Replacement Window - Nail Fin Question


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Old 09-01-08, 08:03 AM
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Replacement Window - Nail Fin Question

I have a dilema in which I'm replacing a number of 9-yr old vinyl windows in my house. I have wood casements and jambs inside the house that I absolutely do not wish to remove. I'm considering removing the j-channel and vinyl siding and pulling the old windows out from the exterior. I would like to use a replacement window (no nail fin) and install and shim from the outside of the house. My question is, besides foaming in the replacement from the outside and re-installing the j-channel and vinyl siding, do I need flashing or a better way of sealing the rough opening to replacement window gap?
 
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Old 09-01-08, 03:40 PM
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You can fit replacement windows into the existing frames after removing the sash, no interior/exterior changes needed. But you can not fit a new construction window into the existing interior trim and still have a new window outside. A new construction window requires new flashing, which requires some siding removal. If I understand your question correctly, which I am not sure I do.
 
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Old 09-01-08, 04:00 PM
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I think we have a terminology problem.

smoenra...instead of casements..do you mean casing? The trim that is flush to the interior wall around the window?

And jambs are normally an integral part of a window, though they could have been added after install. Could we be talking about sills? Or more correctly stool?

Also, common usage of replacement window is as Bill said. It's an insert that is normally used to replace the moving glass sashes in a wood or metal window.

If you are prepared to remove exterior trim and siding, then no reason (other than shimming) why new construction vinyl windows couldn't be used. This is assuming the jamb is not attached to the existing window. If exterior is peeled back, then flashing, caulk and tape can easily be applied.

And you said you have vinyl windows? Are they vinyl clad wood windows? If not, why do they need to be replaced?
 
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Old 09-01-08, 04:25 PM
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Yes, we do have a terminology problem, sorry. My house is only 9-yrs old. The windows were made by Care-Free, which is out of business and most of the windows are either very drafty or have glass seals that are broken as we have mold growing on several.

The wood that I wish not to remove is the casing and sills/stool. From the inside of my house I can just barely see 1/8" of the window frame. My plan was to keep all of the wood inside the house un-touched and remove the vinyl (not wood clad vinyl) windows from the outside of the house, yes, I plan on removing j-channel and siding to do so. My question is if I use a replacement window (w/o nail fin) how do I seal the area between the window and underneith the j-channel?

thanks for all the replies!
 
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Old 09-01-08, 04:58 PM
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Replacement windows for this are not a viable option. You will not be able to seal the windows reliably. Yes, you can do it, but it won't last, and repairing rotten damaged framing is much more expensive than getting windows that fit your situation. Replacement windows may not even be the correct thickness to fit correctly to your existing sill and extend out to the exterior.

Failed seals can be repaired by better glass shops. Even easier if the sashes are mechanically assembled as opposed to welded seams.

Most lower quality vinyl windows are drafty. They are still more energy efficient than old wood or metal windows, but they can be drafty. It's especially noticeable when the house is much more comfortable due to the efficient glass (no big cold areas near the window), then even a small draft can be felt.

Also, I'd guess that this would be a very non standard size replacement window, but due to the age probably a common new construction size. Even if you have to order them, standard sizes normally beat custom.

Sorry, but I just don't see this as a good idea.

Finally...are you sure Care-free is kaput? Sometimes companies are bought and sold, but the warranties carry over.
I found this...I didn't look too closely.

http://www.marqueewindows.com/series.asp?series=2000

Check with a local window company distributer or building supply...they may have some info you can use.
 
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Old 09-01-08, 05:37 PM
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Thanks for the information. I did look into the warranty with Care-Free's new owner and it is only good for the original home owner, which I'm not.

Regarding replacement windows, I understand that their may be an accessory clip that acts like a nail-fin that can be installed on replacement windows after they're installed. Has anyone heard of this before and how well do they work? Would flashing or any sort of tape prevent damage to the wood structure/framing of the house?

Also, I had a quote to replace the glass only. This however was still an expensive option and I have serious concerns with the life of my vinyl frames as most of my windows are very large.
 
 

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