first as it gives you an actual measurement of the framing and doesn't disturb any of the weather seal on the exterior. You will have to order whatever you need most likely, since you said you'd like one window.

Always much easier to frame down than to enlarge the opening. And trimming out is easy with equal opening around all sides of the window.

I'd like to see an interior shot...does the drywall bump up under the garden window? Or is it straight across from side to side?
 
  #8  
Old 08-28-08, 03:04 PM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,682
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Gunguy45
I'd like to see an interior shot...does the drywall bump up under the garden window? Or is it straight across from side to side?
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/IMG_0929.jpg

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...1/IMG_0928.jpg

Above are links to a couple of interior shots from each side along the bottom. The blue chalk line is at the level of the bottom 2x4 of the rough window opening.
 
  #9  
Old 08-28-08, 04:22 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
Good deal...at least it wasn't a short window with 2 longer ones on each side. That would have been too strange.

Well, now you know what you have....quit taking pictures and get back to work! lol

Don't be surprised at $600-800 for the window(thats just an old memory guess). Depends on what you want and who you have available.

Again, this isn't too bad a job. Just do it right with flashing and tape.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: